Audiogram today

JennyB

New Member
After some hearing problems I had another audiogram today. Here are the results...

Freq L R
250Hz 100 100
500Hz 105 115
750Hz 115 NR

Everything else is NR.

If there was ever any doubt that I am profoundly Deaf...:giggle:
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
After some hearing problems I had another audiogram today. Here are the results...

Freq L R
250Hz 100 100
500Hz 105 115
750Hz 115 NR

Everything else is NR.

If there was ever any doubt that I am profoundly Deaf...:giggle:

Nah, just ask one of our more famous members. Just a few tweaks of the transpositional element by your audi, and you will be all set. ;)
 

JennyB

New Member
Nah, just ask one of our more famous members. Just a few tweaks of the transpositional element by your audi, and you will be all set. ;)

:giggle: Transposition is on full - no help there. I guess stemcells is clearly the answer. Better buy my plane ticket to china and book a cage next to the test monkey. :laugh2:
 

Pinky

New Member
LoL! You guys are funny!

Jenny, Wow! You can hearing more than my hearing loss worst. Mine is 120db. :( I've had 115 db when I was 18 and 22 years old. My hearing is getting worse lost about 5 db. That is why I can't get benefit for new hearing aids. My previous HA was 60% to 65%. My left CI is 30db now. How about your HA's db when you took the hearing test?
 
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deafdude1

New Member
After some hearing problems I had another audiogram today. Here are the results...

Freq L R
250Hz 100 100
500Hz 105 115
750Hz 115 NR

Everything else is NR.

If there was ever any doubt that I am profoundly Deaf...:giggle:

Did you notice your hearing getting worse yet again? What kind of hearing problems were you having? As for your thresholds in the lows, did you feel vibrations at anytime, especially at 115db? How are you hearing with the L HA and especially with the R HA?

Ive been reading alot about cochlear dead regions and that the OHC account for 60db of hearing and IHC accounts for another 30db of hearing. Has any conductive component to your loss been suspected? Did you ever respond to a bone conduction test several years ago before your loss progressed? Id like to be tested for dead regions and to get some questions answered, such as how people like me can have more than 90db loss and still hear sounds at the correct pitch. I have a HL of at least 110db at 1000Hz and when I repeat that tone to my dad, he confirms that it sounds the same to him too. I also can tell the pitch differences to around 1200Hz, above that the pitch sounds much the same or I simply hear a low frequency buzz or nothing at all. What's it like for you?

Transposition is on full - no help there.

Didn't you say it was helping you just last month when you had a bit of hearing at 1000Hz? Transposition is no help for me either, the cutoff is 1500Hz

TheWriteAlex

Jenny does not have an aided audiogram, but she mentioned she can't have her HA gains maxed cause her brain can't handle more sounds. What's your unaided and aided audiogram, thewritealex? Mine are all here:

A deaf dude's life: All my audiograms thus far with my comments on them!
 

TWA

New Member
Premium Member
TheWriteAlex
What's your unaided and aided audiogram, thewritealex? Mine are all here:

DD, I don't have any electronic audiograms, but here's the numbers. This is from a year ago. I suspect I've lost some hearing since. This is unaided. I don't have an audiogram with the Naidas yet, but I am going in on Nov. 2nd for an extensive aided/unaided audiogram and tuning. I'll report the aided scores.

250hz: 15db
500hz: 35db
750hz: 55db
1000hz:90db
1500hz and above: 110db

You seem to have had good good luck in programing your Naidas. What was it that you changed from the program that the computer automatically fits?

I may want to turn off the gain 250-500hz, and only boost 750+ and see what happens...
 

lovezebras

Active Member
15dB isn't a loss 35dB is a bit below normal and 55 is mild-moderate and then profound...weird also surprised that u are doing an aided audiogram..usually those are only done with CI evaluations
 

TWA

New Member
Premium Member
15dB isn't a loss 35dB is a bit below normal and 55 is mild-moderate and then profound...weird also surprised that u are doing an aided audiogram..usually those are only done with CI evaluations

I don't mean to sound crabby, Alicia, but I'm well aware of what levels constitute a loss and to what degree. :wave: But just to be clear, 55 is on the high end of moderate, not mild-moderate.

As I mentioned on your thread, I haven't met many people with my type of loss. It's hard to fit with a hearing aid, and it can be very frustrating in real life. Somebody can be talking to me and I hear their voice at a normal level but cannot understand a word of what they're saying, even if I'm speechreading. If I'm not speechreading, I cannot understand anything, at all, in any situation.

