Advice For Helping Deaf Loved One Recover from Injury

Notsounique

New Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2022
Messages
2
Reaction score
1
Hi! My loved one is profoundly deaf and has suffered a brain injury and is currently in a coma. She is a teenager, so we’re hoping she can recover. However, the medical staff doesn’t seem to take into account the fact that’s she’s deaf when treating her. We primarily communicate in ASL. And ASL is her first and primary language. Medical staff keep saying “talk to her.” But we know she can’t hear us. Anyone have any insight into alternative ways to communicate with a unconscious Deaf loved one? We are trying to sign in her hand, but her ASL was visual and not tactile, so we don’t know if it’s actually helping. Any experiences, thoughts, or feedback is welcomed! Thanks so much!
 

EllietheEncourager

Active Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
160
Reaction score
85
It sounds like you're doing all you can; you are showing up and showing her love. "talk to her" seems like blanket advise not personalized to her. I've seen a deaf/hearing couple say "I love you" in the dark by pressing the hand sign (which is pretty distinctive) into the others back, shoulder, chest. That's the most anyone can do, let her know she is loved while she fights. Maybe things like brushing her hair or painting her nails. tactile ways of letting her know you are there could do the same? I wish her a speedy recovery and you all the very best.
 

EllietheEncourager

Active Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
160
Reaction score
85
I just ended a relationship that lasted for 6yrs, I’m going through a terrible depression, I need help and advice tips
I'm so sorry to know you are hurting; 6 years of dedication to someone is a long time.

Looking at yourself and dedicating the same amount of love to your own happiness is a way forward. You are enough of a person without a relationship. You will be happy again, both by yourself or with someone new. Getting out to do the things you love is a great way to find like minded/hearted people. Don't wallow in the pain too long. People have all kinds of silly rules for how long your should wait; I used to wait a while but then I realized...I already spent x time on something that ultimately didn't serve me. Why should I not seek what I'm searching for; no time like the present. It's a gift that we could stop receiving at any time.

You're not alone in your grief. All the best to you.
 

zephren

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2015
Messages
741
Reaction score
278
I'm so sorry to know you are hurting; 6 years of dedication to someone is a long time.

Looking at yourself and dedicating the same amount of love to your own happiness is a way forward. You are enough of a person without a relationship. You will be happy again, both by yourself or with someone new. Getting out to do the things you love is a great way to find like minded/hearted people. Don't wallow in the pain too long. People have all kinds of silly rules for how long your should wait; I used to wait a while but then I realized...I already spent x time on something that ultimately didn't serve me. Why should I not seek what I'm searching for; no time like the present. It's a gift that we could stop receiving at any time.

You're not alone in your grief. All the best to you.
Hi Ellie,

I think you posted that in the wrong thread.
 

zephren

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2015
Messages
741
Reaction score
278
Hi! My loved one is profoundly deaf and has suffered a brain injury and is currently in a coma. She is a teenager, so we’re hoping she can recover. However, the medical staff doesn’t seem to take into account the fact that’s she’s deaf when treating her. We primarily communicate in ASL. And ASL is her first and primary language. Medical staff keep saying “talk to her.” But we know she can’t hear us. Anyone have any insight into alternative ways to communicate with a unconscious Deaf loved one? We are trying to sign in her hand, but her ASL was visual and not tactile, so we don’t know if it’s actually helping. Any experiences, thoughts, or feedback is welcomed! Thanks so much!
Sorry you are going through this. I agree with other posters that the tactile approach is good communication option both through general touch and signing on her hands and body. Even if she is not used to tactile ASL is not something she if familiar with, it would still give some language input to stimulate the brain and hopefully she will eventually be able to make sense of it. I hope she recovers soon.
 

Nita Thomas

Active Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2016
Messages
131
Reaction score
47
Hi! My loved one is profoundly deaf and has suffered a brain injury and is currently in a coma. She is a teenager, so we’re hoping she can recover. However, the medical staff doesn’t seem to take into account the fact that’s she’s deaf when treating her. We primarily communicate in ASL. And ASL is her first and primary language. Medical staff keep saying “talk to her.” But we know she can’t hear us. Anyone have any insight into alternative ways to communicate with a unconscious Deaf loved one? We are trying to sign in her hand, but her ASL was visual and not tactile, so we don’t know if it’s actually helping. Any experiences, thoughts, or feedback is welcomed! Thanks so much!
Comatose do many things so even though she is deaf, do orally speak and sing too because they tend to have unique out of the body, supernatural abilities. If you can hold her hand and write into it try doing that too.
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2007
Messages
2,800
Reaction score
513
I'm sorry to hear about your daughter. Does she have any favorite doll or animal? Her favorite blanket or any object? It so, place it in her hand or brush it across her face.
 

EllietheEncourager

Active Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Messages
160
Reaction score
85
That's a great idea, Barbaro. I hope it helps. In the same vein, what about favorite smells? Olfactory is the most powerful since for memory recall; that could be soothing.

Also, how is she doing Notsounique?
 
Top