Why are deaf people against those with hearing learning asl?

Vosgedzam

Active Member
From my long-time observation at many social events, the forums like AD, and the other scenes. I think some of deaf people do feel as if they are approached by the learners rather as an educational tool to help the learners to improve their second language than having us, the deaf people to be approached as the human beings to be acknowledged that we as the deaf people do have a unique language, a unique culture, and many others that make us stand out in the crowd. I know a bit of French, and no one will see me running up to a French claiming I'm learning French!!

However, I as a deaf person often have to remind the fellow deaf people who are very fluent in ASL like me that we do need to be patient, to be friendly, and be welcoming the ASL learners to share our unique language. We also must keep in the mind about the truly sad cases of many deaf children/adults that do not sign at all for Pete's sake. Many of them ARE not at fault for having the hearing parents that refuse or not even bother to learn ASL to communicate with their deaf children. What's even worse some of them forbid their deaf children to learn ASL as God intended us to have as our natural language! If a deaf person that doesn't know ASL approach me and wants to learn ASL who am I to tell them to piss off?

I do encourage many hearing learners to continue learning ASL to gain them as our valuable ally in our endless war with the bastard organizations like Alexander Graham Bell (AGB) who wants to eradicate ASL for good. Yes, I'm selfish, so sue me.
 

Nix Snow

Member
From my long-time observation at many social events, the forums like AD, and the other scenes. I think some of deaf people do feel as if they are approached by the learners rather as an educational tool to help the learners to improve their second language than having us, the deaf people to be approached as the human beings to be acknowledged that we as the deaf people do have a unique language, a unique culture, and many others that make us stand out in the crowd. I know a bit of French, and no one will see me running up to a French claiming I'm learning French!!

However, I as a deaf person often have to remind the fellow deaf people who are very fluent in ASL like me that we do need to be patient, to be friendly, and be welcoming the ASL learners to share our unique language. We also must keep in the mind about the truly sad cases of many deaf children/adults that do not sign at all for Pete's sake. Many of them ARE not at fault for having the hearing parents that refuse or not even bother to learn ASL to communicate with their deaf children. What's even worse some of them forbid their deaf children to learn ASL as God intended us to have as our natural language! If a deaf person that doesn't know ASL approach me and wants to learn ASL who am I to tell them to piss off?

I do encourage many hearing learners to continue learning ASL to gain them as our valuable ally in our endless war with the bastard organizations like Alexander Graham Bell (AGB) who wants to eradicate ASL for good. Yes, I'm selfish, so sue me.
And again, I learn something new. I never knew about AGB. What a tool. You know he just wanted more money. -_-
 

Dolores

Member
Definitely! It's the same where I'm from. When I was little, my brothers and I were the only kids in our whole apartment complex who spoke English. The Spanish speaking population is huge here. I lost my hearing when I was 6 in a car accident and before then I spoke about as much Spanish as I did English from all my friends. I haven't learned much since since all my focus was on speaking and reading and understanding English, but I still get a fair deal of it.

Anyway, everything you say makes sense. Going to Deaf events to meet new people is the best way to go. You definitely have good intentions so I think you're good to go. I just wanted to explain where some of the opposition I think you perceived comes from, please don't take it personally! I still feel awkward at Deaf events sometimes because my ASL isn't great. It's getting better though. I'm applying to Gallaudet so I need to get it up to speed!
Aw thank you! That makes me feel better. Im going to keep trying to go to deaf events. Maybe there will be some good ones come new year. Hope you get into Gallaudet, when you do you have to come back and tell us all about it!
 

Nix Snow

Member
Oh lol. I thought it was an actually book
LOL. Kind of a forum thing. Where someone writes too long of a post, we call it a book :)
I think it's more like... "Wow! You wrote so much, it's like a book!" Kinda thing. :P

I have always said 'book' when I write too much myself lol I get a little carried away sometimes and have to catch myself, so reading other people's 'books' never bothered me much.
 

zeefour

Active Member
From my long-time observation at many social events, the forums like AD, and the other scenes. I think some of deaf people do feel as if they are approached by the learners rather as an educational tool to help the learners to improve their second language than having us, the deaf people to be approached as the human beings to be acknowledged that we as the deaf people do have a unique language, a unique culture, and many others that make us stand out in the crowd. I know a bit of French, and no one will see me running up to a French claiming I'm learning French!!

However, I as a deaf person often have to remind the fellow deaf people who are very fluent in ASL like me that we do need to be patient, to be friendly, and be welcoming the ASL learners to share our unique language. We also must keep in the mind about the truly sad cases of many deaf children/adults that do not sign at all for Pete's sake. Many of them ARE not at fault for having the hearing parents that refuse or not even bother to learn ASL to communicate with their deaf children. What's even worse some of them forbid their deaf children to learn ASL as God intended us to have as our natural language! If a deaf person that doesn't know ASL approach me and wants to learn ASL who am I to tell them to piss off?

