Auditory Processing Disorder

knofskia

New Member
Hi all! My name is Angela. I have an auditory processing disorder and moderate hearing loss. My twin sister is DeafRaptor and she is deaf. Growing up, we were mainstreamed; it wasn't until college that we learned about American Sign Language/Deaf Culture. At that point, I was still undiagnosed and considered 'hearing', but decided to learn ASL for my sister. We took several classes and then found a bi-monthly deaf signing group to practice with.

Now, it gets complicated. I have recently learned that I have severe Sensory Processing Disorder. This encompasses the auditory processing disorder that I mentioned earlier; this means that I can't process auditory input quickly, sometimes at all. This also encompasses hyper-sensitivity to all sensory input, in my case; this means that sound, light, smell, taste, and touch are too much for me to process, sometimes painful. So, while I can't always communicate orally with hearing people, I also can't always focus on someone long enough to communicate manually with deaf people. I can only communicate with people who are very patient with me and my situation, and only under certain circumstances.

This has made becoming fluent in ASL very slow and hard. But, I am still practicing ASL for those days when I can't understand speech but can still sign, and so that I can communicate with my sister at all.
 
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Anij

Well-Known Member
Welcome to AD :)

I was born with totally deaf on my right side (+120db), and due to recurring ear infections etc have mild/mod fluctuating HL on my left. I also have APD.

I (when I feel like it... it's not the best HA in the world) wear a Phonak MAXX BTE on my left, nothing on my right.
 
Hi all! My name is Angela. I have an auditory processing disorder and moderate hearing loss. My twin sister is DeafRaptor and she is deaf. Growing up, we were mainstreamed; it wasn't until college that we learned about American Sign Language/Deaf Culture. At that point, I was still undiagnosed and considered 'hearing', but decided to learn ASL for my sister. We took several classes and then found a bi-monthly deaf signing group to practice with.


I was just how old you were when you were diagnosed with the Auditory Processing Disorder. Also, how is that you weren't diagnosed until Adulthood? I'm just curious. I've read up on APD and am just wondering, if you were experience symptoms as you were growing up?

:welcome: To All:deaf: .com
 

Anij

Well-Known Member
Wirelessly posted (Blackberry Bold )

Lots of people with APD aren't diagnosed until they're adults (because were finally able to dialogue about how and what we hear, and are taken seriously by AuD.s)

It's easy for APD to be missed for years, if not decades because there isn't a reliable test for it and we don't know we aren't hearing the same as everyone else ;)

I was Dx'd as Hoh (left), deaf (right) by the time I was 6 or so, however not Dx'd with APD until I was an adult because I was finally able to (independantly) explain how difficult it was for me to understand speech, something that was reinforced by the adjustments we made when I got my first HA (as an adult)

HTH
 

knofskia

New Member
Growing up, the ultimate test used for deciding whether or not I could hear was based on how well I did in school; if I was doing well, I must be able to hear the teachers' lectures and instructions, right? The truth is I never could follow enough of what the teacher was saying to learn anything (my ability to 'hear' fluctuates with how much I am able to process at one time: maybe a word, or phrase), but I wrote notes on everything they wrote on the board and studied the textbooks and my notes for hours and hours.
 
Growing up, the ultimate test used for deciding whether or not I could hear was based on how well I did in school; if I was doing well, I must be able to hear the teachers' lectures and instructions, right? The truth is I never could follow enough of what the teacher was saying to learn anything (my ability to 'hear' fluctuates with how much I am able to process at one time: maybe a word, or phrase), but I wrote notes on everything they wrote on the board and studied the textbooks and my notes for hours and hours.

hmmm.... I was diagnosed with Meniere's in adulthood...all through middle and high school I would have these episode were I had ringing in my ears and then it felt like I was underwater and everyone else was above water, it would even get so bad that I would be talking very loudly but it sounded like normal to me and when I talked normal(to everyone else) it sounded like whispering to me and I thought people couldn't hear me...it was aggravating and of course my parents either didn't believe me or didn't want to be bother with having to take me to the doctor...my stepdad always said I was a "Hypochondriac" b/c I studied basically everything I could to educate myself and when I would mention a problem he would just say I was making it up...........

I also had and still have instances where when someone is talking to me, I only catch part of what they say unless they are looking at me and I can see their lips moving, its really bad when my grandma calls me from the other room or ask me a question...my family always said I was ignoring them but I would say "No I'm not, I didn't hear you, when in truth I would hear part of it but not enough to understand what they wanted or if they even wanted me. Now, I have a 5 year old daughter and I don't won't her to have to go through what I went through with my parents.
 

meirad

New Member
I think i have ADP, my mom's trying to get an audiologist to call back to schedule an appointment. I've always had trouble figuring out what people are saying and i don't talk on the phone because after someone says something it sounds like someone tapping a microphone in beat with it and a lot of other weird things. I didn't really think anything of it until i start college "i was home schooled".

