Hypocrisy?

SkullChick

New Member
One thing struck me when watching sweet nothing in my ear in court setting, when lawyer said "why is it that you received government money for disability, recieves disability service but you guys said you're not disabled?" (I know its not right word for word but you get the idea)
And I notice few of post complaining for people calling deaf disabled and/or handicap so it brought me to put up an thread to discuss this.

So if you claim not to be disabled only deaf. Then why do you receive disability check? Why do you receive disability service and supports such as CART, interpreter, notetaker, FM system, hearing aid, cochlear implant, free health insurance, and so on? Shouldn't you not receive all those because you're not disabiled or handicap and can do anything like hearing people can do except hear?
Isn't that hypocrisy?

And for my opinion I agreed that deaf/hoh are disabled and handicap because the defination for those terms are not have the ability, and we are disabled by not having the ability to hear, and that's is it, it doesn't define anything more than our hearing impairment.

Discuss.
 

Oceanbreeze

New Member
Well, you asked a very loaded question, Skullchick! Get ready for a very heated debate! :giggle:

But, to expound on your question...

I must say I agree with you that it seems hypocritical to take government assistance such as SSI/SSDI, as well as the other things you mentioned and claim that one is not disabled.

In order to even qualify for SSI, one must be deemed "disabled", so in a literal since one is disabled. Like you, I believe that one's deafness should NOT take away from one's ability to carry on in his daily life, but by definition, I agree with your opinion!

Incidently, I am hearing, but was born with a physical disability. I consider myself disabled and always have, but does that "define" me as a person or indicate I'm incapable of functioning in daily life? No. To me, it doesn't. But, it's also a statement of fact in my mind. :)

As for other people's perception of me and my "condition", I say "screw 'em". I can do or not do anything I put my mind to. I am only hindered by societie's narrow mindedness.
 
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rockdrummer

Guest
One thing struck me when watching sweet nothing in my ear in court setting, when lawyer said "why is it that you received government money for disability, recieves disability service but you guys said you're not disabled?" (I know its not right word for word but you get the idea)
And I notice few of post complaining for people calling deaf disabled and/or handicap so it brought me to put up an thread to discuss this.

So if you claim not to be disabled only deaf. Then why do you receive disability check? Why do you receive disability service and supports such as CART, interpreter, notetaker, FM system, hearing aid, cochlear implant, free health insurance, and so on? Shouldn't you not receive all those because you're not disabiled or handicap and can do anything like hearing people can do except hear?
Isn't that hypocrisy?

And for my opinion I agreed that deaf/hoh are disabled and handicap because the defination for those terms are not have the ability, and we are disabled by not having the ability to hear, and that's is it, it doesn't define anything more than our hearing impairment.

Discuss.
I tend to agree with you and I was kind of shocked when I first learned that some deafies don't consider themselves disabled or handicapped when "by definition" they are. I do respect those that don't want to be labled as such but I also agree that they should not enjoy any of the benefits then either. Personally I don't believe folks should be offended by definitions. They are just words to describe something.
 

Oceanbreeze

New Member
I tend to agree with you and I was kind of shocked when I first learned that some deafies don't consider themselves disabled or handicapped when "by definition" they are. I do respect those that don't want to be labled as such but I also agree that they should not enjoy any of the benefits then either. Personally I don't believe folks should be offended by definitions. They are just words to describe something.
:gpost:

I agree with you. I don't understand why people get all bent out of shape insisting they are not disabled, especially when those same people are getting government assistance.
 

SkullChick

New Member
Well, you asked a very loaded question, Skullchick! Get ready for a very heated debate! :giggle:
Lol yeah :lol:
I'm very aware of this going to upset some people or lit the flame to start heated debate but this is one biggest question about deaf people and their reason behind the hypocrisy you know? I had to ask because it been lingering in my mind for a while.
 

Oceanbreeze

New Member
Lol yeah :lol:
I'm very aware of this going to upset some people or lit the flame to start heated debate but this is one biggest question about deaf people and their reason behind the hypocrisy you know? I had to ask because it been lingering in my mind for a while.
Yup! You're not the only one who has wondered this ,but I think it's better for a deafie to ask the question, than say, a hearie like me :giggle:

Good thread, but expect it to go to the dogs pretty quick!
 

Hwy99

New Member
I do understand what you mean, it's hypocrisy to say that they are not disablity while they get the SSI or SSDI.

But I still disagree to stop deafies from receiving the SSI or SSDI because if they can't get one, then as many as half of deafies probably will not able to live on their own because they will have very hard time to find a job due too many deafies would do anything to get a job that are perfect for the deafies, and it's not easy to find a job or manager would accept the deafies.
 

