How do deaf people learn to read?

Discussion in 'Our World, Our Culture' started by GradGrl913, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. GradGrl913

    GradGrl913 New Member

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    I have not been able to find research on how deaf people learn to read English. Some people have told me that they learn to read by learning whole words rather than decoding each letter like hearing people do, since they do not need to associate the letter with a sound. I would greatly appreciate any help on this or further direction!
     
  2. Boult

    Boult Active Member

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  3. Angel

    Angel ♥"Concrete Angel"♥ Premium Member

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    Not quite true, mostly all school have speech therapist in case children have delay in speech and language, this applies to all kind of children such as Deaf, hearing and hard of hearing...Speech therapist will spend time with your child to learn about her/his speech and language by saying the sounds of the word correctly by feeling the sounds that coming out of the speech therapist mouth, as when I had speech therapist at school most of my life, she would take my hand and put it close to her mouth and I could feel the sounds that coming from her mouth, then she would take my hand and put it near my mouth and feel the same sounds as I felt, then I learn how to be able to read words and say them correctly ,Really there's no different between hearing and deaf learning how to read, the only thing that is different is a hearing child could hear but with deaf children they need their hands to feel the sounds....
     
  4. Rose Immortal

    Rose Immortal New Member

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    I apologize if this sounds stupid, but what exactly is it that you recognize by touch that helps you know if you're getting the sounds right?
     
  5. Angel

    Angel ♥"Concrete Angel"♥ Premium Member

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    Please don't apologize, it's doesn't sound stupid nor is a stupid question either...It just like some deaf people can not hear music, in order to be able to hear the sounds of music, we feel and sense vibration from the ground or touching a solid object which will transmit the vibrations, with speech therapist to help recognize the sounds of letters by feeling the vibration, first what she would do is take my hand and touch her throat and she would say a letter for example such as " a ", then I will feel the sense vibration of the sound of the letter " a ", then she will take my hand and put it near her mouth to feel the " a " sounds that coming out of her mouth, then I try it by touching my throat with my hand and feel the vibration sound of the letter " a " , if it's not sound out correctly, we will repeating do it again until I get it right, touch helps feel and sense vibration of each letters once we are able to relized the sound of each letters then we are able to learn how to read and to say out the word correctly..... I hope this helps answering your question here... :aw:
     
  6. Rose Immortal

    Rose Immortal New Member

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    Thanks for being so kind!

    I always worry that out of ignorance, I'm going to ask something that will offend people without my meaning to. Or that I'll just sound like I have only half a brain. ;)

    I can't really tell much through vibrations about a sound other than where it's coming from. About the only reason that I've had to try that is to determine whether it's my next-door or downstairs neighbors who have their stereo up WAY too loud at 2 in the morning! (That way I don't report the wrong apartment and make enemies!)

    As I understand it, it's pitch that determines the way sound vibrations feel. Wouldn't an "a" said at one pitch be very different from one said in a higher or lower pitch? That's what I don't really understand.
     
  7. Angel

    Angel ♥"Concrete Angel"♥ Premium Member

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    You're welcome ;)...


    Higher or lower pitch are produced either in the form of a short or long sound, for example, there's the short A sound and a long A sound....when feeling the difference on the throat and then feeling that coming from the speech therapist's mouth. For the long A sound, the vibrations will last longer and would be a higher pitch than the short A sound, again the vibrations for the short A sound would be much shorter.... Learning and developing these variances has helped me to be able to recognize the differences in words. Maybe you could try it yourself and feel your own throat and notice the differences with the different pitches and vibrations and then you may understand this concept better... :aw:
     
  8. mattmgolf

    mattmgolf New Member

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    Just read, use dictionary, the better language will. I know it may be pain in the a$$ we are in a small world in the hearing world because English is the primary language so I highly recommend to read build your own character identity, then it will eventually get better. If you already know that please disregard.
     
  9. VamPyroX

    VamPyroX bloody phreak from hell

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    Umm... how do hearing people learn to read? I can't think of any different answer.
     
  10. Reba

    Reba Retired Terp Premium Member

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    The preferred way for hearing people to learn how to read is by using phonics. We learn the sounds of the individual letters and letter combinations, and then sound out the words out loud. That is also how we learn to spell.

