Spelling words the way they sound (Oral habits)

Discussion in 'Sign Language & Deaf Education' started by naisho, May 16, 2009.

  1. naisho

    naisho Forum Disorders M.D.,Ph.D

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    Thought I'd drop a little something to get the English, language, linguistics, ASL/deaf/HH experts to drop their opinions on this, and hopefully things stirring (not, kidding).


    I had a short discussion with a friend who is deaf about the way hearing, hard of hearing often may tend to spell words the way they are pronounced, or the way they sound.

    I found it really interesting to look into this. Because this prompted me to search on here for some results. As a result of my search, I found that spelling errors were usually done by those who are hearing or hearing impaired, but never or infrequently from those who are deaf (as in can't hear oral communication).

    Case 1
    For one example, the word definitely is spelled definitely, correct? Do you tend to notice that some people spell it as definately?

    Obviously when spoken in pronunciation form, it sounds as if there is an "a" where it is in the incorrect spelling, as definitely is literally pronounced "deaf-a-nate-ley", in my mind. Some others pronounce it as, "deaf-nate-ley"

    Case 2
    The same can be said for "rediculous" instead of ridiculous. I don't know how to explain this one, but this is a less common mistake that usually hits my "observation alert" in the brain telling me this person spelled it the way it sounds.

    Case 3
    "Descrimination" instead of discrimination.

    There are probably more, maybe you can add them here.


    Vice versa, some words are spelled the way they sound and I have seen that some might not spell it correctly likewise. Such as the word spaghetti, sometimes gets written as sphagetti.




    This sometimes indicates to me that the speaker was raised in an oral or speech form, because it would appear to me that a profoundly deaf or severely hard of hearing person would be less likely to make these "pronounciative" spelling mistakes.

    What do you think?
     
  2. Bottesini

    Bottesini Old Deaf Ranter Premium Member

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    I have pointed out repeatedly that hearing can't spell.
     
  3. rockin'robin

    rockin'robin Well-Known Member

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    I believe it!...They (hearies) can speak it, but can't spell it...Met so many people like that.

    And the word "San Juan"...Juan is spoke with a W not a J ...

    Was introduced to someone not too long ago...nice looking guy...he started conversing with me and I asked him to repeat what he said on paper...his face turned "red"....and he walked off....to find out the man could not read or write......
     
  4. Beowulf

    Beowulf Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Hmmmm, good post. I think it boils down to the deaf person's willingness to be corrected in the pronunciation of words. My friends know that I want to be corrected when I mispronounce a word, but not during a board meeting.
     
  5. loml

    loml New Member

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    Bottesini - There are definitely words spellings that do not follow the sounds of the words. My understanding is that 20 % of the words claimed to be English are actually from other languages. I myself when I say the word "definitely" do not say a "short a", (or is he suggesting a "long A" becuase of the letter "e" after the letter "t"), but rather a "short i" sound. Does that help or hinder me with my spelling or am I simply a lowzee tieper?? :dunno: :)

    Really it is simply two different approaches to understanding print.
     
  6. naisho

    naisho Forum Disorders M.D.,Ph.D

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    loml - This is not to criticize or point you out of the list of "suspects" among my search.

    I found in one of your previous posts during my search conducted on here. This indicates to me, or rather, gives me an impression that you were raised from an oral environment by chance, is that true?

     
  7. loml

    loml New Member

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    naisho - LOL I am not surprised, but seriously when I say that word out loud I do not enunciate an "a", short or long. :dunno: Or maybe I just don't enunciate the a when I am thinking about it. :hmm:

    My parents have heavy Scottish accents, maybe this has something to do with it. All very interesting indeed. :)

    One could define my environment as having an oral component I suppose..:wave:
     
  8. Beowulf

    Beowulf Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    How can a deaf person spell a word he/she cannot hear?
     
  9. Mrs Bucket

    Mrs Bucket New Member

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    OH OH OH OH! ME ME ME ME!

    Get this.. when I used Viable to place a call.. my BIL Juan picked up the phone and the operator fingerspelled.... "Ron".

    My pet peeve nowadays are teens spelling "Yeah" with this "Ya".. ugh!
     
  10. deafskeptic

    deafskeptic Active Member Premium Member

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    Well I notice that hearing tend to misspell words by spelling it the way they sound. Deaf on the other hand tend to spell by sight and they may get two similar words mixed up or the spelling may look like the correct spelled word and have a letter or too wrong. I used to spell Mississpi by trowing in as many "i"s and "s"s as possible.
     
  11. deafskeptic

    deafskeptic Active Member Premium Member

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    Uh, I am under the impression Loml is hearing.
     
  12. jillio

    jillio New Member

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    loml is hearing.

    The fact that the deaf are actually better spellers than the hearing is a well known concept. It has to do with the top down processing that is employed in processing the written word. There has been much cognitive psychology research done on this very topic as it relates to the deaf.
     
  13. Beowulf

    Beowulf Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Oh yea. ;) My pet peeve is the pathetic pathetic use of "off of." :roll:
     
  14. jillio

    jillio New Member

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    You are correct. The errors made by hearing spellers are phonetically similar sounds, and those made by deaf spellers are in two words that create the same shape overall. We do not look at the individual letters when we see and process a familiar word. We see the overall shape formed by the letters.I think we had a similar discussion a while back.
     
  15. jillio

    jillio New Member

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    If you take it back far enough, all English words come from other languages. Phonetically spelling has absolutely nothing to do with understanding print. Being able to phonetically sound out a word does absolutely nothing to provide cues regarding the meaning of that word. Meaning is necessary for understanding print.
     
  16. Lissa

    Lissa Active Member Premium Member

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    Iv been a quite good speller throughout my life. I am not exaggerating. As soon I see once how a word is spelt I can spell it correctly continously. But of course the same as many deaf people like me I do have trouble spelling words that I cannot pronouce or really hear properly
     
  17. naisho

    naisho Forum Disorders M.D.,Ph.D

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    Basically, the reason why I'm posting this is because of an overall hypothesis I've been trying to conduct (this is not for empirical purposes, just for self-realization).

    You have to be raised from an oral environment to spell the word "definately" incorrectly, and by oral environment I include hearing, and the hearing impaired.

    Would most of us agree on this?
    Because, I had noticed and am guessing that a Deaf (I say this with a capital D), who was raised from a deaf environment, would be virtually impossible for them to misspell "definately" because for one they can't hear it. There are probably some exemptions, but this is the overall question I am trying to present.

    Any comments or suggestions on that?
     
  18. Beowulf

    Beowulf Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Meaning no offense, but is your spell checker on? Don't worry, I am in the same baot! And btw, naisho specified folk with profound hearing loss, which I assume to mean those who cannot hear voices.
     
  19. Lissa

    Lissa Active Member Premium Member

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    I usually make mistakes when I type fast I dont usually check the spelling. Sorry guys LOL
     
  20. jillio

    jillio New Member

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    No, you do not have to be from an oral environment to spell a word incorrectly, nor is it virtually impossible to spell a word incorrectly simply because you are deaf. The type of spelling errors made are simply different.
    Someone from an oral environment is more likely to make errors based on phonetic similarities, and someone from a visual environment is more likely to make errors based on shape similarities.
     

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