Should I fight for an interpreter?

jillio

New Member
I am guessing she is hearing?

Regardless for extra curricular activities and such and not provide him with a Terp for P.E. of after school functions I don't think it is a bad thing. In fact, I think it is good to expose him to more independent learning with out a Terp. Only reason is because you can't pay for a Terp to follow you around all your life. I think everyone regardless being deaf, blind, etc.. should learn to cope with the everyday problems of being around people. Not sure if I make complete sense or not but, I tried.

I mean does she realize that deafness doesn't prevent her son from doing anything but, hear? I mean I do fine, yeah I wear hearing aids and lost my hearing later in life and learning to read lips has always been an ongoing struggle for myself but, I cope with it. I only have about 40% understand of speech on with my hearing aid.
This is a child. He is being socialized through extra curricular activities. One of the major rasons that deaf students in the mainstream experience problems with social skills development is because they don't have the access they need to develop those skills.
 

jillio

New Member
Oh, jillo to defend CSign I think she started the OP for discussion....she wanted to make sure she wasn't a jackiesolarnizo....remmy her? "Oh I want the most cutting edge accomondations for my kids so that they can get into a Brand Name University!" (for those of you who are new, Jackie was the mom of two kids who were doing AWESOME (by any account) with minimal accomondations...but b/c she wanted the newest thing, and she felt so entitled, she was fighting for CPrint for them....And before I get attacked....If her kids had clearly shown to need something like cprint (ie they were obviously struggling, like making Cs instread of As) I would have been all " go for it.
CSign, it is 100% OK to ask for a 'terp. You're not acting all entitled or anything. Your son has clearly shown that he strongly benifits from the use of a 'terp, and this will provide for 100% understanding.
Also, re the camp. I know that CSDF is a bit far away but on the other hand...I know that parents have trouble sending their kids off to camp....but I also think that if you did send your son to overnight deaf camp he would come back LOVING it, and it would be one of those things where he talks about it all the time etc. Yes, its a long way away....but the benifit is SO worth it.
Mmmmkay.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
He is being socialized through extra curricular activities. One of the major rasons that deaf students in the mainstream experience problems with social skills development is because they don't have the access they need to develop those skills.
OTH, that is true overall for MANY " included" kids with disabilties....and not just "classic" disabilties either. Kids with 'frequnetly seen" issues like ADD or LD very often have major social issues too.
 

DURAY

New Member
Many deaf kids who are mainstreamed often get together on the weekends to socialized.
One of the major reasons that deaf students in the deaf school experience problems with academic skills development is because they don't have the access they need to develop those academic skills. To some deaf kids at MSSD and MSD, doing good in school is to be "hearing".


OTH, that is true overall for MANY " included" kids with disabilties....and not just "classic" disabilties either. Kids with 'frequnetly seen" issues like ADD or LD very often have major social issues too.
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
Many deaf kids who are mainstreamed often get together on the weekends to socialized.
One of the major reasons that deaf students in the deaf school experience problems with academic skills development is because they don't have the access they need to develop those academic skills. To some deaf kids at MSSD and MSD, doing good in school is to be "hearing".
That doesnt make sense at all.
 

lanapoo

New Member
Many deaf kids who are mainstreamed often get together on the weekends to socialized.
One of the major reasons that deaf students in the deaf school experience problems with academic skills development is because they don't have the access they need to develop those academic skills. To some deaf kids at MSSD and MSD, doing good in school is to be "hearing".
Huh? :hmm:
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Many deaf kids who are mainstreamed often get together on the weekends to socialized.
One of the major reasons that deaf students in the deaf school experience problems with academic skills development is because they don't have the access they need to develop those academic skills. To some deaf kids at MSSD and MSD, doing good in school is to be "hearing".
It sounded like you were onto something, but fizzled. Try explaining with different words. If you cannot explain something concisely and clearly, you don't know what you are talking about. This is not a criticism, just an urging to try again. :lol:
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
Many deaf kids who are mainstreamed often get together on the weekends to socialized.
One of the major reasons that deaf students in the deaf school experience problems with academic skills development is because they don't have the access they need to develop those academic skills. To some deaf kids at MSSD and MSD, doing good in school is to be "hearing".

Quite a long time ago I remember reading of some of the academic problems in inner cities coming from a feeling among black kids that good grades were "white" and that they did not want to be accused of acting "white". I think that Duray is trying to say the same thing about "deaf" and "hearing" with the deaf kids not wanting to be regarded as trying to act hearing.
 

inmate23

Active Member
Quite a long time ago I remember reading of some of the academic problems in inner cities coming from a feeling among black kids that good grades were "white" and that they did not want to be accused of acting "white". I think that Duray is trying to say the same thing about "deaf" and "hearing" with the deaf kids not wanting to be regarded as trying to act hearing.
Yea that was my take too. I get accused of being "hearing" cos I can read by my DEAF mates because I get good grades in legal studies what they dont get is that its ALL WRITTEN and im learning signed grammer.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
One of the major reasons that deaf students in the deaf school experience problems with academic skills development is because they don't have the access they need to develop those academic skills. To some deaf kids at MSSD and MSD, doing good in school is to be "hearing".
And from where did you develop that theroy? I think you're speaking from the perspective of an old deafie. Nowadays most deaf kids in deaf school are behind b/c they fell through the cracks majorly in the mainstream. Haven't you seen bajagirl and shel90 post on how they have to fix the messes the mainstream sends them? Most students at deaf schools were mainstreamed....and I mean quite a few of the students who survived mainstreaming are burnt out from being mainstreamed...you have no idea.
 

jillio

New Member
Quite a long time ago I remember reading of some of the academic problems in inner cities coming from a feeling among black kids that good grades were "white" and that they did not want to be accused of acting "white". I think that Duray is trying to say the same thing about "deaf" and "hearing" with the deaf kids not wanting to be regarded as trying to act hearing.
More likely, they come from the educational system being responsible for perpetrating a self fulfilling prophecy. There have been numerous research studies done on the topic.
 
Of course you'd fight for your son's right. Doing what is right is not always popular. I hope your son is learning from you how to stand up for his rights for himself in the future.
 
Deaf schools can be hours away, expensive and just not an option for some families. What a small minded and spiteful comment. A mother asks for help and you give a flippant remark like that; shame. I hope you are met with the same warmth when you ask for help.
 
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