Is it ever ok for kids NOT to use ASL?

Discussion in 'Sign Language & Deaf Education' started by faire_jour, Feb 8, 2009.

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  1. faire_jour

    faire_jour New Member

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    Is there ever a situation in which it is ok for a child with a hearing loss NOT to be given ASL?
    A mild hearing loss?
    Post lingually deafened?

    Is it ever ok?
     
  2. shel90

    shel90 Audist are not welcome Premium Member

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    The risks for limited language access and language delays increases when not giving deaf or hoh children ASL.

    In my opinion, taking that risk is not ok so to answer your question..no.

    As u can see in so many posts made my hoh people with their frustrations of missing out what is being said, why do that to children?
     
  3. faire_jour

    faire_jour New Member

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    Ok, so you are completly against parental choice? You believe that all children with a hearing loss should be educated in the same enviroment (bi-bi) regardless of their residual hearing, capacity for spoken language, or even their own desire?
     
  4. shel90

    shel90 Audist are not welcome Premium Member

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    I have seen what happens when children are denied full access to language and have no first language. It is not fair to the children. Why take that risk? I believe in giving both to all children.
     
  5. faire_jour

    faire_jour New Member

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    And if a child choses to discontinue sign? Is that ok? (I have seen it happen. I have a friend who cries because her son REFUSES to sign now. They still use it for their younger daughter, but the son does NOT want it)
     
  6. shel90

    shel90 Audist are not welcome Premium Member

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    As long as they are understanding everything around them and still developing language at the age appropriate level, then it is up to them. How old is the child?
     
  7. faire_jour

    faire_jour New Member

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    He completly stopped using ASL at age 3, he is now 8.
     
  8. dreama

    dreama New Member

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    No. Sign language should ALWAYS be an option.
     
  9. shel90

    shel90 Audist are not welcome Premium Member

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    Can he fully understand everything being said around him at all times especially in the academic setting?

    Is he around only hearing kids? Is he ashamed of using ASL?
     
  10. faire_jour

    faire_jour New Member

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    Nope. His sister is also deaf. The family uses ASL at home, all the time.

    He is doing great in school. He was never given an IEP, because he scored far above average on all his testing, starting in pre-school. Mom fought to get a placement at the Deaf school and failed. He learned too read before Kindergarten, and now reads above grade level.
     
  11. shel90

    shel90 Audist are not welcome Premium Member

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    It is obvious his first language in ASL and his family involvement gave him the good start to literacy skills. I applaud them.
     
  12. Berry

    Berry New Member

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    Let me put it this way; the way I see it.

    How much does the safety of your child concern you?

    The criminal mind looks for easy victims who cannot defend themselves or be able to describe what has been done to them. This is one reason you never leave a young, pre-lingual child unsupervised.

    The sooner a child acquires language the safer it is.

    The fastest language any child, hearing or deaf, can acquire is ASL.
     
  13. faire_jour

    faire_jour New Member

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    That isn't an answer at all.
     
  14. Alisteal

    Alisteal New Member

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    I feel it should always be offered. My oldest child now 5 had some hearing loss as a young child, we taught her English and asl. Her hearing loss was cured by tubes in her ears. She stopped signing a lot. However now that I'm starting to learn asl again she's picking it up quicker then I am
     
  15. Mrs Bucket

    Mrs Bucket New Member

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    Actually faire_jour, Berry gave a good example of why ASL should always be kept as an option for communication.

    "Bad man hurt bum." *points to area of pain*

    If the child had not been exposed to pain, how do you think the child would try to express the experience and the pain?

    My hearing nephew signed at 9 months old - milk, more, dog, cookie, finish, stop and by the time he was 1, he could sign and talk.

    He's almost 4 and now is multilingual. ASL, English and Spanish.
     
  16. shel90

    shel90 Audist are not welcome Premium Member

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    Awesome!I wanted that for my daughter...for her to be multilingual..ASL, English and Spanish but my ex hubby didnt use Spanish with her on a consistent basis so her Spanish never became fluent so she is bilingual. Your nephew will have more opportunities by being multilingual!
     
  17. Mrs Bucket

    Mrs Bucket New Member

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    Believe me, it is wonderful to be multilingual.

    My nephew points up to the sky at night and says "Estrellas!", when he was a little baby, we would always watch Dora the Explorer so that helped, too!

    "Dora.. and Boots too!!" :lol:
     
  18. Berry

    Berry New Member

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    Actually you are right. It is what I consider a compelling reason.

    To my way of thinking an answer itself is never as important as how the person obtained it. For instance I give more weight to Shel90's experiences than I do to her opinion. Knowing her experiences I know and understand her opinion without her having to state it.

    Thus I respect her, her experiences, and her opinion.

    Just the way my mind works is all.
     
  19. faire_jour

    faire_jour New Member

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    But I'm not just talking about very young children. I'm asking if it is ever ok for a child with a hearing loss to NOT be given sign language.
     
  20. Berry

    Berry New Member

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    I also wanted this for all of my children and grandchildren, but as I was the only one in my house who signed or spoke Spanish, and I spent my summers when they were little working as much as 16 and 20 hours a day seven days a week it was impossible to accomplish.
     
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