Mainstream schools

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
Depends I guess. I went to a private school and "mainstreamed" (as in totally on my own with no support whatsoever). The education I got was top notch but the social side of things suffered greatly.
 

peekaboo

Well-Known Member
Depends I guess. I went to a private school and "mainstreamed" (as in totally on my own with no support whatsoever). The education I got was top notch but the social side of things suffered greatly.
same here minus the private school.
 

Barrufet

New Member
First of all, I'm gonna make clear that my native language is Spanish, so I'm still learning english and you'll see something that doesn't fit at all in the message.
My case is HoH and public school!

The positive things about mainstream schools/highschools are that you "grow up" on the hearing world, so you can see how hearing people do interact, interact with them and etc.. I guess(?). Everyone is so different
Other things are the education that you get, as DeafDucky said, you get a really good education, but I'm going to say that there's an exception for me. You probably get the education, but if you don't pay attention when someone is explaining something or you can't hear or X, then you won't get it, so what I mean to say here is my experience, there are people who told me "How can you don't know this or X" is so basic or something like that, and I just didn't hear it in the moment or didn't pay attention because I wasn't hearing good to the person who was explaining or etc...
I don't know if I made it clear.

The social part is like 10/90.
In my primary education, I was sooooooo lucky to have classmates who were so good with me, respectful and they did let me integrate in the group. That kinda surprises me, but I guess the teacher at the moment did help me a lot and my mom of course.
But when I went to highschool (12years old) things went go really bad, on social part and the studies part too... The people with who I went on school weren't the same of the highschool.

I still do not regret going to a mainstream school, because I've developed things that I couldn't do if I didn't go.
 

vegandreamer

Active Member
I went to a mainstream school and a PHU (Partial hearing unit). Socially the PHU was better. It was good to have other hearing impaired kids to be friends with. Accademically it wasn't so good as we didn't learn any sign language (it was all strictly oral) and the teachers expected me to listen with hearing aids without even writing on the blackboard which happened more at my first mainstream school.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
I went to a mainstream school and a PHU (Partial hearing unit). Socially the PHU was better. It was good to have other hearing impaired kids to be friends with. Accademically it wasn't so good as we didn't learn any sign language (it was all strictly oral) and the teachers expected me to listen with hearing aids without even writing on the blackboard which happened more at my first mainstream school.
No writing on the blackboard?!?!?!?/
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
No writing on the blackboard?!?!?!?/
Oh yeah... in elementary school, they did write on board sometimes for math and learning english sentence structure... but never did spelling words (and why I failed several quizzes in 6th grade. Parents and I finally convinced teacher to write them on board at the beginning of the week so we could copy them to study. Friday she gave them orally for quiz (oh yay... but by that point I knew what to listen for then guess best I could- grades did improve tho...).

High school...I honestly don't remember much use of the blackboard...(not the easiest thing to see/read depending on the 'writing pressure'/style of the teacher.... whiteboard might have been better... maybe).
 

Jane B.

Well-Known Member
Showing my age — whiteboards did not exist when I was in elementary and high school. Blackboards were used in both though.
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
My elementary school had some of the greenboards. I am sure they all have whiteboards by now. I find it easier to read it on dark board as long as the cursive handwriting style is clear and articulate. I am a 40 years old and all of my elementary teachers were trained to write cursive style at a young age. I don't see that anymore.

In middle school and high schools, they used whiteboards, but I hate it when their big markers ran out. Some teachers are horrible at re-stocking markers. One of my middle school teachers turned to his overhead projector, because his big markers ran out and he had to look for a marker. He found a sharpie pen from his desk instead. Argh. I really hate overhead project.

There is a cool local company from Sweden. It is called whitelines. Dark lines can distract your eyes, so they changed it to white lines. Niceeeee.

https://www.whitelinespaper.com/
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
Showing my age — whiteboards did not exist when I was in elementary and high school. Blackboards were used in both though.

White boards didn't typically show up in classrooms until at least the late 1990s. I may be off on the year as I keep wanting to say they didn't become widespread until the 2000s.

And some schools probably DO still use blackboards (black and green ones).

In middle school and high schools, they used whiteboards, but I hate it when their big markers ran out.
Hm so my guessimate of the 1990s is about right... asking a friend of mine who is 48 (can't ask her hubby who is a bit younger as he's out at sea right now).
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
Hm so my guessimate of the 1990s is about right... asking a friend of mine who is 48 (can't ask her hubby who is a bit younger as he's out at sea right now).
I remember my older half-brother saying most of his writing, science and math classes in their schools have been updated except the music and art departments.
 

mikemike

Member
most counties and medium/large cities have one school for ES, MS, and HS kids who are fully signing deaf.
My mainstream school were good, social good, academic, good.
 
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