It's up for debate, or is it?

rebeccalj

New Member
Keep in mind that NOT all deaf people are bilingual. I've seen someone with PURE ASL that even can't write properly (the "written" ASL).
That is something that even *I* confused for the longest time. I couldn't understand why some deafies are easy to understand and others write like they are doing ASL.
 

LinuxGold

Active Member
Same me. Iambic pentameter same rhythm. Much feeling.
Iambic pentameter like love making, oceanic and silky waves,

"to BE or NOT to BE..."

driving into lover's mound

*ahem*

sorry everyone, me picture too much, wow, pin *pop* mind gone

back to debate or no not debate lol
 

rebeccalj

New Member
For the sake of opening up this debate, I'm going to make an assumption about the OP: even though you are deaf and, yes, you DO think differently than a normal hearing person, your native language is still English. Is this correct?

I don't see how you can't think in English given that it is your first language (you didn't mention if you ever learned ASL, btw). Certainly you wouldn't use English to think the same way that a hearing person does, but the thoughts in your mind are still based on English morphemes. For someone who's native language is ASL, their thoughts are often articulated in pictures, even by seeing the handshapes for signs. Is this how you think?

I just want to get a better idea of what you mean here. I know that deaf/hoh people think differently than hearies, and the reasons are both language-based, and neurologically-based, but there is a huge difference between using English as internal language and using ASL/visual code as an internal language, and it seems to me that your internal language is still based on English.

And as for Rambo... the guy is a complete moron.
I learned sign from birth. I started to learn Canadien English around the age of five when I was sent to a regular school and was no longer allowed to sign. I've since picked ASL back up though I have nobody, other than my boyfriend and my kids, to practise it with.
 

rebeccalj

New Member
Me think deaf people ponder that wow different world.

First imagine picture, act, how respond that me do do how that me think.

How how change picture that hearing can match understand what me mean.

Me try word match picture, action different ways, translate to sentence.

Dont care mistake in grammar, important bring from mind to paper.

Finish mind blank nothing left, then watch what sentence say.

Turn mind off, put on hearing mind, word order order perfect must.

The an are is etc, articles important add must.

Make sure grammar no error, that perfect, pah ready show, that my express!

That.
I don't know if you were trying to be humourous or not but this is often how I think. Maybe not quite that lacking in grammar though. It reads like ASL text to me, or, how I would sign that.
 

TWA

New Member
Premium Member
I learned sign from birth. I started to learn Canadien English around the age of five when I was sent to a regular school and was no longer allowed to sign. I've since picked ASL back up though I have nobody, other than my boyfriend and my kids, to practise it with.
Well this is a HUGE distinction to make. Between the ages of 0-5 is the "critical period" for language acquisition. By the age of five, your neural pathways had been hardwired for a visual language. So it makes sense that you've always felt that you think differently, even if your English skills are quite good.
 

LinuxGold

Active Member
I don't know if you were trying to be humourous or not but this is often how I think. Maybe not quite that lacking in grammar though. It reads like ASL text to me, or, how I would sign that.
I'm not being humorous. That is how I communicate using ASL as spoken language, showing audience how it is done, the ASL way.
 

TWA

New Member
Premium Member
BTW, I'm curious: how did you learn sign from birth until it was suddenly disallowed at the age of five? Were there deaf members in your family who signed with you as a baby?
 

jillio

New Member
I don't know if you were trying to be humourous or not but this is often how I think. Maybe not quite that lacking in grammar though. It reads like ASL text to me, or, how I would sign that.
That is exactly what LG was doing. ASL text.
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
I don't know if you were trying to be humourous or not but this is often how I think. Maybe not quite that lacking in grammar though. It reads like ASL text to me, or, how I would sign that.
Didn't you say you sign ASL?? :dunno:
 

rebeccalj

New Member
I'm not being humorous. That is how I communicate using ASL as spoken language, showing audience how it is done, the ASL way.
Oh, okay, well I understood you. :giggle: For me, I kind of start out like that and translate in my head what the proper English word would be. I still make many mistakes. For example, I always seem to type now when I mean not. When you use the wrong word around hearies they can mistake your meaning.
 

LinuxGold

Active Member
Oh, okay, well I understood you. :giggle: For me, I kind of start out like that and translate in my head what the proper English word would be. I still make many mistakes. For example, I always seem to type now when I mean not. When you use the wrong word around hearies they can mistake your meaning.
Our common weakness: Articles. (the, is, are, an, a etc...)

I am on eternal struggle to completely understand how articles work.
 

rebeccalj

New Member
BTW, I'm curious: how did you learn sign from birth until it was suddenly disallowed at the age of five? Were there deaf members in your family who signed with you as a baby?
Well, it's a rather long story. I touch on it in another thread, "What Ticks You Off About Hearies?" My mother left me at the hospital when it was discovered that I was born Deaf, auntie and uncle took me home and immediately started with baby sign. My Mum took me back just before the age of one; still teaching me sign. I'm sent to normal/mainstream school and she wanted me to be normal like everyone else. My Mum wouldn't allow anymore ASL in the house. She needed me to be normal or she felt that people would look down on us and treat me like I was retarded.
 

rebeccalj

New Member
Didn't you say you sign ASL?? :dunno:
Yes, but I'm not familiar with online ASL. Typing it out like that. I understood it but I'm not used to seeing that.

I've never belonged to an online Deaf community before so you'll have to forgive my lack of knowledge on certain things.
 

LinuxGold

Active Member
Yes, but I'm not familiar with online ASL. Typing it out like that. I understood it but I'm not used to seeing that.

I've never belonged to an online Deaf community before so you'll have to forgive my lack of knowledge or certain things.
Rebecca, do you live near or in deaf community?
 
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