Why are deaf people against those with hearing learning asl?

Vosgedzam

Active Member
Ugh, I hate it when a post is written as one super huge paragraph. That's just too much. I can't even tell when a new idea begins. It's too much.
Tell me about it! I'm in some online courses at a college, yet some students would make a post that's one paragraph that's equal to about 2 pages without any break in it. I immediately discard the post and makes a comment, I refuse to read your super huge paragraph till you properly break them into the correct paragraphs as it's intended to be.
 

sonocativo

Well-Known Member
Tell me about it! I'm in some online courses at a college, yet some students would make a post that's one paragraph that's equal to about 2 pages without any break in it. I immediately discard the post and makes a comment, I refuse to read your super huge paragraph till you properly break them into the correct paragraphs as it's intended to be.
sentences.
 

ukcat1

New Member
I can understand Deaf being bored by hearing people trying to learn ASL. If I were the parent of a deaf child, I would want all the hearing children in the neighborhood to know ASL so my child would have playmates. I am taking ASL as Donovan Scholar (+age 65) at a local college. I get excited when I can under some of the closed captioning on the news. But, I am reluctant to go intrude at a deaf coffee because I feel that they don't want to be bothered with me.
I want to teach my young niece some signs so as she ages she can learn the language properly.
 

sonocativo

Well-Known Member
I can understand Deaf being bored by hearing people trying to learn ASL. If I were the parent of a deaf child, I would want all the hearing children in the neighborhood to know ASL so my child would have playmates. I am taking ASL as Donovan Scholar (+age 65) at a local college. I get excited when I can under some of the closed captioning on the news. But, I am reluctant to go intrude at a deaf coffee because I feel that they don't want to be bothered with me.
I want to teach my young niece some signs so as she ages she can learn the language properly.
could even be an interpreter in the future.
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
If you are only fluent in written English then you ARE NOT on the same level of English aa someone with hearing who fluently speaks, hears and reads it. That's why fluency means-you can understand and fully communicate in all aspects of the language
I dont believe you can draw comparisons or 'levels' between written and spoken English. There are many fluent English 'speakers' who can't understand or 'get' poetry or Shakespeare but are still considered fluent in English. There are many who are fluent in English Arts and Literature who are not able to verbalise in spoken English.
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
I have lived in many countries over the span of my life emerging in several different cultures and languages. Drawing from my own experience, arriving into a new country, culture, language etc., you are better received and welcomed as a newcomer when you respect the people who are born and bred there. Do your homework and don't be so 'green' or arrogant. So many Hearing people approach Deaf people in the wrong way. You cant understand another language and culture from the platform or mindset of your own mother language and culture. You need to view things from the mindset of the people and culture of whom you wish to assimulate. Otherwise, you start on the wrong foot and unwittingly offend.
 

Presbyter

Member
I recently began learning ASL because my baby brother was born deaf and I want to be able to interact with him on his level and encourage him to embrace himself, but whenever I bring up that I'm learning ASL to a deaf person they seem to get angry at me and act as if I shouldn't even dare try to learn ASL. Why is this? Is it a coping mechanism they use or do they just tend to think ASL belongs to them?
my father pulled me out of a deaf school into local 2nd grade elemental school. I've never been in 1st grade. My only wishes my father had done was to get me into typing and use the TTY. Their wish was for me to hear on phones I can't hear on. now with the technologies available, I can't type.


Parents: get your kids typing!!!
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I recently began learning ASL because my baby brother was born deaf and I want to be able to interact with him on his level and encourage him to embrace himself, but whenever I bring up that I'm learning ASL to a deaf person they seem to get angry at me and act as if I shouldn't even dare try to learn ASL. Why is this? Is it a coping mechanism they use or do they just tend to think ASL belongs to them?
I don't know why, but it bothered me when students in ASL classes came up to me talking in ASL and I was a lip reader. They wouldn't talk to me much unless it was something they were learning in their ASL class. I would not respond to them in ASL because I knew none.

I can only tell you to start slow and learn a bit more about anyone deaf you encounter before you come full force trying ASL on any deaf person. Remember too that not all deaf people use ASL and it is important to find out how they like to communicate. I thought that this is taught in ASL class about different ways deaf people communicate, but unfortunately, I don't think it sticks...
 
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