My IEP's rights

DURAY

New Member
VR have IWEP, similar like IEP for college students. Not sure what they are called now.
Why would a deaf kid above 18 years be still in school? Most 18 years old graduated from school in June XXXX. If you're still in HS and graduated at 19 years old in June XXXX, you can take classes at community college.


Is the ASL class for college credit?

Have you taken a placement exam for college?

Have you applied to VR for financial aid for college?
 

jillio

New Member
VR have IWEP, similar like IEP for college students. Not sure what they are called now.
Why would a deaf kid above 18 years be still in school? Most 18 years old graduated from school in June XXXX. If you're still in HS and graduated at 19 years old in June XXXX, you can take classes at community college.
Students in college have to disclose themselves, and set up services themselves through the disability office. No service they have not specifically requested will be provided.

Many kids, deaf and hearing, do not graduate by the time they are 18 years old. In fact, deaf students are eligible for services in the public school until they are 21.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Why would a deaf kid above 18 years be still in school? Most 18 years old graduated from school in June XXXX....
Deaf and hearing students sometimes have to repeat a grade for academic or health reasons. Also, some kids have late birthdays (after the cut-off date), which means they are delayed enrolling in school by one year.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
VR have IWEP, similar like IEP for college students. Not sure what they are called now....
Whatever VR has doesn't apply to the college services. The college disabilities office will work one-on-one with the student to determine what accommodations can be made at the school but it's not an IEP plan. The student usually makes requests, the counselor makes suggestions, and they come to a meeting of the minds about what can be provided at the school. Then, the counselor informs that student's instructors about the accommodations, and makes provisions for them. That is, the disabilities office makes arrangements for providing interpreter services and special equipment. The classroom instructor will follow whatever accommodations are listed in the letter from the disabilities office, such as reserved seating, extra time and/or private testing center for taking tests, Power Point notes, etc. If the student wants tutoring services, he has to make those arrangements himself, just like the hearing students do.

Note: Not all college disabilities offices and counselors are the same. There are the good, the bad, and the ugly.
 

Foxrac

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
Whatever VR has doesn't apply to the college services. The college disabilities office will work one-on-one with the student to determine what accommodations can be made at the school but it's not an IEP plan. The student usually makes requests, the counselor makes suggestions, and they come to a meeting of the minds about what can be provided at the school. Then, the counselor informs that student's instructors about the accommodations, and makes provisions for them. That is, the disabilities office makes arrangements for providing interpreter services and special equipment. The classroom instructor will follow whatever accommodations are listed in the letter from the disabilities office, such as reserved seating, extra time and/or private testing center for taking tests, Power Point notes, etc. If the student wants tutoring services, he has to make those arrangements himself, just like the hearing students do.

Note: Not all college disabilities offices and counselors are the same. There are the good, the bad, and the ugly.
The VR in Alabama can find an interpreter if school is unable to find an interpreter on their own.
 

DURAY

New Member
Reba, yes. Some school districts use social promotion to get rid of students with disabilities so they won't get count under the test scores annually. When I was at Gallaudet, there were so many 17 years old and many had to go to the NWC Prep school for remedial.

Deaf and hearing students sometimes have to repeat a grade for academic or health reasons. Also, some kids have late birthdays (after the cut-off date), which means they are delayed enrolling in school by one year.
 

jillio

New Member
Reba, yes. Some school districts use social promotion to get rid of students with disabilities so they won't get count under the test scores annually. When I was at Gallaudet, there were so many 17 years old and many had to go to the NWC Prep school for remedial.
Uhhhh....that is early graduation, not late.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
I wanted to ultimately go for a teaching degree in special education working with deaf and HoH children since becoming deaf myself. I hope to learn ASL but, the ASL classes here cost a lot. $450 plus a class. How many classes do I take before becoming fluent?
Maybe you could go to SWID or Gally .....or you could contact Texas School for the Deaf and see if there's any good colleges that have a large population of dhh kids you could learn from.
 

Anij

Well-Known Member
For learning ASL - you might also want to look into funding options - as many places have a tuition waiver type set up for people who are Hoh/deaf and wanting to learn ASL to improve their own communication skills etc.

Try contacting any Hoh/deaf organizations or disability organizations in your area and see what they might be able to do, also if you contact the places teaching the classes they might (with proof of being Hoh/deaf) waive some or all fo the cost of the courses.

Also, see if you can claim all or some of the tuition on your taxes - often you can claim that, as well as the cost of any ALDs etc :)
 

silversoul

New Member
HoH and APD

Anij: You are D/HoH and APD?!!?! How do you get tested for APD when you are HoH?

My little sister is Deaf in one ear HoH in other and school says she is APD but can not find a place to test her because APD test use headphones? Any suggestion? Thanks!
 
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