Amazon Delivery employees

SneakerNet

Retired
Premium Member
Hi Guys! Anyone who work for Amazon that deliver packages and use Amazon truck or van, I'm curious does Amazon truck provide GPS or built in GPS?? Someone asked me if I have any GPS that I no longer use and she need one? I'm puzzled about it.
 

Calvin

In Hazzard County
Super Moderator
Premium Member
I doubt Amazon provides GPS to their drivers. They give their drivers a mobile device that a customer tracks the exact location of their package(s) and gives them time frame when it arrives for delivery. They scan the package and take picture at the doorstep or porch as a proof of delivery. I'm not sure if Amazon mobile device have map to guide the drivers. I know how it feels running routes blind (unfamiliar areas) and it makes things difficult for the drivers. Have seen it at my work where a few cover drivers ran his/her route blind.
 

SneakerNet

Retired
Premium Member
Thanks Calvin, I just learn more about this person. The reason she asked for GPS is because she now got a job at Amazon and she have mobile phone but no data plan. She couldn't afford it at the moment. So She need GPS to find nearest free wifi location like Starbucks or whatever and use her phone to check things out during her break. She can't use Amazon GPS because it's a fix route planner. She can't add new destination/stop in Amazon GPS.
 

Calvin

In Hazzard County
Super Moderator
Premium Member
Ah got it. There is free wifi locator app but since she doesn't have data plan.. maybe I can suggest to ask someone at gas station or ask her customer before her break starts. Doesn't hurt to ask for a little help from someone.. or text a friend to look it up for her.

Yeah I can't add anything on a company mobile device either. The department I work in had started using mobile device since spring which took a bit of time getting used to.
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
There are ways to set the phone to attach to any open wifi. And I know that many Comcast customers have an automatic open wifi on their routers. She would have to be a Comcast customer, but that might be an option. I know that since I'm a Comcast customer anytime my phone is near a Comcast router, it will automatically connect.
 

rayshow09

New Member
I am interested in becoming an Amazon Delivery Driver. I've seen adverts. Found amazon phone number .. hope it helps

Has anyone done this specific job, and if so, what was it like?

I have delivery driver experience (restaurants), which was reasonably demanding, as you had to deliver multiple meals over distance before they went cold.
 

x1heavy

Member
If you have a smart phone sufficiently advanced it is already with a map that knows where it is in the world. If not in a particular room or floor of your building as well. Its in the phone's android google maps etc. It will follow you. One time I had a doctors appt who moved already to another street across a large city, and once I put in the street name, the phone knew already where I was at currently (Old doc office) and it was no trouble to workout a map route to next location in a few minutes.

As a trucker I don't normally rely on GPS and prefer old fashioned motor carriers atlas from rand each year and pen and paper. However the laptop and smartphone does have GPS mapping for anywhere in the world in either Topographical (Land mountain mapping, for out west where there is no maps... you correlate to where you are and how high up in the terrain you are) or street maps etc.

I know the trucking company has tracking devices for the tractor trailer that is good down to about maybe 6 inches somedays anywhere in North America. Usually 10 feet or less which is plenty. When you go into places like NYC across the GWB into bruckner for the hunts point etc you are too busy to be dealing with GPS. You would have a list of streets to use and follow it. Getting out of there involves going another way now that the city has reconfigured some of the streets to calm down on the hundreds of truckers coming and going at all hours of the night.

The reason we don't "Rely" on GPS is self evident. There was a trucker in Arkansas who was led into the deep woods and across a 100 year old 6 ton bridge which immediately broke and drowned his rig and load into the river below. Now him, his company are being sued by the state because the driver blindly followed the GPS device. Not very professional at all and a utter failure. You can get into trouble.

Remember that I am not against technology, I have lived half my life before there was anything at all like technology you could use today. I think it was about 1998 when we had our first phones, GPS and computers, cameras etc. Anything before that we had absolutely nothing but your own mind, pen and paper. We had our first internet in 1992 and so on.

The first computer anything was put into trucks after 1994. Usually for speed enforcement to prevent us from letting her roll and make up some time. Its since evolved from there into today where its painfully obvious that anything you do in real time against company policy (Fail to wear a mask etc) can be recorded and used to punish or fire you.
 

Calvin

In Hazzard County
Super Moderator
Premium Member
Sometime in the last year, my company finally input GPS map in the driver's handheld device. The mechanic installed the cradle that charges the device on the route. It's not 100% reliable but it does help some "blind routes".
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
Sometime in the last year, my company finally input GPS map in the driver's handheld device. The mechanic installed the cradle that charges the device on the route. It's not 100% reliable but it does help some "blind routes".
We can now track our UPS deliveries. Which can be frustrating when you're on the "wrong side" of the road. The UPS trucks come oh so close to my apartment complex, like the neighborhood behind it and the office building across the small connecting road. Our road is on the backend of the delivery route. :(
 

Calvin

In Hazzard County
Super Moderator
Premium Member
We can now track our UPS deliveries. Which can be frustrating when you're on the "wrong side" of the road. The UPS trucks come oh so close to my apartment complex, like the neighborhood behind it and the office building across the small connecting road. Our road is on the backend of the delivery route. :(
I’ve heard stories of drivers when customers track their packages showing where the truck is and how many stops before delivery. Some crazy inpatient customers stalk the driver demanding the package. It’s a dangerous case as some threatened with a gun.

It’s a bad idea and put drivers safety in jeopardy.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
I’ve heard stories of drivers when customers track their packages showing where the truck is and how many stops before delivery. Some crazy inpatient customers stalk the driver demanding the package. It’s a dangerous case as some threatened with a gun.

It’s a bad idea and put drivers safety in jeopardy.
I believe it. But it's nice to have an idea, once you learn their delivery pattern, how soon your package will be delivered, especially if you have concerns about the package "being left out in the open".
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
I’ve heard stories of drivers when customers track their packages showing where the truck is and how many stops before delivery. Some crazy inpatient customers stalk the driver demanding the package. It’s a dangerous case as some threatened with a gun.

It’s a bad idea and put drivers safety in jeopardy.

That is crazy. customers need to learn to be patient and wait for their turns.
 
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