I requested the aided audiogram because I wanted to see how I am actually benefiting from the aids in terms of numbers. I am also going to take a proactive role in programming the aid. I'm tired of audis listening to my concerns, making a little adjustment on the computer without telling me what it is, and then saying, "Here, try this." I feel like at this point, I know just as much about sound frequency as them, and I know my own body much better than them, so why shouldn't I have a role in deciding what to change or not?

The audis have mentioned CIs to me, but I don't think I'm a candidate, especially with the normal hearing at lower frequencies.
 

deafdude1

New Member
250hz: 15db
500hz: 35db
750hz: 55db
1000hz:90db
1500hz and above: 110db

You seem to have had good good luck in programing your Naidas. What was it that you changed from the program that the computer automatically fits?

I may want to turn off the gain 250-500hz, and only boost 750+ and see what happens...

You have cochlear dead zones, ill discuss this here:

http://www.alldeaf.com/hearing-aids-cochlear-implants/63471-good-articles-identifying-cochlear-dead-spots.html

I had the gain in the lows maxed out and I was able to hear more sounds and speech. I probably hear aided similar to what you hear unaided, but of course with more distortion than you.

Your HAs have a fitting range that starts at 40db in the lows so I am surprised your audiologist sold you those HAs. Are you able to hear any internal white noise with those HAs in a quiet room?

Do your molds have any vents? Discuss with different audiologists if a vent may help. I read that it would reduce occulsion and roll off the lows, of which you don't need to max the gains anyway.

As I mentioned on your thread, I haven't met many people with my type of loss. It's hard to fit with a hearing aid, and it can be very frustrating in real life. Somebody can be talking to me and I hear their voice at a normal level but cannot understand a word of what they're saying, even if I'm speechreading. If I'm not speechreading, I cannot understand anything, at all, in any situation.

You have a less common audiogram where your loss slopes precipitously. I read around and most people with your audiogram get little or no improvement with HAs. The problem seems to be that HAs can't be programmed for such a steep audiogram and also they have a huge cochlear dead region.

How often do you wear HAs and how much do they help with speech? Making sounds louder? Ive read that people with your audiogram are able to understand about 50% speech in quiet and of course much less in noise. Is there anyone or any situation where you can understand some speech without lipreading? I can understand about half of what my dad says without lipreading, but with other people, it's much less. With lipreading, it's 80% for anyone who speaks clearly.

I requested the aided audiogram because I wanted to see how I am actually benefiting from the aids in terms of numbers. I am also going to take a proactive role in programming the aid. I'm tired of audis listening to my concerns, making a little adjustment on the computer without telling me what it is, and then saying, "Here, try this." I feel like at this point, I know just as much about sound frequency as them, and I know my own body much better than them, so why shouldn't I have a role in deciding what to change or not?

I took an active role in having my own HAs programmed. If your audiologist won't cooperate, id buy HAs from America Hears where you can program the HAs yourself. Your HL is in the fitting range out to a little past 750Hz. Anything above won't matter as your cochlea is dead. Id try having your HAs programmed for no gain and minimum SPL above 1500Hz, then no gain above 1000Hz, then no gain above 750Hz and compare the difference. You may find that you hear clearer when not trying to amplify well into a cochlea dead zone.

The audis have mentioned CIs to me, but I don't think I'm a candidate, especially with the normal hearing at lower frequencies.

One of my audies mentioned CI to me but he changed his mind saying he wouldn't recommend a CI for me as there was no guarantee ill hear better and that id forfiet my residual hearing and can never go back to HAs. CI is great for those who can't hear, not even with HAs. Your hearing is way better than mine.

You have cochlear dead zones, ill discuss this in further detail here:

http://www.alldeaf.com/hearing-aids-cochlear-implants/63471-good-articles-identifying-cochlear-dead-spots.html
 

ecp

Member
Why we can have thresholds higher than 90 dB. In short OHC and IHC aren't addative

Ive been reading alot about cochlear dead regions and that the OHC account for 60db of hearing and IHC accounts for another 30db of hearing. Has any conductive component to your loss been suspected? Did you ever respond to a bone conduction test several years ago before your loss progressed? Id like to be tested for dead regions and to get some questions answered, such as how people like me can have more than 90db loss and still hear sounds at the correct pitch. I have a HL of at least 110db at 1000Hz and when I repeat that tone to my dad, he confirms that it sounds the same to him too. I also can tell the pitch differences to around 1200Hz, above that the pitch sounds much the same or I simply hear a low frequency buzz or nothing at all. What's it like for you?

One thing- yes OHCs contribute ~60dB but you can't just add the 60dB of OHC and 30dB of IHC because inner hair cells transmit sound to the auditory cortex. In people with profound hearing loss Outer and Inner hair cells are damaged.

