Cochlear implant debate

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
That's why I think everyone who's deaf or practically deaf should strive to become as skilled at signing as he/she possibly can.

IF they are living where there is someone for them to sign with!
 

Double-U

Member
IF they are living where there is someone for them to sign with!

You do have a point. I live in MS, and I've only seen a few signers (all in the same day, weirdly enough). Last weekend, I saw someone with an implant for the first time in my life. Although I hope I don't lose all of my hearing, the possibility exists, so this kind of stuff has become very interesting to me in the last couple of years.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
IF they are living where there is someone for them to sign with!
Well if they learn ASL they can join the community. Using ASL isn't nessaraily a full time thing. They can still sign in specialized social situtons. It's just like the way most Jewish children won't use Hebrew on a day to day basis (unless they live in a Jewish community) but if they go to Israel, they'll be able to speak it, and BE A PART OF A COMMUNITY.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
You do have a point. I live in MS, and I've only seen a few signers (all in the same day, weirdly enough). Last weekend, I saw someone with an implant for the first time in my life. Although I hope I don't lose all of my hearing, the possibility exists, so this kind of stuff has become very interesting to me in the last couple of years.
That's b/c childhood deafness is low incidence.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
That's why I think everyone who's deaf or practically deaf should strive to become as skilled at signing as he/she possibly can.
That's why I tell parents of kids who are "just HOH" or unilateral or who have progressive loss, to take the plunge and give their kid the addition of ASL, deaf school/classes and deaf camp. ASL isn't THE answer, but it's a part of the puzzle. Being skilled in ASL gives kids another option/skill.
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
Well if they learn ASL they can join the community. Using ASL isn't nessaraily a full time thing. They can still sign in specialized social situtons. It's just like the way most Jewish children won't use Hebrew on a day to day basis (unless they live in a Jewish community) but if they go to Israel, they'll be able to speak it, and BE A PART OF A COMMUNITY.

I live in an area where it has literally been years since I saw anyone sign! You must admit it takes at least two people to have a conversation. And, like anything else, it you don't use it you forget it.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
I live in an area where it has literally been years since I saw anyone sign! You must admit it takes at least two people to have a conversation. And, like anything else, it you don't use it you forget it.
Yes I know. But you can go to classes, get togethers, etc to interact with other signers so you don't forget it. Dhh kids can go to deaf school, classes camps etc and get exposure to Sign that way. Besides you most likely live in an area where it's unusual to hear foriegn languages so that's a silly argument.
 

Bebonang

Active Member
The important thing is for the late deafened is to adapt or get use to being deaf. Learn to live with being deaf. I don't like anyone including authorities or parents to force deaf children to use hearing aids or CI. It should be up to the deaf Child to make the decision if they want to wear hearing devices. I don't not remembered if I had gestured signing growing up but I do remembered I mimed to communicate. I was born deaf and had no ASL because my parents refused to learn to sign. I was always happy to be deaf but no communication since infancy until I was about 9 years old. I had my first hearing aid at that age. With hearing test, I did hear sounds which is not clear on my left ear. My right ear, I am totally deaf and can not use hearing aid, just only the left ear. I was forced to go into the mainstream schools with only oral method (Special Education). I was not happy both the hearing aid and oral communication with only oral method. I wanted to go into the Deaf school where there are students who sign ASL in classrooms and social environment. I was turned down saying that it is better for me to stay in the mainstream schools. I was angry and upset with my parents. Mainstream classes is hard for me to understand without special accommodations. I was supposed to lipread the teachers and hearing students but this does not help me at all. I had to rely on the textbooks or books to learn. The teacher was talking and explaining and hearing students asked questions and I never made out what they said. After I graduated from high school with low grades, I started to learn ASL in 1966 or 1967 with the Deaf teacher who was a pastor of the Lutheran Church (I am not a member of the Lutheran Church). It really open up my feeling a like chest lift up and felt so happy that I can communicate in signs. ASL or other sign language like BSL (Britain Sign Language) are very important to the Deaf children and adults like me. Never force them to do what hearing parents or authorities to make them be like hearing people. We are not like hearing people at all. We are different and we have a hearing disability. WE can do anything like hearing people do like being married, have a home, have children, drive a car and go to work at jobs except that we just can not hear the sounds. We don't like to be force just to make hearing people happy. What about our happiness? Why do we have to suffered?
 
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