Parents, don't leave your babies near dogs!

OldNavyGirl

Active Member
Premium Member
Babies shouldn't be unsupervised with a dog no matter the size.

Any dog can be a danger to a baby. Babies do unexpected things, and things that dogs regard as uncivilized all the time.

Not the dogs fault. It is just instinct and it's very irresponsible to leave a baby alone with a dog.
I agreed! my daughter did got dog bitten at her daddy's house once.... I'm so shocked when that happened.... I'm very relieved she's ok...
 

GrayEagle

New Member
I grew up with no dogs because my mother was afraid of them. I had to wait until I was out of college and on my own. Then I got my first dog! Happy me! ;) And I have had dogs pretty much ever since, LOL! :P When my DH (husband) & I married we each had a dog. Neither of us was going to give our dog up. His was 125 lab/shepherd mix and mine a Norwegian Elkhound, 60 lbs. The dogs formed a peaceful pack with us and all was peaceful in our little house. 5 years later we had our daughter. We never for a moment feared for her safety. Even in her crawling and toddling stages, the dogs accepted her and protected her just like they did us. But we made sure they did not suffer from lack of attention or exercise from us, after our daughter (DD) came into our lives. We supervised encounters closely, as training sessions for them and for her, as to acceptable behaviors. Made sure the dogs were not ignored or their lives were in too much upheaval, but that DD was part of our family "pack." They accepted that without a qualm. Because we met their psychological & emotional needs as well as our DD's. It took a lot of thought, effort and planning. Of course, we supervised them all, especially DD as she was apt to get into things she shouldn't, being a typical curious kid (like books to tear apart, or scribble in, LOL! or into stuff under the sink - used cabinet locks for that), so we watched her carefully. But we knew our dogs and we trained our daughter to be respectful of them, not pull ears or tail or do other kind of behaviors. She was taught they were not entertainment or toys. It all worked out fine. Now, if someone had threatened her, they would have been all over the transgressor, but never her. You have to know your dogs well, have established you are their pack leader, and so on. Now the dog we have now had a rough first year of her life, being dumped into the confusion and overwhelming experience of shelters, being deaf. She has a strong fear & startle response. We would never have adopted her if we had young children around because she couldn't handle the sudden moves, etc. But we don't and we live a quiet life, and it is good for her, as a rescue dog with special needs. And she is good for us, too. :aw: So, you have to know your dogs. Nothing is 100% "safe" no matter what it is. Total unreasoning fear isn't good, either. I think children should be taught to treat animals respectfully just as they want to be treated, as well as responsible care for them when the child is old enough to participate in the care of family pets. Pets are not playthings but living beings. JMO. :hmm:
 

Oceanbreeze

New Member
I don't know if I want to actually read these articles, Reba. I will only say this... I agree with you that we need to put our children's welfare before ANY animals.
 

Rosewind

Member
Yea. Agree with you what said.
This morning, I was reading newspapers about family dog killed a year old boy in accident in Henderson, Nevada. It is very sad.

I believe that boy's parent are really responsible for watch over them both. They should NOT leave them alone like this. well..
 

Kalima01

New Member
I was brought up with a German Shepherd.
There are photos all over the place of me laying curled up using Sheba's stomach as a pillow... I even did the same to my Grandpa's Springer Spaniel.

My parents gave the Shepherd away to the police force as she had a habit of eating her own faeces then coming in to lick my face and my parents were disgusted (should've trained her not to do it lol).

When my brother was born, we got a mutt - he always stayed away from my brother cos he would pull his tail etc.

Later, moving to Australia from UK, we settled and got ourselves a little Cocker Spaniel x Retriever... She was adorable. My Dad tormented her more than any child so she grew up not caring if toddlers pulled her ears or tail. If she didn't like it, she moved away and stay out of reach.

I myself now have a Great Dane.
I made sure he was exposed from day one to my niece (1yr old at the time) and I pull his ears I put my fingers in and around his mouth, I pull his tail, I bang on his bum, I tap him on the head - basically anything a child will do, I do.
He is awesome around kids - except he hates a big group of them - I don't blame him, neither do I.

At the end of the day it's a parent's responsibility to supervise their children at all times.
You do not leave your child unsupervised near a road, a car, in the bathroom (with a full bath), a pool, at the beach/lake/river so therefore you do not leave your child unsupervised near a dog.

It is not the dog's fault. It is the parents.

There are plenty of exercises you can do if you have a dog but are expecting, to ease the dog into a change.

