Asked to change swimming lesson classes.

Cloggy

New Member
I signed my son (age 3) up for swimming lessons at the local pool. Without his hearing aids, he can hear virtually no verbal language. On the first day, I told the teacher of his hearing diffuculties and she assured me that it wouldn't be a problem. I even offered to stay close by the side to sign when necessary or to show her some basic signs Noah may need during class (wait, stop, sit down, your turn, blow bubbles, kick, etc.). I also explained that he is quite efficient at reading lips and he will answer orally, as that is his first language. The first lesson went fine. The next day, the Director approached him and said, "We feel that having Noah in the pool is a safety concern because he can't hear us. There is a special needs class that you could attend".

I was LIVID and dumbfounded. I replied asking her, "If there was a Spanish speaking child would you insist that they attend the special needs class?" Of course she tole me "No". I retorted that Noah doesn't have a special need and that him not being able to hear is no more a liability than a Spanish speaking child with an English speaking teacher!

Begrudgingly, they have allowed him to remain in the class.

If situations like this arise again, is there a better way that I should handle it? The whole thing made me mad and sad at the same time.



Well handled.
For Lotte we had her sister or brother with her in the water. That worked well, and the instructors had an extra helping hand.
Yesterday Lotte got her third diploma. One every year on vacation in Holland.
Have a look at her blog.. Lotte-Sofie.blogspot.com


Don't tie up. Have someone familiar with him that can help and in no time it will be fine.


Good luck
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
It's not a question of not being able to learn. It's a question of learning correctly. If a person can't learn correctly in a course, that course is not the course for that person.

Once a person has correct knowledge that person can do anything.

I get your point...but from what the mother said, the special needs class is not a class to learn the fundamentals of swimming. Just playing in the water. If the mother wants her child to learn to be a swimmer, the special needs class is not the right class for her child.
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
Amazing because my brother and I were enrolled in swimming lessons at our community pool and we did fine. That was like 35 years ago and this is still an issue of people being ignorant?
 

whatdidyousay!

Well-Known Member
As someone who grew up as a deaf child, I can tell you that, "normal" classes are not always the best thing for that child. This is even more true when dealing with something that can be dangerous for that child such as swimming. For my child, I would take the special class for this subject if offered. It's more important to take care of the child in this case.

It is pointless to compare a deaf life with someone that is hearing because it is comparing two totally different things. People born deaf have a deaf life(some better some worse), it is what it is.

Some parents may not want to have their child feel that they're difference by sending them to an extra help class. And no two child are alike some kids like a good challenge and like to prove a person wrong.
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
I get your point...but from what the mother said, the special needs class is not a class to learn the fundamentals of swimming. Just playing in the water. If the mother wants her child to learn to be a swimmer, the special needs class is not the right class for her child.

Yes, it might have been better to seek a place outside of that school. Perhaps a class with one on one interaction.
 

NaidaUP

Well-Known Member
It's not a question of not being able to learn. It's a question of learning correctly. If a person can't learn correctly in a course, that course is not the course for that person.

Once a person has correct knowledge that person can do anything.

That is so true!


:yesway:
 

Phoenix23

New Member
I signed my son (age 3) up for swimming lessons at the local pool. Without his hearing aids, he can hear virtually no verbal language. On the first day, I told the teacher of his hearing diffuculties and she assured me that it wouldn't be a problem. I even offered to stay close by the side to sign when necessary or to show her some basic signs Noah may need during class (wait, stop, sit down, your turn, blow bubbles, kick, etc.). I also explained that he is quite efficient at reading lips and he will answer orally, as that is his first language. The first lesson went fine. The next day, the Director approached him and said, "We feel that having Noah in the pool is a safety concern because he can't hear us. There is a special needs class that you could attend".

I was LIVID and dumbfounded. I replied asking her, "If there was a Spanish speaking child would you insist that they attend the special needs class?" Of course she tole me "No". I retorted that Noah doesn't have a special need and that him not being able to hear is no more a liability than a Spanish speaking child with an English speaking teacher!

Begrudgingly, they have allowed him to remain in the class.

If situations like this arise again, is there a better way that I should handle it? The whole thing made me mad and sad at the same time.

Oh I'd have been livid! Good stuff standing up to that! Granted I'm the deaf one... but I know my mom has stood up for me in times like that, and nothing makes me love and respect how strong of a woman my mother is like all the stuff just like you did! WONDERFUL! :cheers::dance::ily::thumb:
 

caz12

New Member
i have deaf friend who lifegard..my opinion someone with disability and (i hate using that word when pertaining to deaf)are far safer you know limitations and work with what you have and lifegards know this and it makes no odds to them..
I was told if you have heart or epilepsy problems then they bring extra lifegard in just for that session(i think deaf diver won medal at olympics)

true
 

overthepond

New Member
Amazing because my brother and I were enrolled in swimming lessons at our community pool and we did fine. That was like 35 years ago and this is still an issue of people being ignorant?


Ditto, I learnt swimming with hearing peers and lived to tell the tale!
 
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