I do encourage many hearing learners to continue learning ASL to gain them as our valuable ally in our endless war with the bastard organizations like Alexander Graham Bell (AGB) who wants to eradicate ASL for good. Yes, I'm selfish, so sue me.
Thank you so much! My parents weren't against learning sign, but I lost my hearing at age 6 before I started 1st grade. This was the early 90s and way before bi-bi was a thing. I had language skills so the need to get me somewhere quick wasn't an issue, and in my little mountain town we didn't even have our own special ed department in our school district, we shared resources in a co-op called Mountain BOCES (Board of Cooperative Ed Services) with about 6 other mountain counties. Needless to say when I had an aid, we used signed English. As an adult I'm taking it on myself to learn ASL properly, but I'm definitely one of those Deaf/HoH people who will join a conversation in ASL signing "Sorry I learn I !"
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
There's a part of me that wonders if this is an expectation of Deaf culture. The times that I've had issues around people being bothered by the fact that I'm learning ASL it has been in Deaf spaces. Like when I'm the minority hearing person in a group of Deaf people. That could very easily be because I'm "invading" their space. And I kind of get that. Who wants an outsider coming in to your space when you're trying to just have time with others who are like you. I can understand that kind of mentality. Like, some Deaf people go to Deaf events to get away from hearing people and have a time when they feel empowered around others like them and there's this hearing person who's there trying to learn and adding this uncomfortable aspect to their personal bonding time. I understand that.

When I've encountered Deaf people out in public, either at my job, or online, or at a mixed Deaf/hearing gathering, they're always really happy and excited that I'm learning. And I can understand that too. So many Deaf people experience isolation, especially in areas where there isn't a larger Deaf community. I've had people tell me there have been times where they've gone days without communicating with someone because they're surrounded by hearing people who can't sign. And to have someone capable of signing whether they're Deaf or not is a chance for some social interaction that they enjoy. I often get appreciation from Deaf patients at my job for the same reasons. They encounter so many professionals with no ability to communicate with them that they like that they can at least have a conversation with me.

So I think you're going to find people on different sides of this argument, and you're going to find some people's opinions change depending on the circumstance.
 

zeefour

Active Member
There's a part of me that wonders if this is an expectation of Deaf culture. The times that I've had issues around people being bothered by the fact that I'm learning ASL it has been in Deaf spaces. Like when I'm the minority hearing person in a group of Deaf people. That could very easily be because I'm "invading" their space. And I kind of get that. Who wants an outsider coming in to your space when you're trying to just have time with others who are like you. I can understand that kind of mentality. Like, some Deaf people go to Deaf events to get away from hearing people and have a time when they feel empowered around others like them and there's this hearing person who's there trying to learn and adding this uncomfortable aspect to their personal bonding time. I understand that.

When I've encountered Deaf people out in public, either at my job, or online, or at a mixed Deaf/hearing gathering, they're always really happy and excited that I'm learning. And I can understand that too. So many Deaf people experience isolation, especially in areas where there isn't a larger Deaf community. I've had people tell me there have been times where they've gone days without communicating with someone because they're surrounded by hearing people who can't sign. And to have someone capable of signing whether they're Deaf or not is a chance for some social interaction that they enjoy. I often get appreciation from Deaf patients at my job for the same reasons. They encounter so many professionals with no ability to communicate with them that they like that they can at least have a conversation with me.

So I think you're going to find people on different sides of this argument, and you're going to find some people's opinions change depending on the circumstance.

Great point about the differences between a "Deaf space" like a Deaf event opposed to just meeting people out in public (or hearing spaces really). I know there's different views from different Deaf/HoH (which is always true we're all individual people just like hearing with different ideas personalities and perspectives). But still, it's a good point .
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
The member, Shane. Further up he said some stuff, and then another member said it was too long to read. I was referring to his long post.
LOL. Kind of a forum thing. Where someone writes too long of a post, we call it a book :)
I have been around for a number of years and don't remember running across that.
I call it "writing a novel"... I've used that term on both online forums etc and in writing actual letters on paper (or typing one now)... I tend to write "novels" when writing letters lol.

I've run across this in many forms over the years online be it bulletin boards in the old Prodigy for DOS days, AOL to here, FaceBook, other forums I'm on...
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
I call it "writing a novel"... I've used that term on both online forums etc and in writing actual letters on paper (or typing one now)... I tend to write "novels" when writing letters lol.

I've run across this in many forms over the years online be it bulletin boards in the old Prodigy for DOS days, AOL to here, FaceBook, other forums I'm on...
I've seen the "writing a book" phrase used when a post is not just too long, but often full of unnecessary detail or not broken into readable paragraphs. It usually expresses one's exasperation with having to dig thru the text for the meaty parts.

Like: "I only wanted a yes or no answer--you didn't have to write a book." :lol:
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
Ugh, I hate it when a post is written as one super huge paragraph. That's just too much. I can't even tell when a new idea begins. It's too much.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
The Deaf community in my area has regular get togethers and activities that are open to all signers, hearing or deaf, beginner or fluent, doesn't matter. All are welcome.

Of course, if hearing ASL students attend, I recommend they not stay in a group to themselves but split up and mingle. Also, behave as you would at any social gathering. That is, show an interest in other people and their lives, join in the activity (bowling, crafts, fishing, eating or whatever), and be willing to share your lives. Don't treat anyone as your personal tutor but learn thru observation and participation.
 
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