New gene-delivery therapy restores partial hearing, balance in deaf mice

#3
"It" is always "years away," and "more research" is always needed, and... none of it ever comes to pass. The studies are forgotten, and it's business as usual.

There's also a (largely) effective way to treat MS that's been the subject of more than one experiment, but I doubt this treatment will ever see the light of day.
 
#4
"It" is always "years away," and "more research" is always needed, and... none of it ever comes to pass. The studies are forgotten, and it's business as usual.

There's also a (largely) effective way to treat MS that's been the subject of more than one experiment, but I doubt this treatment will ever see the light of day.

I used to work in a lab that focussed on regenerating hair cells to improve hearing. The reason these things are all "far off in the future" is because it would be extraordinarily dangerous to use experimental approach is on humans before establishing their safety and efficacy. This is part of the ethics of science and medicine and one of the most sacrosanct parts of medical research. Dismissing research is "never coming to pass" it is unfair to researchers and patients. In the 1950s childhood leukaemia had a survival links of a month at most, decades of research has improved the survival rate to over 90% at five years for most children.
 
#5
I used to work in a lab that focussed on regenerating hair cells to improve hearing. The reason these things are all "far off in the future" is because it would be extraordinarily dangerous to use experimental approach is on humans before establishing their safety and efficacy. This is part of the ethics of science and medicine and one of the most sacrosanct parts of medical research. Dismissing research is "never coming to pass" it is unfair to researchers and patients. In the 1950s childhood leukaemia had a survival links of a month at most, decades of research has improved the survival rate to over 90% at five years for most children.

My point was not that they shouldn't make sure that new treatments are safe, it's that they never seem to get around to doing ANYTHING.
 

seb

Well-Known Member
#6
In the last six years I've seen at least four articles on gene therapy restoring partial hearing in mice and human trials have always been "several years away." I guess somewhere down the road we will eventually get to the stage of actually having a human trial.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
#8
Totally off-topic here, but speaking of "research years away", I watched the Oscars last night and Michael J. Fox was on. My roommate said Michael's voice is really starting to go due to his Parkinson's. There's always going to be years of research on things, so who knows about the Deaf gene therapy.
 
#12
I am interested in talking with someone about gene therapy. My family has a history of deafness and my identical twin sister also has a severe to profound hearing loss. My loss is at the point where I have almost no hearing remaining so I'm extremely interested in learning more about the trials. I think it is the CRISPR gene therapy, not sure though. If someone can point me in the right direction, I'd appreciate it. Thanks.