ATTN: Those who wants to do interviews/questions/surveys - Please read this FIRST.

TWA

New Member
Premium Member
No kidding! I just finished up intro ASL class (even though I have taken two classes in the past), and many of the students were so disrespectful of the teacher and the Deaf experience in general: whispering to one another in class, talking aloud when the teacher was not in the room (even though it was explicitly stated that it was against the rules), or when we went on a campus tour and she could not watch everyone. It was quite clear that they still felt superior in some way to Deaf people. It disgusted me.

Luckily, no future interpreters, I don't think...


Good idea.

As someone who recently took an ASL class, it's obvious that most of them are either afraid of deaf people or don't feel like making the effort to go to deaf coffee chats.

The worst part? Some of them want to be interpreters.
 

sequoias

Active Member
Premium Member
I agree.

I think the students need to confront a real deaf person in person and have a interview or research on the internet to find answers rather doing the easy way out. That's what homework is supposed to be about...fustration and patience to find the answer.
 

mindy2121

New Member
Thank you for the welcome. I will/have searched many many threads throughout the site and found some interesting and insiring information. I know it has to be frusterating when students are always asking the same questions. We are required to post something...the difficulty is posting a question that hasn't been answered before. I hope that those willing to share their experiences again, or for the first time will do so.
Again, thank you for your time. It is truly appreciated and will help many of these students become better teachers for children who are deaf or HOH.
 

aslforme03

New Member
Just a teacher's opinion.

I understand how many of you feel. I teach ASL at the high school and college level. I recently started a certificate program at one of the colleges where I teach. Most of the students are from smaller communities and there are not a lot of Deaf around. I want them to start chatting with Deaf and learn about the culture from people in the culture. I hope they do not bother anyone but they just do not have a lot of options. They are really looking forward to chatting with people and just reading some of the other responses. I hope this is ok.
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
I understand how many of you feel. I teach ASL at the high school and college level. I recently started a certificate program at one of the colleges where I teach. Most of the students are from smaller communities and there are not a lot of Deaf around. I want them to start chatting with Deaf and learn about the culture from people in the culture. I hope they do not bother anyone but they just do not have a lot of options. They are really looking forward to chatting with people and just reading some of the other responses. I hope this is ok.

Of course they can come make conversation like civilized people and stay and interact.

I think the rule happened from students posting the same questions, and then never said thank you or participated in the forum.
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
Of course they can come make conversation like civilized people and stay and interact.

I think the rule happened from students posting the same questions, and then never said thank you or participated in the forum.

In my opinion, I think that's the best way to learn about Deaf culture than just asking random questions and then never returning.
 

Jolie77

New Member
Premium Member
Of course they can come make conversation like civilized people and stay and interact.

I think the rule happened from students posting the same questions, and then never said thank you or participated in the forum.

That is why something had to be done about this. If they want to come here to make a conversation and to interact, ask questions (other than the ones that were already asked), or to expand their knowledge in relations to deaf culture, ASL or whatever it is -- That is also perfectly fine.

The problem was, A lot of them came on this forum to post once and never wanted to be part of this in order to dig deeper to find the answers.
 

duraglit

New Member
Hello, I am D. I'm from Maine.

I am certainly looking forward to some wonderful discourse on this forum.

I was exposed to much loud noise while in The Marine Corps and my Mom was partially Deaf from a very young age.

Sort of a double whammy.

As I get older, my hearing continues to fade. The VA says that I have a "notch." But, right now, a hearing-aid would just aggravate me. (sigh)

See you around campus.

:)
 

debnrotts

New Member
I am new to the site. I read your post and I completely understand where you are coming from. I am on here for my ASL class but also for my own reasons. My nephew is deaf and will be moving this fall to a deaf community by himself and my granddaughter is going deaf. I hope not to offend anyone with stupid questions. If I do please let me know.
 

dogmom

Well-Known Member
:wave: debnrotts - u have Rotties? Or "nrotts" relates to something else?

new hoh and husband deaf w/o aids <oral>. I sign some and am learning more. Spent several Summers working with Deaf kids and Deaf staff.
 

bldodson1

New Member
I really appreciate your post. Those of us who are students often don't know how to go about asking these questions or conducting our required interviews! To be honest I wish we didn't have to do formal interviews and could just explore the community without feeling like we are begging for questionaires to be filled out!!!!! Anyways thanks to you and this site for supporting students.
 

