Please explain why deaf people are proud to be deaf???

Ericka

Active Member
How did you all find or cultivate your D/deaf identity or Hard of hearing identity and being or becoming apart of the Deaf world and Culture. What were your obstacles or challenges? What made it hard becoming a member of the community and what advice would you give to someone who wasn't born Deaf/ Hoh who is struggling to find themselves in the communty.
 

sonocativo

Well-Known Member
fine tuned it since birth ( no efforts on my behalf) struggled through mainstream schooling. Cultural Deaf don't accept non cultural deaf and stay away from them....especially their Deaf Socials...lol
 

Ericka

Active Member
I know I have encountered at the few DCC I have attended some wonderful Deaf people through only "shunning " I experienced is when I said for the first time (ever) "I'm hard of hearing and explained why" the lovely deaf older gentleman I always Chat with says (signs) "no you just have a hearing aid" that kind of tanked my thoughts on myself and how best to identify myself.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
I know I have encountered at the few DCC I have attended some wonderful Deaf people through only "shunning " I experienced is when I said for the first time (ever) "I'm hard of hearing and explained why" the lovely deaf older gentleman I always Chat with says (signs) "no you just have a hearing aid" that kind of tanked my thoughts on myself and how best to identify myself.
There are different degrees of deafness. I have progressive hearing loss and though my HAs allowed me to hear well for many years, I was still deaf. I now have a CI in one ear but am still deaf.
I usually refer to myself as deaf/HoH because non-deaf people don't understand that being deaf does not mean total lack of sound.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
How did you all find or cultivate your D/deaf identity or Hard of hearing identity and being or becoming apart of the Deaf world and Culture. What were your obstacles or challenges? What made it hard becoming a member of the community and what advice would you give to someone who wasn't born Deaf/ Hoh who is struggling to find themselves in the communty.
I didn't really find my identity til I went to college as I grew up oral, mainstreamed completely with pretty much nil exposure to other deaf kids/adults. I lived in an area where back then there likely wasn't that many but did know there was in Philadelphia. Obstacles/challenges.... learning a new language...I also had the added addition of my vision problems.
I don't think I ever really experienced 'shunning'- at least not outright shunning. There was probably some subtle shunning but am used to that as that happened all through school to some degree. Today I don't feel there is much. Sure there are still some who can be complete assholes but you'll find that in any kind of community.

As for advice... just be yourself, try the best you can and just enjoy yourself.

fine tuned it since birth ( no efforts on my behalf) struggled through mainstream schooling. Cultural Deaf don't accept non cultural deaf and stay away from them....especially their Deaf Socials...lol
I have never seen or experienced that even though it's kind of obvious that I am a "oral" deaf (born deaf). But that's purely a personal experience with cultural Deaf not accepting "non-cultural deaf". :).

I don't think that's really true. I am definitely Deaf, but I don't shun others who are not.
Ditto- and have not seen that to be true in most instances.

Location. location, location just like they say about real estate.
Errm? What does location have to do with "Cultural Deaf accepting or not accepting those who aren't"? I can see where "location" matters when one wants to get involved with Deaf social events- whether it be ASL or Oral/verbal only but it's more attitude than location that influences how people are accepted or not.
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
Errm? What does location have to do with "Cultural Deaf accepting or not accepting those who aren't"? I can see where "location" matters when one wants to get involved with Deaf social events- whether it be ASL or Oral/verbal only but it's more attitude than location that influences how people are accepted or not.
I didn't think my comment was going to be hard to understand. I seems natural to me that how anything is treated by a group of people will vary with location. In this case with Cultural Deaf being more accepting in some areas than others.
 

sonocativo

Well-Known Member
I don't think that's really true. I am definitely Deaf, but I don't shun others who are not.
I don't think all are like that ( I would hope not) but the 3 I went to certainly were, they were rude and very standoffish, sadly. So, I haven't been to any more except one that a Deaf co-worker of my wife invited us to ( forgot name of it but is well known ) we had a good time but there were still those who were ignorant and especially a senior member there who was very aggressive and questioning us every chance ( asking who we knew, how we knew them...ect... ) it wasn't a private social it was very public and online.. Botti was the one who mentioned it to me in the past but I never went and when we were invited by my wifes Deaf friend from work I was surprised to find out it was there. But like Ive mentioned before not all Culturally Deaf people are friendly, why? Its beyond me, even if it isn't their home, party...ect...

This was the place https://www.gslad.org/
 
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sonocativo

Well-Known Member
I didn't really find my identity til I went to college as I grew up oral, mainstreamed completely with pretty much nil exposure to other deaf kids/adults. I lived in an area where back then there likely wasn't that many but did know there was in Philadelphia. Obstacles/challenges.... learning a new language...I also had the added addition of my vision problems.
I don't think I ever really experienced 'shunning'- at least not outright shunning. There was probably some subtle shunning but am used to that as that happened all through school to some degree. Today I don't feel there is much. Sure there are still some who can be complete assholes but you'll find that in any kind of community.

As for advice... just be yourself, try the best you can and just enjoy yourself.



I have never seen or experienced that even though it's kind of obvious that I am a "oral" deaf (born deaf). But that's purely a personal experience with cultural Deaf not accepting "non-cultural deaf". :).


Ditto- and have not seen that to be true in most instances.



Errm? What does location have to do with "Cultural Deaf accepting or not accepting those who aren't"? I can see where "location" matters when one wants to get involved with Deaf social events- whether it be ASL or Oral/verbal only but it's more attitude than location that influences how people are accepted or not.
well if youre ever in town hit me up, Ill take you there and you can see how they are yourself. While we were there with the member that invited us they were nice, when that member was abstent they were total a**holes. We took a dish and all but we ended up leaving after 30 minutes because of the hostile environment. When the lady who invited us asked why we weren't coming anymore, we explained what happened when she wasn't there, she was really confused. I ran into her recently and she said she left there as well ( her children are deaf ) said they were getting really ignorant towards members there ( and this was held at a church...lol ) ah well, I didn't lose any sleep over it.
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
I think she meant deaf community and non deaf communities
What I was getting at is how people are treated where sonocativo had contacts seems to vary greatly from what AllleyCat experienced in a different location. Thus the comment of location, location, location. People in different geographical locations having different attitudes being common. Let's see is there a different way I can say this that gets at what I was trying to say?
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
What I was getting at is how people are treated where sonocativo had contacts seems to vary greatly from what AllleyCat experienced in a different location. Thus the comment of location, location, location. People in different geographical locations having different attitudes being common. Let's see is there a different way I can say this that gets at what I was trying to say?
Not just location but also demographics. In my area, overall, the Deaf community is very diverse and welcoming. There is some distinction between age groups. The older group is more socially traditional in their social activities, and not as diverse but still welcoming. Their group is getting smaller, sadly because they're dying off. The younger group is more socially active, trying new activities and locations. Some activities are family friendly, some more tuned to young adult interest, some for the ladies only, some church centered. They keep in touch and plan things thru Facebook. You better have energy to keep up with that group. :lol:
 
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