26 states join Obama health care lawsuit in Fla

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rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
PENSACOLA, Fla. – Six more states joined a lawsuit in Florida against President Obama's health care overhaul on Tuesday, meaning more than half of the country is challenging the law.

The announcement was made as House members in Washington, led by Republicans, debated whether to repeal the law.

The six additional states, all with Republican attorneys general, joined Florida and 19 others in the legal action, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi said.

"It sends a strong message that more than half of the states consider the health care law unconstitutional and are willing to fight it in court," she said in a statement.

The states claim the health care law is unconstitutional and violates people's rights by forcing them to buy health insurance by 2014 or face penalties.

Government attorneys have said the states do not have standing to challenge the law and want the case dismissed.

Lawsuits have been filed elsewhere. A federal judge in Virginia ruled in December that the insurance-purchase mandate was unconstitutional, though two other federal judges have upheld the requirement. It's expected the Supreme Court will ultimately have to resolve the issue.

"It is important to note that two of the three courts that have reviewed this law on the merits have found it constitutional, and those decisions _as well as two others the government prevailed on — are pending in courts of appeal. At the same time, trial courts in additional cases have dismissed numerous challenges on jurisdictional and other grounds that have not been appealed," Justice Department spokeswoman Tracy Schmaler said.

Meanwhile, the White House dismissed an expected vote on repealing the law, saying the Republicans' push was not a serious legislative effort. Democrats have a majority in the Senate and they have said they will block repeal in that chamber.

In the Florida case, the states also argue the federal government is violating the Constitution by forcing a mandate on the states without providing money to pay for it. They say the new law gives the state's the impossible choice of accepting the new costs or forfeiting federal Medicaid funding.

Florida U.S. District Judge Roger Vinson could rule later this month whether he will grant a summary judgment in favor of the states or the Obama administration without a trial.

Florida's former Republican Attorney General Bill McCollum filed the lawsuit just minutes after President Barack Obama signed the 10-year, $938 billion health care bill into law in March. He chose a court in Pensacola, one of Florida's most conservative cities. The nation's most influential small business lobby, the National Federation of Independent Business, also joined the suit.

Joining the coalition in the Florida case were: Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Ohio, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

The other states that are suing are Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Idaho, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Washington.

26 states join Obama health care lawsuit in Fla. - Yahoo! News
 

jillio

New Member
No kidding. Not to mention which all of the latest polls show that a majority of Americans are not in favor of revision. :cool2: Not to mention this 26 is a minority of the states.:giggle:
 

TXgolfer

Dream Weaver
Premium Member
No kidding. Not to mention which all of the latest polls show that a majority of Americans are not in favor of revision. :cool2: Not to mention this 26 is a minority of the states.:giggle:

A) I thought you didn't believe in polls
B) To which polls are you referring?
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
We have 50 states.

1/2 of 50 is 25.

25 states would be a tie.

24 states would be a minority.

26 states would be a majority.
 

jillio

New Member
A) I thought you didn't believe in polls
B) To which polls are you referring?

Again, the ones I saw on the news. Try watching it sometime.

Never said I didn't believe in polls. I said that polls had no predictive value. Quite different.
 

jillio

New Member
You mean relativism has even changed the meaning of majority? Whoa!

Might as well throw away the calculator.

Relativism changes the meaning of anything that is interpreted literally. That is what relativism is all about.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Relativism changes the meaning of anything that is interpreted literally. That is what relativism is all about.
Yes. That's what you did.

Literal meaning of majority:

ma·jor·i·ty
   /məˈdʒɔrɪti, -ˈdʒɒr-/ Show Spelled[muh-jawr-i-tee, -jor-] Show IPA
–noun, plural -ties.
1. the greater part or number; the number larger than half the total ( opposed to minority): the majority of the population.

2. a number of voters or votes, jurors, or others in agreement, constituting more than half of the total number.

3. the amount by which the greater number, as of votes, surpasses the remainder ( distinguished from plurality).

4. the party or faction with the majority vote: The Democratic party is the majority.

5. the state or time of being of full legal age: to attain one's majority.

6. the military rank or office of a major.

dictionary.com



You changed the meaning of majority.

Either that or you made a math error.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Yes. That's what you did.

Literal meaning of majority:

ma·jor·i·ty
   /məˈdʒɔrɪti, -ˈdʒɒr-/ Show Spelled[muh-jawr-i-tee, -jor-] Show IPA
–noun, plural -ties.
1. the greater part or number; the number larger than half the total ( opposed to minority): the majority of the population.

2. a number of voters or votes, jurors, or others in agreement, constituting more than half of the total number.

3. the amount by which the greater number, as of votes, surpasses the remainder ( distinguished from plurality).

4. the party or faction with the majority vote: The Democratic party is the majority.

5. the state or time of being of full legal age: to attain one's majority.

6. the military rank or office of a major.

dictionary.com



You changed the meaning of majority.

Either that or you made a math error.

Hmmm. Of the 26 states, which are blue and which are red? I have no idea, and wonder if that calls for a unified theory of relativity to rear its head.
 

Texan Guy

Active Member
Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Idaho, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Washington.

6 more: Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Ohio, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

9 states are blue and against Obamacare...well, that's pretty a lot for blues to me.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Idaho, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Washington.

6 more: Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Ohio, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

9 states are blue and against Obamacare...well, that's pretty a lot for blues to me.

Thanks, Texan Guy. So, it sounds like twice as many red states as blue states are filing suit. "Nuff said. :lol:
 
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