Can D/HH people become engineer?

Chimajo

Member
I want to become an engineer. I am very good at math. Although my parents thought it is too hard for me to study engineering, I disagree with them.

Have anyone who are deaf or hard of hearing already become engineer?
What do they do in engineering?
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
A friend of mine and former ADer (Daredevel) is deaf and she is an engineer for NASA.

I know others who are engineers for NASA, IBM and few other corporations.

So, the answer is obvious. Tell your parents to google Deaf community and see what Deaf people can do. That "can"t do" mentality is not good of them to have of you.
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
You can do anything, however, not every job is a good fit.

I'm a software engineer and it's a good fit due to low face to face interactions with people.

You can certainly be an engineer.
 

diehardbiker

Active Member
Tell them that I also disagreed with them.

Even IF my kids were Deaf and they want to study engineering I am all for it.

parents should not let kids down in the first place, shame on them.

Yeah, show this post to your parents, and I am serious about this.

I want to become an engineer. I am very good at math. Although my parents thought it is too hard for me to study engineering, I disagree with them.

Have anyone who are deaf or hard of hearing already become engineer?
What do they do in engineering?
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
You can do anything, however, not every job is a good fit.

I'm a software engineer and it's a good fit due to low face to face interactions with people.

You can certainly be an engineer.

that's just depressing.... really depressing to think like that.

I'm the webmaster/information architect and it's a good fit for me due to high face-to-face interactions with people. I just had over 10 meetings in one week alone including conference calls from people all around the world (used IP-relay for that).

and the kicker? I'm ddddeeeeeeaaaaaaafffffffff!!! probably "deafer" than you.

oh and I just had a meeting with HR today to discuss about getting a better IP-relay service and she'll look into appropriating a budget to make a contract with a captioning agency. my boss and the director are in full support of this because of the nature of my job. I'm part of secretariat so like all senior members - we have to deal with frequent conference calls. My job is international and I work with major humanitarian organizations, UNICEF, Red Cross, etc.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
I want to become an engineer. I am very good at math. Although my parents thought it is too hard for me to study engineering, I disagree with them.

Have anyone who are deaf or hard of hearing already become engineer?
What do they do in engineering?

absolutely. I know several deafies who are engineers - mostly mechanical and electrical.

I myself used to be electrical engineer from Virginia Tech and I've done some engineering works. but I changed to Information Science because it's a better fit for me and I suck at math :lol:
 

Grummer

Active Member
engineering can also be about communication (if thats what hearing people say, theyre partly right, but definitely wrong to think you cant communicate, THERE ARE WAYS, too bad if we're not conventional, someone will value your skills/savvy in engineering. yes its maths but its concepts and 'whys' a such and such needs to be calculated...etc, thats the concept side of engineering, and maybe a task for yourself would, is to suss which ones interests you the most and get into it.
 

Jiro

If You Know What I Mean
Premium Member
my dad wrote me this email last week when I told him that I'm doing well and fine at my new job -

Yo,
All sounds excellent. If only a limitation exists, it should be a hearing difficulty. But you need to figure out to overcome such hardship. Then you will greatly succeed in your way. [...] And seek advices from your friends around who experience similar hearing hardship. And for important meetings, you might ask HR department for a possibility of hiring CART service for you. Or ask your boss to appoint a person to make key summaries for you during conference calls or meetings. Or figure out any creative way to overcome such issue.

Remember, never compromise. Pursue every resource to get things accomplished. Then, a door surely should be opened for you. Where there is a will, there is a way. Believe it. You have to overcome it, find a way. When you break through this barrier, you will be confident for any tasks and positions in the future. You win!!! When you seek hard, people will help you.

Have a good day~

Best, dad

Chimajo, I'm disheartened to see your parents not being very encouraging to you but perhaps you should show them a courage by being an example. study hard and work hard... and your parents will see you in a whole new light.
 

deafbirk

New Member
I have known many different types of deaf engineers. It is not hard as long as you know what you are. Doing. I had a new hire at my place once who was a mechinical eng. He had no clue. What he was doing. Was asking me how to do his cost estimating. Be good. To get lots of intern experience before you graduate. Even if they don't pay you.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
I have known many different types of deaf engineers. It is not hard as long as you know what you are. Doing. I had a new hire at my place once who was a mechinical eng. He had no clue. What he was doing. Was asking me how to do his cost estimating. Be good. To get lots of intern experience before you graduate. Even if they don't pay you.
Internships are a great idea. My younger grandson (age 16) has an engineering internship at an industrial fabricating business. He goes to the worksite sometimes but most of his work is done at home on a computer with special CAD software that they provide. He gets paid for the work, plus gets the experience. (He's still in high school but last year and this year he's been taking engineering courses for college credit as part of a jump start program.)

You are right though. Even the unpaid internships are valuable experience, opportunities to network, build up references, and make good entries for the resume.
 

deafbirk

New Member
Internships are a great idea. My younger grandson (age 16) has an engineering internship at an industrial fabricating business. He goes to the worksite sometimes but most of his work is done at home on a computer with special CAD software that they provide. He gets paid for the work, plus gets the experience. (He's still in high school but last year and this year he's been taking engineering courses for college credit as part of a jump start program.)

You are right though. Even the unpaid internships are valuable experience, opportunities to network, build up references, and make good entries for the resume.

You should get him to take classes in germany. They are the best engineers.
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
Question; Do your parents think it is too hard for you because of your deafness or based on your other skills?
 

Chimajo

Member
Question; Do your parents think it is too hard for you because of your deafness or based on your other skills?

My parents think it is too hard for me, because of the deafness. Maybe it includes others. I think parents thought that it is hard for deaf people to communicate in engineering jobs. Maybe my parents are ignorant.
 
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