SkullChick

New Member
I do understand what you mean, it's hypocrisy to say that they are not disablity while they get the SSI or SSDI.

But I still disagree to stop deafies from receiving the SSI or SSDI because if they can't get one, then as many as half of deafies probably will not able to live on their own because they will have very hard time to find a job due too many deafies would do anything to get a job that are perfect for the deafies, and it's not easy to find a job or manager would accept the deafies.
Well welcome to real world, not only deaf people struggle to get an job. Everyone even hearing people have hard time getting job and so many of hearing people have absolutely no benefit from their job such as decent health insurance coverage, support, and service I must said deaf people are spoiled compared to hearing people they work their butt off to get an job, education, housing and transportation.
All I think for deaf people who claimed they're not disabled should grow some balls and face the real world hardship to prove they can do anything like hearing people otherwise they're hypocrite. Now nobody want to be hypocrite don't they?

Ask any hearing people if they have easy life, easy time find house, car, health insurance, dental plan, etc I guarantee they will say no. But how they got all those? They hard work for it. Now people who sat they ARE disabled and receive benefits that's fine because it is for disabled people.
 

Cheri

Prayers for my dad.
Premium Member
There is no "us" versus "them" view, Deaf people should be allow to labeled themselves the way they see fit, There are differences between hearing and deaf communities and cultures. Just because we can't hear doesn't make us disability.

Just because some deaf people received government checks, is because maybe they were being discriminated on getting hire on a job, no matter how qualified they may be.

I have a friend that came and visited me, and spoken in a different language, and I had to translating the spoken language into English does that mean this person is disability because she speak a different language? Just because deaf people have their interpreters, everyone has the right to know what is being said, it doesn't mean that person is disability.

To be honest hearing people don't know anything about deafness as much they would like to think they do, to know how it is to be deaf, is to be deaf, and you'll understand. ;)
 

jillio

New Member
Perhaps it is because the ADA's and SSA's definition of a person with a deisability differs from personal definition of disabled. One can have a disability without being disabled.
 
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rockdrummer

Guest
It's funny how we can bend the definitions of words to meet our needs. The concise definition of superior vs. the concise definition of disabled or handicapped. Personally I tend to adhere to definitions as described by the dictionaries. Many words have multiple definitions with some still evolving. I would have to go back to search but if I recall, Interperator (sp?) gave me a good answer on the topic of words and their definitions and how they evolve. I still say they are just words to describe something and to say disabled or handicapped is not (to me) a bad thing.
 

SkullChick

New Member
There is no "us" versus "them" view, Deaf people should be allow to labeled themselves the way they see fit, There are differences between hearing and deaf communities and cultures. Just because we can't hear doesn't make us disability.

Just because some deaf people received government checks, is because maybe they were being discriminated on getting hire on a job, no matter how qualified they may be.

I have a friend that came and visited me, and spoken in a different language, and I had to translating the spoken language into English does that mean this person is disability because she speak a different language? Just because deaf people have their interpreters, everyone has the right to know what is being said, it doesn't mean that person is disability.

To be honest hearing people don't know anything about deafness as much they would like to think they do, to know how it is to be deaf, is to be deaf, and you'll understand. ;)
I'm deaf.
Pay close attention to the word DISABLED
Dis-abled
Don't have ability to hear.
That what deaf mean right?
Hence deaf is an disability.
No matter how much deaf people hate that word it is what they have. And it have absolutely no defination of who they are and what they have ability in all other things, only their hearing ability.
And for non-english speaker they're foreign people so they get foreign service and support.
 

sleepytaz

New Member
Disabled? Maybe so... Maybe not....

One thing struck me when watching sweet nothing in my ear in court setting, when lawyer said "why is it that you received government money for disability, recieves disability service but you guys said you're not disabled?" (I know its not right word for word but you get the idea)
And I notice few of post complaining for people calling deaf disabled and/or handicap so it brought me to put up an thread to discuss this.

So if you claim not to be disabled only deaf. Then why do you receive disability check? Why do you receive disability service and supports such as CART, interpreter, notetaker, FM system, hearing aid, cochlear implant, free health insurance, and so on? Shouldn't you not receive all those because you're not disabiled or handicap and can do anything like hearing people can do except hear?
Isn't that hypocrisy?

And for my opinion I agreed that deaf/hoh are disabled and handicap because the defination for those terms are not have the ability, and we are disabled by not having the ability to hear, and that's is it, it doesn't define anything more than our hearing impairment.

Discuss.
Skullchick,

You bring up some very good thoughts on the issue of hypocrisy among d/Deaf people who does not label themselves as diabled, but still recieve SDDI/SSI and free health care or whatever.

