Hoh

Vorsia

Active Member
No I don't have hearing aids. I have 30db nerve loss in both ears. The speech problem has just come up within the last 2 weeks. Everyone says I'm mumbling or my words arent being said right
Also i was thinking maybe you should contact a Neurologist as well you never know , i have Myasthenia gravis it make my voice sound worse then it already is sometimes so check it out what else might be going on...
 

notunderstood

New Member
I am going to the audiologist instead I dont like my ENT anyways, and then so I dont have to get referred and dont waste any more time. I need my speech to get better, I work with the public. Bad speech=no job
 

Banjo

Expelled
Premium Member
First, you want to get checked out by a Doctor not an audiologist and have a hearing test done at the hospital. Second, you want to look into what hearing aids you can afford and what the best aids are. Finally, you want to look into other devices to go with the hearing aid such as FM system to listen at meetings and your ipod, etc.

You'll be OK.
He already has a hearing loss. He should be seeing an audiologist, not an ENT. An ENT is only qualified to deal with medical conditions like middle ear infections and surgeries.
 

Vorsia

Active Member
Notunderstood
You might have this Meniere's disease a. Excessive fluid buildup in the inner ear can cause sudden vertigo, fluctuating hearing loss, and buzzing, ringing or a feeling of fullness in the ear. you might have this you should of told this to ENT that you have balance problems any how you should get hearing aids that's also a mild loss you have , you need to hear at work to so you should go back to ENT for more test .. Do you have any of these Symptoms, listed above ..And go back to audio for aids..
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Hearing loss is constant, ringing yes like all the time, and dizziness/ off balance every now and then
But you can get that from lots of things. Breast cancer that metastasizes to the ear cause exactly those symptoms.

Always a good idea to have a good check from a physician when a group of symptoms cluster together.
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
He already has a hearing loss. He should be seeing an audiologist, not an ENT. An ENT is only qualified to deal with medical conditions like middle ear infections and surgeries.

Audiologist work for their hearing aid suppliers, not everyone needs a Miracle Ear, they get paid according to what they sell.
 

drphil

Active Member
notunderstood: As I understand the matter-ENT doctors don't do hearing tests-audiologist do. If the Audi finds various "troubles in your ears" will refer you to ENT doctor. You have have already mentioned having Sensorineural Hearing loss at 30 decibels which is only "mild loss" category.
Whether you need/require a Hearing aid can only be determined from your Audiogram- first step to determine what solution is required for you.
Good luck in getting relevant answers for you in the near future.
 

notunderstood

New Member
My current dr is an ENT but I got a hearing test done, so I don't know what they did, I just know what kind of hearing loss I have.
 

Banjo

Expelled
Premium Member
Audiologist work for their hearing aid suppliers, not everyone needs a Miracle Ear, they get paid according to what they sell.
Here's a shocker. All doctors make money off their patients one way or another.

In Canada, you must hold at least a Masters of Science in order to practice audiology. In the states, it's the Doctor of Audiology.

ENT Specialists and audiologists do not perform the same tasks and are not in the same professional field. You might as well get a proctologist to look at your feet if you feel it doesn't make much of a difference.
 

kellycat

New Member
As for speech degrading, it is logical. (Hearing) People constantly get reinforcement of their speech patterns and pronunciation based on what they hear around them. That is why people who move to a different area often pick up a bit of an accent. It's hard not to with all the constant reinforcement of the accent in the new area. BUT, people also tend to have language patterns of the old place stuck in their brains. So my aunt who moved halfway across the country as a young adult gets asked by everyone out there "Where are you from?" but when she comes home, people she meets ask her "Where are you from?"

The younger you are when this happens, the stronger the influence of the new accent because your pattern/habit isn't ingrained as much.

So when what you begin to hear is garbled or muffled by hearing loss, THAT is the reinforcement you get as to language, so your own speech will start to move toward that "accent" that you hear. Maybe not ever be as unclear or identical to what you hear, because you spent a lot of time hearing your "normal" accent, but it will influence your speech. If you totally lose your hearing, and begin to get zero reinforcement, you will gradually begin to mis-pronounce things, and not really notice it.
 
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