Need to solve debate with ASL teacher Help Please

souggy

New Member
The apology wasn't intended for you. You are misinterpreting again.
The apology should go to him. Really. Not me.

I know you two got a lover's spat going on ever since you have come back, but that's none of my business; however, I am leery when people start deflecting.
 

LinuxGold

Active Member
Me tired see argue over over over, enough. Stop strict every word LOOK LOOK THAT THAT word misunderstand, STOP! Jillo I know your character, your way tend make sure word must right format sentence must follow, I tire see you same again again again other thread not only here, please stop.

MOVE ON, FORGET detail IGNORE be flexible, sweet smooth chat ASL way, MOVE ON!
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
I guess I should give the back ground info on the original sentence I asked about. You guys are fun btw!

The conversation was between friends.

Money not-yet arrive. "Do I?

Finish you-page-her?

I-page-her before monday. She-told-me I will get today. Should I-T-T-Y-her again, Huh?

Better not. Maybe go-ahead get lawyer.

Should I I-tell-her I get lawyer O-R...?

Better say nothing. You-ask-her lawyer.
Is your instructor asking you to sign the conversation exactly as it's glossed in the book? If the exercise was truly for interpretation, the book would give you the English conversation, and then you would have to decide which signs and grammar to use, and in which sign order. The gloss version looks like a vocabulary list.

What text book are you using?
 

Carriez4k

New Member
I didn't know when my teacher asked me to sign it that it was in our text book. He just gave me a paper with the English conversation and asked me to sign it. He wanted me to sign it "better" "not" "you" "should" "get" "lawyer". Instead I started by signing "better" and shook my head no thinking that this would mean "no, better not". I've gathered that this really didn't make sense, but at the time I thought I was correct in signing "better not" in this way.

When I discovered that the conversation was in the text book which is Tom Humphries and Carol Padden LEARNING AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I realized where he had gotten it. The book put it into ASL "Better not. Maybe go-ahead get lawyer.

The book isn't asking the student to gloss, just follow what is on the page.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
I didn't know when my teacher asked me to sign it that it was in our text book. He just gave me a paper with the English conversation and asked me to sign it. He wanted me to sign it "better" "not" "you" "should" "get" "lawyer". Instead I started by signing "better" and shook my head no thinking that this would mean "no, better not". I've gathered that this really didn't make sense, but at the time I thought I was correct in signing "better not" in this way.

When I discovered that the conversation was in the text book which is Tom Humphries and Carol Padden LEARNING AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I realized where he had gotten it. The book put it into ASL "Better not. Maybe go-ahead get lawyer.

The book isn't asking the student to gloss, just follow what is on the page.
"Money not-yet arrive. 'Do I'?" is the gloss version, not English.

It's showing you how to sign a sentence, sign by sign, so I would assume that's exactly how your instructor wants it signed, for the classroom exercise.

That's not to say you would have to sign that way in "real" life. There is more than one correct way to sign that concept without following the exact signs used in the text example.

It will always be a truism that you sign one way in class, and another way in the real world. That's true regardless of the languages used. You get the basic foundation in class, then "tweak" it thru cultural exposure.

One other problem with a printed conversation is that we don't really know the emotion or emphasis that is behind the topic. We can only guess at that. In ASL, degree and emphasis require different signs or at least different forms of a sign. One good example is, "I threw up last night." There's a big difference between spitting up once to get rid of a little excess phlegm, and puking up one's guts all night long from food poisoning. Same basic "text book" signs used: LAST-NIGHT, THREW-UP". But very different ways of signing them. :lol:
 

posts from hell

New Member
"Money not-yet arrive. 'Do I'?" is the gloss version, not English.

It's showing you how to sign a sentence, sign by sign, so I would assume that's exactly how your instructor wants it signed, for the classroom exercise.

That's not to say you would have to sign that way in "real" life. There is more than one correct way to sign that concept without following the exact signs used in the text example.