That is the purpose why I strongly believe that all able bodied d/Deaf people should be working as any other hearing people. I, myself, am working and I had to earn my health benfits from my job. If I don't, I can buy some sort of a health insurance, dental plans and such. As for CART/Interpreter... by ADA law which is under disabled... that's where I'm more silence on... I'd rather be able to understand and be understood and stand up that I have rights. I don't label myself disabled and I don't like hearing it, but I just go with the flow with ADA laws that gives us the rights for interpreters and such....

Am I a hypocrisy?
 

SkullChick

New Member
But for those people who feel like they are not disabled, tell me the reason, and the 1 million dollar question is WHY on the earth are you receiving disability benefit, support and service if you claim that you can do anything then you should not get disability benefits, service and support and do what hearing people had to do to stay grounded in this real world by find job by themselves, pay taxes, house/apt bills, go to college with regular loan and scholarship, have only paycheck from job to pay for everything, medical bills, pay monthly for minimum health coverage and all stuff hearing people have since they are not disabled?
and discrimination are always there for hispanics, foreign speaker, black, gay/lesbian, all different things not just deaf but yet they still got job, have house, car and stuff how they do it? They simply work their butt off to get those stuff.
 

jillio

New Member
It's funny how we can bend the definitions of words to meet our needs. The concise definition of superior vs. the concise definition of disabled or handicapped. Personally I tend to adhere to definitions as described by the dictionaries. Many words have multiple definitions with some still evolving. I would have to go back to search but if I recall, Interperator (sp?) gave me a good answer on the topic of words and their definitions and how they evolve. I still say they are just words to describe something and to say disabled or handicapped is not (to me) a bad thing.
Well, disability is a noun, which means it is something one has, or one posseses. Disabled is an adjective, which means it is something one is. There is a big difference conceptually and contextually between the two.
As I said prior, one can have a disability without being disabled. And the ADA and the SSA both use the term "person with a disability", not "disabled person." The contextual meaning is different.
 

SkullChick

New Member
Skullchick,

You bring up some very good thoughts on the issue of hypocrisy among d/Deaf people who does not label themselves as diabled, but still recieve SDDI/SSI and free health care or whatever.

That is the purpose why I strongly believe that all able bodied d/Deaf people should be working as any other hearing people. I, myself, am working and I had to earn my health benfits from my job. If I don't, I can buy some sort of a health insurance, dental plans and such. As for CART/Interpreter... by ADA law which is under disabled... that's where I'm more silence on... I'd rather be able to understand and be understood and stand up that I have rights. I don't label myself disabled and I don't like hearing it, but I just go with the flow with ADA laws that gives us the rights for interpreters and such....

Am I a hypocrisy?
Since you're denying you have disability but receive disability support to get CART and interpreter to serve your need as disabled person because you don't have ability to hear teacher speaking.
I'm sorry to be blunt but yes you're hyprocrite for denying you have disablity and receive service.
 

jillio

New Member
Since you're denying you have disability but receive disability support to get CART and interpreter to serve your need as disabled person because you don't have ability to hear teacher speaking.
I'm sorry to be blunt but yes you're hyprocrite for denying you have disablity and receive service.
I don't see sleepytaz as being hypocrtical at all. He/she has said that he/she has a disability that requires accommodation, but that does not make one disabled.
 

SkullChick

New Member
Well, disability is a noun, which means it is something one has, or one posseses. Disabled is an adjective, which means it is something one is. There is a big difference conceptually and contextually between the two.
As I said prior, one can have a disability without being disabled. And the ADA and the SSA both use the term "person with a disability", not "disabled person." The contextual meaning is different.
Not able to hear is something deaf person has. Noun, check.
Don't have ability to hear is someone that's deaf. Adjective, check.

Person with disability= person with hearing impairment.

Disabled person= Deaf person.

Do I need say more?
 

sleepytaz

New Member
Since you're denying you have disability but receive disability support to get CART and interpreter to serve your need as disabled person because you don't have ability to hear teacher speaking.
I'm sorry to be blunt but yes you're hyprocrite for denying you have disablity and receive service.
Naw, don't be sorry :) My feelings weren't hurt... I didn't take it personally. Like you said, you had a one million dollars question to the WHY d/Deaf people do this or that. Good question. You do make good points though.

I don't mean to be denying that I have an disablity... I do as I can't hear... but I can't do nothing by it, actually. I don't like go out and proest about the correciton of terms. If a person rather to use hearing-impaired, disabled, deaf, and/or hard of hearing, so be it. :) Thanks.
 
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