My deaf dog!

Hayden

New Member
I adopted a deaf puppy in June. Her name is Pinkman!

 

authentic

Well-Known Member
I always wanted to adopt a deaf dog, someday I will. Most of my friends offer me a deaf pit bull, I kept saying no. I don't want pit bull. Your dog looks so sweet....please do let me know if you plan to have her produce some puppies.
 

Hayden

New Member
She is fixed. With the amount of deaf and hearing dogs out there that need homes, I could never have one of my dogs have a litter.

Pit bulls are awesome dogs! Pinkie's brother is a hearing rescued pittie!

If you want a deaf dog you should check out Deaf Dogs Rock. They list deaf dogs all over the country.
 

Hayden

New Member
Thank you guys so much for the compliments! Pinkie says "thank you!"

Whatdidyousay, she just turned 5 months old! She is a sweetheart. :)
 

dogmom

Well-Known Member
:Dshe's an adorable little BC mix girlie!

that degree of pink-ness in that mix can be common with a deaf dog.
and I love pitties too!

I've worked with deaf dogs at the shelter.

She really is precious, congrats!
 

whatdidyousay!

Well-Known Member
:Dshe's an adorable little BC mix girlie!

that degree of pink-ness in that mix can be common with a deaf dog.
and I love pitties too!

I've worked with deaf dogs at the shelter.

She really is precious, congrats!
I heard if a Dalmatian does not have a lot of black spots that could mean it deaf. Have you heard of this?
 

dogmom

Well-Known Member
I haven't heard this quite specifically. Dal puppies are born white and develop the spots at about 3 weeks; sometimes Dalmatians have spot colors other than black. Typically called "liver"; also the spots correlate to nose color often.
There are other colors and patterns possible too but they are rare and/or not "accepted" by the national breed clubs. Here's an interesting page on it: http://paisleydals.com/color.html
What I understood was that type, amount and location of pigment all can affect whether a Dal is deaf.
 

whatdidyousay!

Well-Known Member
I haven't heard this quite specifically. Dal puppies are born white and develop the spots at about 3 weeks; sometimes Dalmatians have spot colors other than black. Typically called "liver"; also the spots correlate to nose color often.
There are other colors and patterns possible too but they are rare and/or not "accepted" by the national breed clubs. Here's an interesting page on it: http://paisleydals.com/color.html
What I understood was that type, amount and location of pigment all can affect whether a Dal is deaf.
I was once talking to a guy about Dalmatians lacking spots could be deaf and the guy pulled out his pen and pretend to made black dots on my arm. It was very funny! I also heard firemen used Dalmatians b/c they are deaf .
 

dogmom

Well-Known Member
Black dots...hehe...if he'd had a brown marker he could made brown spots for the chocolate colored spots on the liver Dals, like in the link.

At one time the very athletic Dalmatians in the U.S. were used as deterrents underneath and/or ahead of fire carts or carriages, to ward off people from getting in the way of or messing with the horses and the equipment. Before that they ran with the horse-drawn coaches in England to create the same sense of presence, clearing the way for the horses.
Today there are competitive events with horses and carts or coaches that simulate those jobs. They are almost like marathons with the Dalmatian and the horse being judged on how well they stick together and distance. They're rare events in relation to other dog sports but they do happen. Dals are very high-energy, with a lot of stamina, and it's a way for the dog to do what he was bred for. Example: http://www.woodwynd.com/road-trials.html

The deafness is related only to the way the pigmentation works in some breeds, including the Dalmatian.
 

whatdidyousay!

Well-Known Member
Black dots...hehe...if he'd had a brown marker he could made brown spots for the chocolate colored spots on the liver Dals, like in the link.

At one time the very athletic Dalmatians in the U.S. were used as deterrents underneath and/or ahead of fire carts or carriages, to ward off people from getting in the way of or messing with the horses and the equipment. Before that they ran with the horse-drawn coaches in England to create the same sense of presence, clearing the way for the horses.
Today there are competitive events with horses and carts or coaches that simulate those jobs. They are almost like marathons with the Dalmatian and the horse being judged on how well they stick together and distance. They're rare events in relation to other dog sports but they do happen. Dals are very high-energy, with a lot of stamina, and it's a way for the dog to do what he was bred for. Example: http://www.woodwynd.com/road-trials.html

The deafness is related only to the way the pigmentation works in some breeds, including the Dalmatian.
I don't think I had seen anyone with a Dalmatian in my city , I do see a lot
small white dogs .
 

dogmom

Well-Known Member
I see loads of small white dogs too, they're just very common.
Not SO many Dalmatians here, but I've seen some. Don't think any have come into the store where I work yet, at least not on the days I work there.
I thought this was an interesting show of a Dal showing what they can do like in my previous post. It's uTube video, says it has captions. I clicked on them and nothing, but if interested I thought to share the link because there is nice video showing the different exercises dog, horse and rider can compete in together: [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1Sy7kRoaR8[/ame]
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Wonder if you know the breeder? The registries would probably like to look into that breeder, as what you have there is close to a lethal white, and the result of very careless breeding.
 
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