Interning with a local school system.

guido

New Member
As I'm entering my last semester at my ITP, one of my requirements is to find an internship for the duration of the semester. I managed to land one with the school system where I live, in which I will be shadowing interpreters, and perhaps taking on some light-duty interpreting. The interpreting director insists that I keep a notebook of my observations, questions, etc. I'm pretty excited about the opportunity to get some real world experience, and I hope this may develop into a paid position. So with that said, do any terps, administrators, or deafies have any advice for me to get the best out of this experience? Things I should consider while I have this position? Etc.
 

LeighASL

New Member
As I'm entering my last semester at my ITP, one of my requirements is to find an internship for the duration of the semester. I managed to land one with the school system where I live, in which I will be shadowing interpreters, and perhaps taking on some light-duty interpreting. The interpreting director insists that I keep a notebook of my observations, questions, etc. I'm pretty excited about the opportunity to get some real world experience, and I hope this may develop into a paid position. So with that said, do any terps, administrators, or deafies have any advice for me to get the best out of this experience? Things I should consider while I have this position? Etc.
Have fun with it! I'm doing my practicum now for my ITP and I recieved a position at my college. I had to take a skills test, and they allowed me to interpret solo. I did some shadow interp in the past, and I brought a notebook and observed, and I wrote down questions as I went. I sat in the back behind the class and the student, and would sign along with the interp (no one could see me except teacher and interp, and I first asked interps permission if this would be alright). If there were differences or I wasn't certain the way I need to sign something, I'd write it down and ask later. I also started to sit more towards the side once the class went on and would practice reading the Deaf student. In a couple weeks the interp asked the student if it was alright that I'd interpret a class for them, and they didn't mind. I was extremely nervous, but you'll be surprised how well you'll do. I also took comments and corrections from the Deaf student. They're really the only people to learn from.

You'll learn more in practicum than you have in all years of your ASL classes. It's the best!
 
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