Common sense, the dog is no better babysitter then the bloody TV.

I don't agree with these comments about putting the welfare of a child above the animal... As a parent, you chose to have the dog AND the kid... If you can't do the necessary training, preparations etc then pick one or the other...
So many people "abandon" their dogs once a kid comes along - never mind that dog was their "child" for a good few yrs or whatever... The dog or child didn't chose the situation - the parent did.

My parents managed fine juggling both, my friends have managed fine.
 

Kalima01

New Member
I grew up with no dogs because my mother was afraid of them. I had to wait until I was out of college and on my own. Then I got my first dog! Happy me! ;) And I have had dogs pretty much ever since, LOL! :P When my DH (husband) & I married we each had a dog. Neither of us was going to give our dog up. His was 125 lab/shepherd mix and mine a Norwegian Elkhound, 60 lbs. The dogs formed a peaceful pack with us and all was peaceful in our little house. 5 years later we had our daughter. We never for a moment feared for her safety. Even in her crawling and toddling stages, the dogs accepted her and protected her just like they did us. But we made sure they did not suffer from lack of attention or exercise from us, after our daughter (DD) came into our lives. We supervised encounters closely, as training sessions for them and for her, as to acceptable behaviors. Made sure the dogs were not ignored or their lives were in too much upheaval, but that DD was part of our family "pack." They accepted that without a qualm. Because we met their psychological & emotional needs as well as our DD's. It took a lot of thought, effort and planning. Of course, we supervised them all, especially DD as she was apt to get into things she shouldn't, being a typical curious kid (like books to tear apart, or scribble in, LOL! or into stuff under the sink - used cabinet locks for that), so we watched her carefully. But we knew our dogs and we trained our daughter to be respectful of them, not pull ears or tail or do other kind of behaviors. She was taught they were not entertainment or toys. It all worked out fine. Now, if someone had threatened her, they would have been all over the transgressor, but never her. You have to know your dogs well, have established you are their pack leader, and so on. Now the dog we have now had a rough first year of her life, being dumped into the confusion and overwhelming experience of shelters, being deaf. She has a strong fear & startle response. We would never have adopted her if we had young children around because she couldn't handle the sudden moves, etc. But we don't and we live a quiet life, and it is good for her, as a rescue dog with special needs. And she is good for us, too. :aw: So, you have to know your dogs. Nothing is 100% "safe" no matter what it is. Total unreasoning fear isn't good, either. I think children should be taught to treat animals respectfully just as they want to be treated, as well as responsible care for them when the child is old enough to participate in the care of family pets. Pets are not playthings but living beings. JMO. :hmm:
You're awesome!
This is exactly what people need to be like when having pets and children!

Thanks for your story :)
 

whatdidyousay!

Well-Known Member
People should also be careful with leaving a baby alone with cats. My sister cat just had kittens and I was watching my sister's baby while she sleeping on a bed. I just happen to look over my shoulder and saw the cat flying through the air to attack my niece! The mother cat must had thought the baby was an animal and a threat to her kittens! If I had not been there my niece would had blinded as the cat was aiming for her face with her claws outs! Babies should not be left alone with any pets.
 

caz12

New Member
my mothers small yorki bit her little finger off he was destroyed same day,but she treated it like human child and it was a dog..i cringe when i think of her leaving her grandchildren in same room as the dog but then my mother is cruel woman
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Update:

Report: Another child of McGrews attacked by family dog

In the past year, Quintin and Chantel McGrew have lost an infant to a dog mauling, have seen their surviving children twice removed from their home, endured an investigation into their sex habits and have been accused of stealing jewelry.

Now, reports have surfaced that one of their two remaining children has suffered a “significant” injury in an attack by another dog at the family’s home.

The state Department of Social Services notified the Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office on Jan. 3 of the alleged attack. DSS reported that the dog bite left a puncture wound on the child’s right cheek and the left side of his nose, but officials did not specify when the injury occurred, according to the incident report.

Sheriff’s spokesman Dan Moon confirmed that his agency is investigating the report, but he said he had no further information to release.

Reached by phone Tuesday afternoon, the child’s mother, Chantel McGrew, refused to discuss the incident.

“I am sick and tired of my life being all over the newspaper and the TV,” she said. “I’m done. I’m trying to put all this behind me.”

McGrew questioned why the media kept prying into her life. When a reporter explained that this was the second dog attack reported in their home in less than a year in which a child was injured, she replied, “At least my kid lived after this dog attack.”