It will always be a truism that you sign one way in class, and another way in the real world. That's true regardless of the languages used. You get the basic foundation in class, then "tweak" it thru cultural exposure.

One other problem with a printed conversation is that we don't really know the emotion or emphasis that is behind the topic. We can only guess at that. In ASL, degree and emphasis require different signs or at least different forms of a sign. One good example is, "I threw up last night." There's a big difference between spitting up once to get rid of a little excess phlegm, and puking up one's guts all night long from food poisoning. Same basic "text book" signs used: LAST-NIGHT, THREW-UP". But very different ways of signing them. :lol:
Thanks for the visual...
 

Carriez4k

New Member
Not that it matters, but just to clarify anyway, I posted both the asl gloss and the english sentences. I understand the difference, I just had a question about signing "better not" that's it. My question was really answered by "posts from hell" on the first page and I was more than happy with his translation. Wow I think this site may cause irritability! Lol. Forgive?
 

posts from hell

New Member
Not that it matters, but just to clarify anyway, I posted both the asl gloss and the english sentences. I understand the difference, I just had a question about signing "better not" that's it. My question was really answered by "posts from hell" on the first page and I was more than happy with his translation. Wow I think this site may cause irritability! Lol. Forgive?
It's all great. You did nothing wrong ;)

Some of us are at each other's throats all the times. It's the life here. :cool2:

Keep coming back with more questions and whatnot, You'll be learning a lot here.

;)
 

Lighthouse77

New Member
Not that it matters, but just to clarify anyway, I posted both the asl gloss and the english sentences. I understand the difference, I just had a question about signing "better not" that's it. My question was really answered by "posts from hell" on the first page and I was more than happy with his translation. Wow I think this site may cause irritability! Lol. Forgive?
what PFH wrote :) You'll get used to it... unless you are very passionate about a topic.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Not that it matters, but just to clarify anyway, I posted both the asl gloss and the english sentences. I understand the difference, I just had a question about signing "better not" that's it. My question was really answered by "posts from hell" on the first page and I was more than happy with his translation. Wow I think this site may cause irritability! Lol. Forgive?
Sorry, I was relating back to your OP statements about debating and questioning the instructor. When you sign in class you do it the instructor's way (or take your class with a different instructor). When you sign in the deaf community, you sign their way.

PFH's excellent videos show you how to sign with the deaf community. :)

As long as you recognize the difference between school work and the real world (and how to adapt to each situation), you should do fine.

Been there, done that. :lol:
 

sallylou

Potterhead and Janeite
Premium Member
Get a lawyer is perfect.

I think that it's called "consult" because you have attorney/client privilege. A lawyer can't ever repeat what a client says w/o client's permission. The limit is that a lawyer can't help a client *commit* a crime. It's really a legal concept, I guess. Get a lawyer is perfect because it has a connotation of protection. I'm sure that I'm over analyzing this. lol
 

Carriez4k

New Member
Yeah, I get what you're saying Reba. My instructor is open to debate and doesn't require that we sign exactly like him. He realizes that we use several different sources and see words/ideas signed several different ways. We use two different text books, and take quizzes on ASL.PRo and Lifeprint. It can be a bit confusing at times, but on the other hand it gets us use to the idea that it's not about being right or wrong just different.

I guess I need to work on my propriety.

Thanks for the feedback!
 

posts from hell

New Member
Get a lawyer is perfect.

I think that it's called "consult" because you have attorney/client privilege. A lawyer can't ever repeat what a client says w/o client's permission. The limit is that a lawyer can't help a client *commit* a crime. It's really a legal concept, I guess. Get a lawyer is perfect because it has a connotation of protection. I'm sure that I'm over analyzing this. lol
Yea.. I see what you mean.

I just signed it the way I would have in real life.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Is consult sign pretty much like advise like it shows on ASL.pro?
Just be careful of directionality when using CONSULT.

In a consultation, one person asks for the advice, and the other person gives it.
 
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