Poor Hearing May Cause Poor Memory

Nancy

New Member
Date: 2005-09-01
URL: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/09/050901071906.htm

Brandeis Study: Poor Hearing May Cause Poor Memory

Brandeis researchers say older people suffering a hearing loss might also lose the ability to remember spoken language.

The researchers said older adults with mild to moderate hearing loss might expend so much cognitive energy on hearing accurately, their ability to remember spoken language suffers as a result.

The study showed even when older adults could hear words well enough to repeat them, their ability to memorize and remember the words was poorer when compared with other individuals of the same age who had good hearing.

"There are subtle effects of hearing loss on memory and cognitive function in older adults," said Arthur Wingfield, the Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Neuroscience and director of the Volen National Center for Complex Systems. "This study is a wake-up call to anyone who works with older people, including healthcare professionals, to be especially sensitive to how hearing loss can affect cognitive function."

He suggested individuals who interact with older people with some hearing loss could modify how they speak by speaking clearly and pausing after clauses, or chunks of meaning, not necessarily slowing down speech dramatically. The research appears in the journal Current Directions in Psychological Science.
 
M

Mookie

Guest
That includes CI? If CI dimishes, the brain cells are getting perishable....
 

mer074

New Member
That happens to me and I'm in my late 20s! I have to concentrate really hard to tell what people are saying and then I forget it. It's not that I'm not paying attention so I agree with what this article says except for the part about it only being older people this happens to.
 

dkf747

Active Member
I disagree with the idea that this also applies to younger deaf or hard-of-hearing.. It sure isn't true of any that I know. The study, apparently, didn't include younger persons. The title of the thread does not reflect that though.
 

Nancy

New Member
mer074 said:
That happens to me and I'm in my late 20s! I have to concentrate really hard to tell what people are saying and then I forget it. It's not that I'm not paying attention so I agree with what this article says except for the part about it only being older people this happens to.
You aren't the only one...and I am in my 30s. I know I was paying attention, but it's like I forget some things later on...I don't know why. The thing is...this article was talking about the elderly with hearing loss.
 

sr171soars

New Member
mld4ds said:
That includes CI? If CI dimishes, the brain cells are getting perishable....
If you would read the original article, maybe you wouldn't say asinine statements like this. From reading other statements you have made in the past, you really have a thing against CIs. It is your opinion I will leave it at that.

The article was referring to speech memory not memory in general. The gist of it was that older people with hearing losses of one sort or another have a much harder time remembering speech patterns and spoken words. Nowhere does it state that a person's memory be possibly unreliable because of a hearing loss. If that were the case, every person in this forum who has a hearing loss is in deep trouble - you included (assuming you have a hearing loss).

Getting older and general memory issues are a whole another issue and nobody in this world is exempt from those at some point in life. Live long enough and you will have problems remember things!!! Even this has no bearing whether you can hear or not.

BTW - One of the last of the sensory organs to leave you before you die is hearing. So, somebody with a CI should be good till about that point...which makes your observation even more silly.
 
M

Mookie

Guest
sr171soars said:
If you would read the original article, maybe you wouldn't say asinine statements like this. From reading other statements you have made in the past, you really have a thing against CIs. It is your opinion I will leave it at that.

The article was referring to speech memory not memory in general. The gist of it was that older people with hearing losses of one sort or another have a much harder time remembering speech patterns and spoken words. Nowhere does it state that a person's memory be possibly unreliable because of a hearing loss. If that were the case, every person in this forum who has a hearing loss is in deep trouble - you included (assuming you have a hearing loss).

Getting older and general memory issues are a whole another issue and nobody in this world is exempt from those at some point in life. Live long enough and you will have problems remember things!!! Even this has no bearing whether you can hear or not.
QUOTE]

Prove me if senior citizens with CIs already lost their minds and could not identify any environment sound. I am sure that any CI organization or SHHH would not admit....
 

sr171soars

New Member
mld4ds said:
Prove me if senior citizens with CIs already lost their minds and could not identify any environment sound. I am sure that any CI organization or SHHH would not admit....
Now you are talking about a totally another subject. Impairment of brain function due to Alzheimer's, general senility, health related impairment (i.e., stroke) and etc., could cause anybody to not recognize sounds whether speech or environmental. One has to have a functioning "mind" to be cognizant of any sensory input. It doesn't matter how you hear...whether with normal, aided with HAs, aided with CIs, or just deaf.