The McGrews came under the scrutiny of DSS last year after losing their infant son to an April mauling by another family dog, which has since been euthanized.

In the April 20 incident, the family’s Labrador retriever mix snatched their baby, Aiden, from a bouncy swing and mauled him. His father, Quintin McGrew, was home at the time but sleeping when the attack occurred. Investigators charged him with unlawful conduct toward a child. He is free on bail while awaiting trial.

Attorney Andy Savage, who is representing Quintin McGrew in that case, could not be reached for comment Tuesday.

The McGrews were living in Dorchester County at the time of the mauling, and DSS removed their surviving children — a 7-year-old girl and a 2-year-old boy — from the home after the attack.

They got their kids back in June, but lost them for a second time in August after their daughter told counselors that she saw homemade porn films of her parents and watched them engage in a sexual threesome with a woman.

The children again were reunited with their parents in September after DSS investigators determined that the allegations against them were unfounded.
That same month, the McGrews pleaded guilty to stealing a relative’s wedding ring, according to court officials. A judge ordered Quintin McGrew, 29, and Chantel McGrew, 24, to pay a $750 fine each.

The McGrews have since moved to Jennifer Drive in Ladson, and that is where the latest dog attack is said to have taken place. The Sheriff’s Office redacted the injured child’s name from the incident report, but the victim is referred to as a boy, and the McGrews have only one son.

Chantel McGrew said a television crew confronted her Tuesday after she returned from picking up her children from a school bus stop. So it appears the children remain with their parents at this time.
Report: Another child of McGrews attacked by family dog – The Post and Courier
 

caz12

New Member
i read about babies and children getting savaged by a dog all to often,when parents ever going to learn
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
I wonder what type of dog. It amazes me that they didn't try to blame a pit bull for it.

If there was any indication that my dog, if I had a dog, was being aggressive to my kid, that dog would be gone.

To be fair, you are supposed to prep the dog for a new family member, bring in soil'd diapers, etc. But, to also be clear, you are not going to get a second chance on this.

Which brings up another point, since I've never had a dog, how would a deaf person know if a dog was growling toward a kid?
 

NitroHonda

New Member
how would a deaf person know if a dog was growling toward a kid?
One of my employees has several dogs. He moved into a new home right before Thanksgiving. He walked outside to see his next door neighbor playing with his dogs. He waved and paused to watch for a fair amount of time. It was not until the neighbor started bleeding profusely before he realized that his dogs were actually attacking the neighbor. Three of them have since been put down and two were returned to him.

Essentially, a Deaf person watched the whole thing and did not know all of his dogs were attacking his neighbor. He was more shook up by the fact that he watched it happen than his dogs getting euthanized... and I promise you... he loved those dogs.
 

KarissaMann05

Active Member
Premium Member
It's shame to see something like that happens. :( Poor those kids.

I would prefer small dogs if kids want a dog, but I wouldn't let them have pets until they're old enough.
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
It's shame to see something like that happens. :( Poor those kids.

I would prefer small dogs if kids want a dog, but I wouldn't let them have pets until they're old enough.
It depends on the dog. I actually got bit pretty good by a poodle when I was a kid. In my view, a mandatory good citizen ship class for dogs is a good investment. It won't stop all bites, but at least you have a foundation.
 

whatdidyousay!

Well-Known Member
Babies and small children should not be let alone with any pet. My sister's baby could had been attack by her cat if I was not been watching the baby.
The cat just had kitten and saw the baby on the bed and was going to made a flying leap onto my niece and I stopped the cat ! My niece's face would had been clawed up if the cat landed on her.
 

Lau2046

Well-Known Member
I wonder what type of dog. It amazes me that they didn't try to blame a pit bull for it.

If there was any indication that my dog, if I had a dog, was being aggressive to my kid, that dog would be gone.

To be fair, you are supposed to prep the dog for a new family member, bring in soil'd diapers, etc. But, to also be clear, you are not going to get a second chance on this.

Which brings up another point, since I've never had a dog, how would a deaf person know if a dog was growling toward a kid?
+1...I was just thinking....hmmm with all the Pit Bulls running around, why didn't they blame the dog for this too? Just goes to show, it's not the breed folks, it's the owner. And it's not just dogs, but cats or any other pet, should never be left alone with a child. Animals should be introduced to the child slowly and with supervision. Sounds like these parents are just train wrecks...and they can't pin that on anyone but themselves....

Laura
 
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