Moisture problem?

Discussion in 'Hearing Aids & Cochlear Implants' started by Gene1984, Aug 14, 2009.

  1. Gene1984

    Gene1984 New Member

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    I have this problem where something, possibly moisture, in my ear canal blocks the tube in my hearing aid mold and prevents sound from getting through, and when I move my ear mold around in my ear, the blockage goes away. However, it gets so bad that I have to do the readjustment every five seconds.

    For a while, I thought it was ear wax, because two wednesdays ago, my doctor's nurse irrigated my ear, and the problem went away. Then this past monday, the problem returned, and is getting worse every day.

    I think it is moisture, but I'm not sure, because one day, I took it out before going to bed, then put it back on the next morning without taking a shower, but the problem still occurred.

    Does anyone know a solution?
     
  2. Jiro

    Jiro If You Know What I Mean Premium Member

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    1. quick-fix solution while you're on street - just take it off and blow the tube to let out the water inside the tube and viola!
    2. before you sleep, put your HA in Dry & Store
     
  3. VamPyroX

    VamPyroX bloody phreak from hell

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    It's often related to having moist ears and/or moist earmold tubes.

    When it's a bit moist, it will get soaked easily. The same goes for your ears. That's what happens when there's a little moisture and it gets trapped in an enclosed environment that's warm. If you're dry and get in a sauna, you'll just get hot and almost sweat. If you're already wet and get in a sauna, you'll start sweating bullets.

    So, my best advice would be to dry out your ears every time you bathe/shower. Also, blow out your earmold tubes if you see moisture in them. Works for me. :)

    (Sometimes, not drying your ears before putting in hearing aids can often lead to ear infections.)

    It also helps to have a dry & store container for your hearing aid. I have one. :)
     
  4. Gene1984

    Gene1984 New Member

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    Is it possible that it my be my ear producing excess moisture? If so, is it something that can be treated with medicines?
     
  5. Jiro

    Jiro If You Know What I Mean Premium Member

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    yes everybody sweats differently. and no sweating cannot be fixed with medicine. there are few steps you can do to lessen the moisture build-up. see above
     
  6. Gene1984

    Gene1984 New Member

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    Okay, thank you for your help, everyone! :)
     
  7. VamPyroX

    VamPyroX bloody phreak from hell

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    Yeah, that's right.

    I've often found sounds to appear nasal or like I'm underwater... if I take a shower and forget to dry out my ears.

    I use a dry & store (what I have is called Super Dri-Aid) for my digital hearing aid. When I start to sweat heavily, I take off my hearing aid to prevent damage and excess moisture. If things start to sound nasal, I will check the tube. If it's dry, then I know it's the inside of my ear. (This often happens when I take a shower and forget to dry my ears.) If the tube is moist, I'll blow it out. I'll double check my ears in case they're moist too. This always does the trick for me.

    The only time this doesn't is when it's during cold season and my head is a bit congested, but this has only happened once or twice. It also happens on an airplane due to the air pressure in the cabin. So, I simply pop my ears. ;)
     
  8. Watermelon

    Watermelon New Member

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    It could be earwax in the tube too. You can use warm water and mild soap and soak the ear mold part, and it should help dissolve the stray wax. Don't get the hearing aid wet! And, dry it out afterwards, prior to use.
     
  9. Jiro

    Jiro If You Know What I Mean Premium Member

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    it is preferable to use hydrogen peroxide solution (available at any stores - very cheap) for that instead of water and soap. it will disinfect your tube and it's much easier to dry out.
     
  10. Watermelon

    Watermelon New Member

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    Yes, that is true. Hydrogen peroxide is better.
     
  11. john57

    john57 New Member

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    What I use to dry out my ears in the hot summer is my mixture of alcohol, a bit of water and a bit of distilled white vinegar which just makes the ears cannals just a bit acid to prevent fungus. I put the mixure into a dropper bottle and put in a few drops in when I go to bed with the hearing aid out. This is the same as a formula sold in stores for swimmer ears.

    John
     

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