Interpreter On Demand...

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
#1
Went to see my doctor today...and for the first time, they used the Interpreter on Demand Video...guessing it's called VRI...anyway, had no problem with it at all...enjoyed the chat with the operator (from Pa.) My doctor said they were no longer using "live" interpreters...Guessing live Interpreter Agencies are gonna be losing a lot of business.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
#2
I have no idea if VRI is cheaper than in-person interpreters. It might be a "convenience" issue on behalf of the staff having to call an agency to schedule an interpreter? Where I go, they have a contract with an agency so I've been able to get an interpreter at all my appointments even with just an hour or two's notice.
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
#3
The VRI Lady said it was cheaper....and more convenient...such as:...Interpreter has an accident...gets sick...late...and the cost of paying the agency...(not sure how much they do charge)...I noticed too they can chose a male or a female interpreter on the screen...
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
#4
The VRI Lady said it was cheaper....and more convenient...such as:...Interpreter has an accident...gets sick...late...and the cost of paying the agency...(not sure how much they do charge)...I noticed too they can chose a male or a female interpreter on the screen...
That's very cool that you get a choice of interpreters.
 

Calvin

In Hazzard County
Super Moderator
Premium Member
#5
When I have appointment, they use VRI... I have no issues so far. I figured it is cheaper for them to use VRI.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
#8
Interesting... I wonder if the VRI would spill over to universities/colleges if it hasn't already. For long term (3 months in my case) I like and prefer at least a regular interpreter. I've had 9 interpreters so far lol but that's due to the various terps' schedules... there are 4 main 'regular' interpreters. So far it's been a great experience (mostly- I'll keep my views private lol). Never used VRI yet- as I don't tend to use interpreters for doctor appointments in general.

Thinking back- I kind of wish I HAD asked for one when I had to go to the ER in 2004...
 

zephren

Active Member
#9
Glad to see you had a good terp experience at the doctor's office. I recall your other thread about the agency kept sending you male terps when you explicitly requested a female.

I have used both VRI and live. I never noticed a choice of gender option but I never thought of that. There are pros and cons of live vs VRI. Theorectically, VRI should be easy and immediate but too often places are not trained in how it works. I have had to show staff a few times how to use their devices. I do like that if I need to cancel an appointment I don't have to worry about them needing to cancel and resched a live terp as well. VRI can sometimes freeze but so far that hasn't been too bad.

VRI is fine for a one-on-one conversation without too many other things going on. I do find that with a live terp I get more of the full picture - info about background sounds, conversation while we are moving around from room to room (with VRI it is hard to do until you get to the new location). VRI can be a bit more delayed which makes it harder to interrupt if you need further clarification or repetition.

I am glad to have either option over writing backing and forth.
 

Foxrac

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
#10
Before my vision got worse, I used VRI few times at emergency room, but it was temporarily until they could find a real interpreter and VRI via Skype on my laptop when I was college student, so it was mediocre because internet connection wasn't good at university, even IT guy told me that ethernet did deliver up to 5 Gbps, but he had to throttle down to 100 Mbps due to university policy, so no students are allowed to use ethernet in classes and academic halls, beside dorms, unless it is extreme case like you have to use VRI via Skype, so still lagging but slightly better than WiFi.

After my vision got worse, VRI didn't work out for me due to missing information and told them that I'm DB and need have access to real interpreter with tactile, either VASL, TASL and PTASL, so finally, they did find one and have no issue with them, but it take few days to week to find one.
 
#11
i have had to use it, i have migraine and cluster headache issues. i have had decent interpreters here and there, but i lose central vision with a severe headache and i struggle to be cogent, use all 'parts of speech'... horrible in that moment unless a hearing friend is there to monitor. my hearing friend, at one point was like, 'this is ridiculous, she said...' and it was a huge thing that was messed up throughout the visit, crucially important.
another time they clicked the interpreter on and off, so i had to educate each one that popped up, i don't have the energy to train each terp as i am there in pain, unable to really take care of myself (i mean that is why i go to the ER, i've exhausted my coping skills) and then i have to repeatedly take care of the interpreter who pops up. IT SUCKS and it means the onerous to my medical care is on me!
it also makes it hard to see the terp, small, 2 dimensional and vertical, when i am mostly horizontal-> it is fine for the 'until a live terp can get there' but there is no way this is another solution to providing equal access. it. is. far. from. equal. access!
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
#12
i have had to use it, i have migraine and cluster headache issues. i have had decent interpreters here and there, but i lose central vision with a severe headache and i struggle to be cogent, use all 'parts of speech'... horrible in that moment unless a hearing friend is there to monitor. my hearing friend, at one point was like, 'this is ridiculous, she said...' and it was a huge thing that was messed up throughout the visit, crucially important.
another time they clicked the interpreter on and off, so i had to educate each one that popped up, i don't have the energy to train each terp as i am there in pain, unable to really take care of myself (i mean that is why i go to the ER, i've exhausted my coping skills) and then i have to repeatedly take care of the interpreter who pops up. IT SUCKS and it means the onerous to my medical care is on me!
it also makes it hard to see the terp, small, 2 dimensional and vertical, when i am mostly horizontal-> it is fine for the 'until a live terp can get there' but there is no way this is another solution to providing equal access. it. is. far. from. equal. access!
The onus is on you. I dunno about the onerous.
Kick some ass.
 

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