Jolie77

New Member
Premium Member
I really appreciate your post. Those of us who are students often don't know how to go about asking these questions or conducting our required interviews! To be honest I wish we didn't have to do formal interviews and could just explore the community without feeling like we are begging for questionaires to be filled out!!!!! Anyways thanks to you and this site for supporting students.

You're welcome. This is the reason why we wanted to state this is because by begging for questionnaires, that seems to be the "easy' way out of learning something than for them to do the actual inter-reaction among others in order to learn instead of getting the supposedly answer that may be meaningless.

Welcome to AllDeaf and feel free to post around among us! :)
 

DonnaB

New Member
Well, I am not seeking an answer from you, but instead a (gentle) push in the correct direction. According to a book that I am reading " A Phone of our Own" By Lang, it is stated that in 1977 there were about 27,000 TTYs in use by Deaf and HoH persons. My request is that someone point me in the direction to locate a reliable source as to aprox. how many Deaf and Hoh citzens were there in America at that time?
Thank You
Donna B
 

Kiranadia

New Member
I am an ASL 1 student. Since I was ten I tried teaching myself ASL (unfortunately that is very difficult, and there were no classes I could take until college) Now I am 20 years old trying to become a Sign Language Interpreter. I don't want any answers... I just want to talk with people, get to know them on a personal level. And (God Willing) be able to meet with deaf people in Southern California (North Orange County) So I can learn more signs, more appropriate grammar (not English word order or PSE and especially not SEE) I want to learn all I can of real ASL now, and expand on that with the other variations later.

If anyone knows of any Deaf events or even better Deaf Communities in this area I would love to visit!!! I know of one called Deafblock at the Block in Orange... Once I find out when it is, I'll post it in an appropriate thread/forum.

Thanks again for allowing some of us stupid hearing people to come in and interact with all of you, it truly is a blessing to us!

If I ask any stupid questions please just punch me in the face okay? I don't want to offend anyone, I would much rather read through post after post after post to learn the information that I'm curious about or even maybe later assignments. I will get more accurate answers that way...

Thank again!
 

melissa

New Member
It always amuses me when people ask 'What's it like not being able to hear?'- if it's obvious they mean well, I talk about how frustrating it is when I mishear things, things like that, peoples' attitudes towards me, but otherwise I tend to say 'How should I know? What's it like being able to hear?' hehe. Sometimes I want to ask, if they're male (I'm female) 'What's it like being a man?' and watch their face- I've always heard the way I do, and they've always been male, so there!

I have a friend who uses a wheelchair, and I did once ask him 'What's it like being in a wheelchair?' and he looked at me blankly- he hasn't always used a wheelchair though, he used to use crutches, and I think the difference between the two was what I really meant.
 

xsuperchick

New Member
It always amuses me when people ask 'What's it like not being able to hear?'- if it's obvious they mean well, I talk about how frustrating it is when I mishear things, things like that, peoples' attitudes towards me, but otherwise I tend to say 'How should I know? What's it like being able to hear?' hehe. Sometimes I want to ask, if they're male (I'm female) 'What's it like being a man?' and watch their face- I've always heard the way I do, and they've always been male, so there!

I have a friend who uses a wheelchair, and I did once ask him 'What's it like being in a wheelchair?' and he looked at me blankly- he hasn't always used a wheelchair though, he used to use crutches, and I think the difference between the two was what I really meant.

I'll try answering with that "What's it like being able to hear?" :lol:
 

SpiceHD

Active Member
if you guys would like.. i can browse through all those threads during next week and find all those questionaires then send them all to a mod :) . i m off next 2 weeks and definitely will go nuts because i wont have a thing to do lol.
 

Belinda Dill

New Member
hi im new here

I'm Belinda and 55 yrs old. i was born deaf and i went and graduated ida public school with deaf classes. i grew up in Michigan. Now I'm in Calif., married to hearing man of 25 yrs and 3 hearing kids. hobby is sewing, quilting, and barbie collect.:wave:
 
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