Again the article simply discussed older adults with hearing losses (not with mental deficiencies) and the relationship with speech memory.

As for your assertions about any CI or SHHH organizations not admitting this (about CIs not being useful when in a impaired mental state) is patently absurd. Of course that would true! If one had glasses or contacts and one is mentally impaired, your argument would be that they couldn't recognize what they see! Er...what is your point? :dunno: That is common sense. Having a CI is absolutely irrelevant in respect to the article. What is relevant is whether one has a hearing loss.

I get the feeling you like to stir up the pot and you couldn't really care less if you have a valid point or not. *Sigh* Very sad indeed.
 
M

Mookie

Guest
sr171soars said:
Now you are talking about a totally another subject. Impairment of brain function due to Alzheimer's, general senility, health related impairment (i.e., stroke) and etc., could cause anybody to not recognize sounds whether speech or environmental. One has to have a functioning "mind" to be cognizant of any sensory input. It doesn't matter how you hear...whether with normal, aided with HAs, aided with CIs, or just deaf.

Again the article simply discussed older adults with hearing losses (not with mental deficiencies) and the relationship with speech memory.

As for your assertions about any CI or SHHH organizations not admitting this (about CIs not being useful when in a impaired mental state) is patently absurd. Of course that would true! If one had glasses or contacts and one is mentally impaired, your argument would be that they couldn't recognize what they see! Er...what is your point? :dunno: That is common sense. Having a CI is absolutely irrelevant in respect to the article. What is relevant is whether one has a hearing loss.

I get the feeling you like to stir up the pot and you couldn't really care less if you have a valid point or not. *Sigh* Very sad indeed.
I see...you are rowing the wrong path...
 

dkf747

Active Member
sr171soars said:
The article was referring to speech memory not memory in general. The gist of it was that older people with hearing losses of one sort or another have a much harder time remembering speech patterns and spoken words. Nowhere does it state that a person's memory be possibly unreliable because of a hearing loss.
That is not what the title says. The misleading title causes some to misunderstand the article. It also calls into question whether we can trust the article or not.
 

sr171soars

New Member
Er...good point and I can see how that would be a problem but that doesn't invalidate the article "per se".

I tend to not take titles at face value and see what was actually written. Journalism tends to use titles in disingenious ways...mostly to catch one's attention. I have seen that far too often for my liking especially once I start reading it and then realize the title is too loosely associated with the subject. *Shrugs*...what can you do?
 

AJ

New Member
Nancy said:
I thought you are deaf or hard-of-hearing. :) I didn't know you are hearing. :)

yup im hearing. my aunt teaches ASL in high school. she taught me how to sign a long time ago.
 

Steven

New Member
Whee! I have an excuse now! :D

Seriously, as I lose my hearing, I am finding myself misspelling words that I never used to misspell, using "s" in the place of soft "c" for example. I wonder if that is related?
 

catalyse

New Member
i hear perfectly and i cant remember what i had for breakfast.

ROFL XDDDD
I can't remember my own name ;o My audiologist when he first met me he was saying "What's your age?" and i'm like "Uummmmm..OH! I KNOW THIS ONE! I KNOW IT!" xDD
 

Anita Blake

New Member
I wear 2 hearing aids, one in each ear. I'm also bilingual so there are times when I get confused. I'll be talking with someone in english and next thing you know I start talking in spanish. Or there are times when I completely forget what I was about to say. Mostly I end up searching for words to explain what goes through my head.
It can get very irritating.
Does anyone else go through this?
I'm 20 yrs old so it's not like I'm old.
:Owned: :smash: :fu2: :deaf:
 

Old Analog

Member
What causes tinnitus correlates with early memory loss, I think? Can't remember, does that ring a bell with any one, I can't tell I've got tinnitus .
 
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