I just started realizing how much i rely on notes and cramming all night to get anywhere in class. If someone is talking six inches from me while the teacher is talking, there's no way i can hear them etc. Lectures are horrible, i feel like it takes an eternity to absorb the info and the class is already onto to something else. It's been hard this semester... :(
 
Hi all! My name is Angela. I have an auditory processing disorder and moderate hearing loss. My twin sister is DeafRaptor and she is deaf. Growing up, we were mainstreamed; it wasn't until college that we learned about American Sign Language/Deaf Culture. At that point, I was still undiagnosed and considered 'hearing', but decided to learn ASL for my sister. We took several classes and then found a bi-monthly deaf signing group to practice with.

Now, it gets complicated. I have recently learned that I have severe Sensory Processing Disorder. This encompasses the auditory processing disorder that I mentioned earlier; this means that I can't process auditory input quickly, sometimes at all. This also encompasses hyper-sensitivity to all sensory input, in my case; this means that sound, light, smell, taste, and touch are too much for me to process, sometimes painful. So, while I can't always communicate orally with hearing people, I also can't always focus on someone long enough to communicate manually with deaf people. I can only communicate with people who are very patient with me and my situation, and only under certain circumstances.

This has made becoming fluent in ASL very slow and hard. But, I am still practicing ASL for those days when I can't understand speech but can still sign, and so that I can communicate with my sister at all.

Hi all! My name is Angela. I have an auditory processing disorder and moderate hearing loss. My twin sister is DeafRaptor and she is deaf. Growing up, we were mainstreamed; it wasn't until college that we learned about American Sign Language/Deaf Culture. At that point, I was still undiagnosed and considered 'hearing', but decided to learn ASL for my sister. We took several classes and then found a bi-monthly deaf signing group to practice with.

Now, it gets complicated. I have recently learned that I have severe Sensory Processing Disorder. This encompasses the auditory processing disorder that I mentioned earlier; this means that I can't process auditory input quickly, sometimes at all. This also encompasses hyper-sensitivity to all sensory input, in my case; this means that sound, light, smell, taste, and touch are too much for me to process, sometimes painful. So, while I can't always communicate orally with hearing people, I also can't always focus on someone long enough to communicate manually with deaf people. I can only communicate with people who are very patient with me and my situation, and only under certain circumstances.

This has made becoming fluent in ASL very slow and hard. But, I am still practicing ASL for those days when I can't understand speech but can still sign, and so that I can communicate with my sister at all.

Hi all! My name is Angela. I have an auditory processing disorder and moderate hearing loss. My twin sister is DeafRaptor and she is deaf. Growing up, we were mainstreamed; it wasn't until college that we learned about American Sign Language/Deaf Culture. At that point, I was still undiagnosed and considered 'hearing', but decided to learn ASL for my sister. We took several classes and then found a bi-monthly deaf signing group to practice with.

Now, it gets complicated. I have recently learned that I have severe Sensory Processing Disorder. This encompasses the auditory processing disorder that I mentioned earlier; this means that I can't process auditory input quickly, sometimes at all. This also encompasses hyper-sensitivity to all sensory input, in my case; this means that sound, light, smell, taste, and touch are too much for me to process, sometimes painful. So, while I can't always communicate orally with hearing people, I also can't always focus on someone long enough to communicate manually with deaf people. I can only communicate with people who are very patient with me and my situation, and only under certain circumstances.

This has made becoming fluent in ASL very slow and hard. But, I am still practicing ASL for those days when I can't understand speech but can still sign, and so that I can communicate with my sister at all.


https://www.hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2020/2692794

Hi Angela, these links I send, have helped me understand my TBI better.
My "thinking voice", has had trouble sending correct messages to my "vocal voice".
Closed Bone TBI's happen more often than people think, and go sometimes unreported, and unfound (it took 3 scans to find mine, so small)

For me, if you are standing in front of me, and talking to me with "clear eyes", and clear voice, I can communicate with you fine, as long as there are no other voices or loud sounds in the room.

I have spoken about my "wireless bone conduction headphones" before, and they have helped me so much. When I'm done talking, I just switch back to my learning and music therapy, it pushes the Tinnitus aside for awhile.

Hope this helps
 
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