    Some hearing kids were taught how to read using the "whole language" approach but that wasn't as successful. They would learn word lists, and try to figure out words from the context or using pictures. It depended a lot on memorizing lists of words instead of sounding them out.

    Some schools now use a combination of phonics and whole language.
     
  11. moonflower

    moonflower New Member

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    my mom taught me how to read and she was english teacher before i was born

    and my favorite teacher also taught me how to read too
     
  12. Rose Immortal

    Rose Immortal New Member

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    And then some of us are just quirky.

    I didn't learn to speak properly until I learned to read...I couldn't tell the difference between a question addressed to me, and the statement I was supposed to give in return, for instance. I also couldn't tell the difference between "he" and "she" and a lot of other stuff.

    Thankfully my mother was an early childhood education major, and recognized very early on that I needed some sort of intervention. So at 2 1/2, she started teaching me to read. For some reason, seeing sentences written down got everything through to me. To this day I still think in written words first, and only then does my mind read the sentence "aloud". I didn't understand this was unusual, when I was little...I couldn't understand why other children had trouble on spelling tests because all the teacher had to do was say the word and it appeared in my mind automatically upon hearing it, just like that. Taking a spelling test was almost like a copying exercise for me.

    I'm not sure why this was...my mom thinks it was my ADHD, that I simply did not pay attention to verbal communication for long enough times to get it. Maybe coupling the spoken word with the written word made the experience "demanding" enough of my mind that I was fully engaged with it? I don't know. I just know I'm weird. ;)
     
  13. loml

    loml New Member

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    Cueing for Literacy

    http://www.drf.org/hearing_health/archive/2005/spring05_cuedspeech.htm
     
  14. mrtn_cainuk

    mrtn_cainuk New Member

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    I do reads Shakepeare very much and I like Macbeth because it is full of murder and greed. I was learned to read properly when I was in an mainstream school many years ago. Well, I started it when I was 12 years old.
     
  15. Endymion

    Endymion New Member

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    Magic.

    Or do you want research papers? ;)
     
  16. deafdyke

    deafdyke Well-Known Member

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    That's b/c you're hearing......Sound is basicly just audiable vibration. It's weird....most of what I "hear" I feel....and I've been told I'm an awesome dancer b/c I'm a lot more sensetive to the beat, then hearing people are.
     
  17. jazzy

    jazzy New Member

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    Not work for me, feeling the sound to learn how to read. I use my eyes to learn to read.
     
  18. Angel

    Angel ♥"Concrete Angel"♥ Premium Member

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    I don't believe you read my post clearly, but my question is to you is how are you able to hear the sounds of each letter to be able to produce the entire word when you are learning how to read?....If you just use your eyes to read, then how do you really know you're saying the word correctly? most hearing kids use their ears to hear the sounds, do you hear the sounds that comes out of your parent's mouth, teacher? or using phonics? to hear you recognize the sounds of each letter or words?


    Kids dont just look at the word and just guess, they need to recognize the sounds of the letter by being able to produce the words out correctly then they are able to read

    My little one is in kindergarten, we are to teach him the sounds of each letter in order for him to recognize on how to produce the entire word correctly, for example if one of the word say " fish " he will have to recognize the " f " sound and be able to try to say the word " fish " by reading each letter and knowing the sound of them by being able to produce the entire word in order to be able to read that's how kids read, not just by looking at the word otherwise the kids will have a diffcult time learning how to read ....


    My little one is starting to recognize the sounds of each letter, sometimes he having diffcult time saying the entire word all together, but he will in time once he recognize every sounds of each letter, then he would be able to read the words in the book without feeling frustrated, sounds do help children be able to produce the word correctly without having to guess it....At my son's school they are using phonics and it does help them develop their reading skills... .
     
  19. Rose Immortal

    Rose Immortal New Member

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    Tried that little experiment.

    I caught what you meant about the duration of the sound. Interestingly enough until that I hadn't believed my English teachers who said there actually was a difference in duration between long and short vowels!

    Then I tried the Spanish "e" and the German "ae", and that threw me off again. ;)
     
  20. IceCream

    IceCream Guest

    I learned to read with one person teaching me alone. I guess pretty much like with phonics.

    No, you're not weird. I was the same way. I couldn't understand why in the world teachers gave kindergarten spelling tests, but it wasn't kindergarten spelling tests to the hearing students. It was a bore when teachers would review the grades and spellings afterwards.
     

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