To Ask For An Interpreter... Or Not? Advice Wanted.

#1
So, I typically have a mild-to-moderate loss (mild in low frequencies, moderate in mid and high) but an episode of glue ear in my left ear left me completely deaf for most of Thursday with some sound returning by the evening.

On Friday my hearing had returned even more and my air conduction levels came in mostly at 65-70dB. Since then it seems to be fluctuating between about that and worse.

I really struggled to understand what the ENT nurse and audiologist were saying to me on the Friday because they seemed to lack deaf awareness. We tried to point out that I needed to lipread but he kept insisting it wasn't much different to my usual hearing and only my perception and kept giving my wife dirty looks for signing what he was saying to me while he was talking about my results from behind me and doing microsuction.

I am going to get my hearing aids adjusted because at the moment the left aid is not loud enough but my wife might not be able to get out of work on time to come with me.

I'm worried that I won't be able to hear what the audiologist is telling me, especially as this particular audiology department seem to have a dedication towards doing the absolute minimum levels of care unless you actively call them up on it. But I also don't want to seem ridiculous because I speak very well and would only need an interpreter to sign to me. Especially as they seem to think I ought to be better at understanding speech than I actually am. (I haven't had a speech test at this place and they haven't transferred my notes from my previous one.)
 

Calvin

In Hazzard County
Super Moderator
Premium Member
#2
Recently, I had a Dr appointment and they provided interpreter through VRI (Video Remote Interpreting) service and it really helped a lot. I don't know if many hospitals carry that.
 
#3
Mine orders them through the local deaf centre but I know that I'm not a typical interpreter candidate... and frankly the department doesn't even have a visual display for whose appointment it is. I asked for a pager but they don't have them for appointments, only the drop in service. :/
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
#4
It's up to you but believe me it's fine to have an interpreter if you are able to speak for yourself. I've done it- did it recently at a job interview (whether or not it helped or hindered my chances I'll never know). Interpreters should be able to adapt to any situation regarding deaf people and their preferences/needs.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
#5
It's up to you but believe me it's fine to have an interpreter if you are able to speak for yourself. I've done it- did it recently at a job interview (whether or not it helped or hindered my chances I'll never know). Interpreters should be able to adapt to any situation regarding deaf people and their preferences/needs.
Agreed.

It shouldn't be any problem for the terp as long as you explain to the terp what you want to do before the assignment begins.
 
#6
So, I typically have a mild-to-moderate loss (mild in low frequencies, moderate in mid and high) but an episode of glue ear in my left ear left me completely deaf for most of Thursday with some sound returning by the evening.

On Friday my hearing had returned even more and my air conduction levels came in mostly at 65-70dB. Since then it seems to be fluctuating between about that and worse.

I really struggled to understand what the ENT nurse and audiologist were saying to me on the Friday because they seemed to lack deaf awareness. We tried to point out that I needed to lipread but he kept insisting it wasn't much different to my usual hearing and only my perception and kept giving my wife dirty looks for signing what he was saying to me while he was talking about my results from behind me and doing microsuction.

I am going to get my hearing aids adjusted because at the moment the left aid is not loud enough but my wife might not be able to get out of work on time to come with me.

I'm worried that I won't be able to hear what the audiologist is telling me, especially as this particular audiology department seem to have a dedication towards doing the absolute minimum levels of care unless you actively call them up on it. But I also don't want to seem ridiculous because I speak very well and would only need an interpreter to sign to me. Especially as they seem to think I ought to be better at understanding speech than I actually am. (I haven't had a speech test at this place and they haven't transferred my notes from my previous one.)
I know this topic is old. I did a search "interpreter" and ended up in this old topic. My biggest question is: "in what why is a wife allowed to interpret for you?". how do we draw the line in having a wife to do the interpretation for free or hiring a costly certified interpreter? in most cases, can we have a spouse to interpret on what is being said? Its understandable to have a licensed medical interpreter in case of legal battles. it seems to me that having a family member or a friend to do the interpretation in a reasonable accommodation is allowable. some might want to be responsible for what is being said and hire an certified interpreter.
 
#7
I know this topic is old. I did a search "interpreter" and ended up in this old topic. My biggest question is: "in what why is a wife allowed to interpret for you?". how do we draw the line in having a wife to do the interpretation for free or hiring a costly certified interpreter? in most cases, can we have a spouse to interpret on what is being said? Its understandable to have a licensed medical interpreter in case of legal battles. it seems to me that having a family member or a friend to do the interpretation in a reasonable accommodation is allowable. some might want to be responsible for what is being said and hire an certified interpreter.
But a relatives role is quite different to an interpreter. They are there to support you, not to translate. Not only is interpreting not their profession, which means they will make mistakes and they cannot possibly be objective since they know you. If someone starts cursing at you and calling you names, will a husband or wife really interpret exactly what’s said or will they try to protect you and take your side. Should the wife or husband not be allowed to hug you or cry if the doctor said you have a serious condition? How could they possibly be expected to be focused on findings the correct medical terms about an upcoming procedure, if they are worried about you? Or if a child is interpreting a parents’ meeting at school where the aim is to discuss the child’s behavior in school. That’s just not the right way to do it. If you can get an objective interpreter, do so and allow your friends and family be exactly that.

By the way, if I was treated like that at an audiologist office, I would definitely go somewhere else. It’s just awful. Hope the OP did get an interpreter and did get proper support with the hearing problem.
 
#8
But a relatives role is quite different to an interpreter. They are there to support you, not to translate. Not only is interpreting not their profession, which means they will make mistakes and they cannot possibly be objective since they know you. If someone starts cursing at you and calling you names, will a husband or wife really interpret exactly what’s said or will they try to protect you and take your side. Should the wife or husband not be allowed to hug you or cry if the doctor said you have a serious condition? How could they possibly be expected to be focused on findings the correct medical terms about an upcoming procedure, if they are worried about you? Or if a child is interpreting a parents’ meeting at school where the aim is to discuss the child’s behavior in school. That’s just not the right way to do it. If you can get an objective interpreter, do so and allow your friends and family be exactly that.

By the way, if I was treated like that at an audiologist office, I would definitely go somewhere else. It’s just awful. Hope the OP did get an interpreter and did get proper support with the hearing problem.
for now I want to narrow down to the ADA laws to the companion interpreter part. I just want to know if I can legally have a companion interpreter. any tips anyone has? see notes below:
-----------
The ADA very clearly states the need for proper communication with hard of hearing and deaf individuals. Specifically, the ADA states: ... Therefore, any place of public accommodation is required to provide sign language interpreters or other effective means of communication for hard of hearing individuals.

The rules apply to communicating with the person who is receiving the covered entity’s goods or services as well as with that person’s parent, spouse, or companion in appropriate circumstances.
https://www.ada.gov/effective-comm.htm
-------------
A “qualified” interpreter means someone who is able to interpret effectively, accurately, and impartially, both receptively (i.e., understanding what the person with the disability is saying) and expressively (i.e., having the skill needed to convey information back to that person) using any necessary specialized vocabulary. https://www.ada.gov/effective-comm.htm
--------------------
The term “companion” includes any family member, friend, or associate of a person seeking or receiving an entity’s goods or services who is an appropriate person with whom the entity should communicate. https://www.ada.gov/effective-comm.htm
 

Communication Software for Deaf Hard of Hearing - NexTalk

Top