Here is an illustration I just mashed together:
The complete journey sound takes is this-
1. From outer ear to eardrum
2. Eardrum vibrates and makes the middle ear bones vibrate
3. The vibration of the middle ear bones pushes against an opening in the cochlea which causes a fluid wave
4. The fluid wave in the cochlea stimulates the hair cells
5. Outer hair cells act as amplifiers and distinguish frequency
6. Inner hair cells connect the outer hair cells to the auditory nerve
7. the auditory nerve connects to the brain

Step 6 is the answer to deafdude's question about why people can have thresholds above 90dB. If the connection first part of the connection to the brain (inner hair cells) doesn't work, the signal never reaches the brain. And even if some sound reaches the brain, it is very degraded sound which explains why profoundly deaf people have poor speech recognition.

This also explains how cochlear implants work. The electrode of the CI sits where the inner hair cells should be and provides a stimulus to the auditory nerve.

View attachment 14246

mi83w
 

TWA

New Member
Premium Member
Are you able to hear any internal white noise with those HAs in a quiet room?

Yes, I hear it a lot, but it's not a problem.

Do your molds have any vents? Discuss with different audiologists if a vent may help. I read that it would reduce occulsion and roll off the lows, of which you don't need to max the gains anyway.

Yes, I have large vents, and they help a lot. The mold is also trimmed down a bit, which helps. Actually, I do not sound plugged up at all. Audi did a great job with that. These have been more or less the most "comfortable" aids I've ever worn, with maybe the exception of the Widex Senso.


You have a less common audiogram where your loss slopes precipitously. I read around and most people with your audiogram get little or no improvement with HAs. The problem seems to be that HAs can't be programmed for such a steep audiogram and also they have a huge cochlear dead region.

Indeed, there is little middle ground to work with. I go from normal hearing to profoundly deaf very rapidly. It can be quite frustrating. The aids do help in certain situations, but not much. Still, I feel it's better than without. One of the big reasons I use them is for the visibility. I WANT people to see my aids and know that I can't hear them. If I didn't, a lot of people would think I am ignoring them, or that I'm stupid or on drugs. The FM system and Bluetooth gadgetry is also useful. Also, they help a bit for listening to music.


How often do you wear HAs and how much do they help with speech? Making sounds louder? Ive read that people with your audiogram are able to understand about 50% speech in quiet and of course much less in noise. Is there anyone or any situation where you can understand some speech without lipreading?

I wear them whenever I am out in the hearing world, which is most of the time. I take them off at home. They help with speech a little, but only in certain situations. I understand far less than 50% of speech, even in quiet environments, if I can't see someone's face. Aids make no difference in that case. If I can see the person's face, however, and it's a quiet environment, I can understand almost everything. In a loud environment, I am pretty much deaf as far as being able to decipher speech, with or without aids and speechreading. At the same time, I am able to understand my mother on the phone because I am so used to her voice and all her mannerisms. I can tell what she is saying even if I can't hear her. Same with my twin brother, who has the same loss as mine (he does not wear aids).


You have cochlear dead zones

Yep, I'm pretty sure of that too. Does this mean that a CI cannot stimulate sound in that region of the cochlea?
 

JennyB

New Member
Did you notice your hearing getting worse yet again? What kind of hearing problems were you having?

I just lost all ability to understand speech slowly over the 2 weeks before the test.

As for your thresholds in the lows, did you feel vibrations at anytime, especially at 115db? How are you hearing with the L HA and especially with the R HA?

Of course I have had a tactile response. I know the difference between tactile and hearing though.

I am hearing, but not understanding. It's just noise.


Has any conductive component to your loss been suspected? Did you ever respond to a bone conduction test several years ago before your loss progressed?

I have a mixed loss. My eardrums are a nice little mass of scar tissue. I respond on bone conducted tests because I bypass the eardrums.

I also can tell the pitch differences to around 1200Hz, above that the pitch sounds much the same or I simply hear a low frequency buzz or nothing at all. What's it like for you?


I can understand pitch tactically. I have some auditory understanding of pitch as well.


Didn't you say it was helping you just last month when you had a bit of hearing at 1000Hz? Transposition is no help for me either, the cutoff is 1500Hz


My hearing fluctuates. Sometimes I can hear at 1500hz. Yesterdays test was the worse it has been ever.
 

DeafDoc1

New Member
Premium Member
After some hearing problems I had another audiogram today. Here are the results...

Freq L R
250Hz 100 100
500Hz 105 115
750Hz 115 NR

Everything else is NR.

If there was ever any doubt that I am profoundly Deaf...:giggle:

JennyB, sorry you've lost that speech perception. That was really exciting when you posted it.

My audiogram last November was very similar to this. I haven't gone back for another yet. I've found my Naidas are less and less useful, and they now spend equal time in my ears and on my dresser. Have you found this too?
 
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