What is the one thing which would make the biggest difference in the quality of your life?

MDD

New Member
With technology as it is today there must be some more which can be done to help with the inclusion that the deaf deserve. I would love to make a difference!
 

vegandreamer

Active Member
A devise that vibrates with sound that would help with road crossings. I used to have such a device but they stopped making it. Too many people opt for CI"s instead.
 

sammiller525

New Member
A speech transcriber, or some device that creates captions of whatever is being said, but with holograms.

A device with which i could connect my mind with another person’s. I’d show them what it’s like, being as deaf as i am, watching them whisper amongst themselves.

Last wish: some way to convince people to just BE PATIENT with me i love to chat/sign/rap/listen, but all they care about is fast communication. Lazy
 

PinballWiz

Member
Other than something to actually restore natural hearing, I agree with a powerful and accurate speech transcription technology. I’ve tried several things along those lines but they simply aren’t reliable/accurate enough to be useful. I tried one recently during a conference call with a studio quality mic next to the phone speaker, and the transcribed output ranged from terrible, to downright comical. That’d be my prime wish.
 

crimevault

New Member
Other than something to actually restore natural hearing, I agree with a powerful and accurate speech transcription technology. I’ve tried several things along those lines but they simply aren’t reliable/accurate enough to be useful. I tried one recently during a conference call with a studio quality mic next to the phone speaker, and the transcribed output ranged from terrible, to downright comical. That’d be my prime wish.
I don't have any hearing problems, but I make all my YouTube videos with the correct captions, removing the Auto-Captions from that crappy YouTube bot. I believe YouTube should make people upload the correct captions, or reward them in some way. People create content with "normal" people in mind, so I think education would be the best technology right now, and it can be done in like 1 month or so.
 

crimevault

New Member
Like glasses with voice recognition software that automatically transcribed what someone said into a screen in your glasses.
The technology exists, but it's kinda bad right now. For example, the YouTube auto-captions bot that can write what you say, but most of the time it gets the words wrong. It's very hard, because of dialects, words pronounced differently by people and background noise. I believe communication is not the main issue here since you can text, write on something to communicate with someone who doesn't know the sign language, if you really need to. Again, I don't have any hearing problems, but I am curious: "What happens if someone with hearing problems needs assistance and wants to call 911? Is there a service available for them?"
I would probably invent a device that vibrates on the car horns, ambulance/police sounds, aggressive dog barks, loud noises nearby (like explosions, gunshots, someone yelling at you to stop for some reason, etc.). Also, gas leak alarm, knocks on the door and doorbell sounds. It's hard to think of things like this if you don't have hearing impairments, but I'm pretty sure you guys lack the safety gadgets more than you do on communication ones.
Now I have a question: What would someone like me should know about hearing impaired people and what could I do to make things easier for them?
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
Me too. Not sure if it is state-wide, but it is in the county I live in.
I think it goes county by county. I know that we have it in my county, but the neighboring county, which is more rural, doesn't have it. I think I read at one point that there are some states that have it state wide. Vermont I think was one of them.
 
I think being respected and heard by the Hearing Community. Part of it, is not being able to communicate as before with friends, in doctor's offices, even in stores and banks. I always liked to talk, but now when I do, and they start responding, I can't hear them, so interaction is abruptly lost, unless I fake it for one or two more sentences.
 

Swedeafa

Member
The technology exists, but it's kinda bad right now. For example, the YouTube auto-captions bot that can write what you say, but most of the time it gets the words wrong. It's very hard, because of dialects, words pronounced differently by people and background noise. I believe communication is not the main issue here since you can text, write on something to communicate with someone who doesn't know the sign language, if you really need to. Again, I don't have any hearing problems, but I am curious: "What happens if someone with hearing problems needs assistance and wants to call 911? Is there a service available for them?"
I would probably invent a device that vibrates on the car horns, ambulance/police sounds, aggressive dog barks, loud noises nearby (like explosions, gunshots, someone yelling at you to stop for some reason, etc.). Also, gas leak alarm, knocks on the door and doorbell sounds. It's hard to think of things like this if you don't have hearing impairments, but I'm pretty sure you guys lack the safety gadgets more than you do on communication ones.
Now I have a question: What would someone like me should know about hearing impaired people and what could I do to make things easier for them?
Well, have you ever heard of Deaf getting killed or hurt because they couldn’t hear? We actually don’t get into dangerous situations very often, due to lack of hearing. There was in fact a Deaf woman in my country who just happened to get in the way for a shooting in the 80:s. But that’s such a unusual case that it’s famous because of it.

Where I live I can communicate using text messages to 112 (equivalent of 911), or call through text relay (possible through an app on the phone) or video relay.

What is a much more severe problem, is that there is very little elder care with personnel fluent in sign language. When old persons are deprived of communication and company, their health declines and they do die earlier than they should. Dementia is likely also connected to isolation.

Communication with non urgent health care is also poor. We do have web-systems that can be used for making appointments or following up on a visit, but the way they are created makes it impossible to have a dialog with the health care personnel. You cannot reply to messages, or send information back and forth. Moreover, the phone systems cannot handle calls through text or video relay. As HoH I also often get worse information compared to hearing because the doctor is turned towards a computer screen while talking, which means I miss information. I do ask for clear communication and repeats, but that often leads to stressed personnel trying to summarize, simplify or shorten the information. Those things are much more a health risk.

Another thing that might contribute to shorter lives or make them harder, is acces to work. I have a great job, but there constantly is a fear of losing or not getting a job due to deafness. Not having employment, means less money and poorer health. I honestly think work place interpreting should be tax funded and free for the client and employer. It’s just too important for people’s lives to not provide access. Also combined with better education for Deaf and HoH children and young adults.
 

Sean James

New Member
I would love if I could find a SEE course for Hard of Hearing! Every couse I've tried to find is geared towards hearing people not LDAs or Hard of Hearing adults.
 

ZeusAergia

New Member
that special ipad program my "speech" therapist (deaf school teacher) was working on for a combo of my autism and asl needs. insurance bailed out on that. that wouldve been great for sure. plus the thing a dr of mine has in his office i like on an ipad. unlike some interpreter programs, his allowed one hearing interpreter and a deaf one to interact with me. the deaf one had to tell the hearing interpreter what i was trying to say for her to tell my dr. it took some serious work and was a successful appointment. it was going nowhere fast with just the hearing interpreter and i was thinking of just giving up on the appointment. when i thought of asking if theres anyone deaf available she could talk to (idk how i thought of that) there was and he quickly realized i suffered brain injury and then the whole appointment made sense in 5 minutes after we tried for 45 to get anywhere but nowhere fast. so all of that in one ipad would be terrific for me. life would be much better. it would be a prize for me and who knows how many others.
 
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