Hiya!

TheEpicFiend

New Member
I go by Fiend, and I'm hearing.
Perhaps my interest in the deaf community stems from my own sensory issues, the most prominent of which being my complete inability to smell.
I've seen the posts on here about 'annoying things hearing people do' and you could honestly switch out 'hearing' with any other sense word and it would likely still apply to the person with said disability.
If I had a nickel for every time someone shoved something in my face or said I 'just wasn't trying hard enough' to smell...
Anyway, more to the point.
I've always wanted to learn ASL, I'd just never gotten around to it. I don't have any deaf relatives or anything, I just wanted to know in case I ran into a deaf person. It probably stems from my sensory issues, I want to be prepared to be as accommodating as possible to anyone I meet.
Honestly, until I started learning, I'd never even thought about people who were hard of hearing. I'm a bit guilty of thinking in extremes. Do people shout at you often, hard of hearing folks? Just wondering.
I've only been learning ASL for four days now, but I'm picking it up pretty fast. One of my friends who's fluent is teaching me, and I'll reference the internet when she's not around. It's actually kind of fun, in a way. I also like the idea that if I get accustomed to signing instead of flapping my arms around randomly, people would actually be able to understand me. I find that really cool.
I'm still not quite there on the proper terminology, though... what's the difference between Deaf and deaf? I've noticed a distinction. Could someone clarify, please?
 
Well Fiend, :welcome: to AllDeaf! I am hearing as well. You seem like an interesting person, and I look forward to more posts from you in the future. :)
 

oompa2003

New Member
I'm hard of hearing and i've never had someone yell at me when talking to me besides when i can't hear them and they yell at me to get someone else who understands english. how that has to do with me not being able to hear them i have yet to figure out.
 

Bebonang

Active Member
I go by Fiend, and I'm hearing.
Perhaps my interest in the deaf community stems from my own sensory issues, the most prominent of which being my complete inability to smell.
I've seen the posts on here about 'annoying things hearing people do' and you could honestly switch out 'hearing' with any other sense word and it would likely still apply to the person with said disability.
If I had a nickel for every time someone shoved something in my face or said I 'just wasn't trying hard enough' to smell...
Anyway, more to the point.
I've always wanted to learn ASL, I'd just never gotten around to it. I don't have any deaf relatives or anything, I just wanted to know in case I ran into a deaf person. It probably stems from my sensory issues, I want to be prepared to be as accommodating as possible to anyone I meet.
Honestly, until I started learning, I'd never even thought about people who were hard of hearing. I'm a bit guilty of thinking in extremes. Do people shout at you often, hard of hearing folks? Just wondering.
I've only been learning ASL for four days now, but I'm picking it up pretty fast. One of my friends who's fluent is teaching me, and I'll reference the internet when she's not around. It's actually kind of fun, in a way. I also like the idea that if I get accustomed to signing instead of flapping my arms around randomly, people would actually be able to understand me. I find that really cool.
I'm still not quite there on the proper terminology, though... what's the difference between Deaf and deaf? I've noticed a distinction. Could someone clarify, please?

:welcome: to AllDeaf forum. The small letter for d as deaf is a medical term to label us as not being able to hear at all like severe to profound or totally deaf. The capital D for Deaf is a deaf person who can sign ASL and is in the Deaf community and the Deaf Culture. Most of us, Deafies, are more comfortable being with the Deaf community or be involved in the Deaf events to sign and not have to speak with voice on. Voice off is a must when you are in the Deaf events or in the Deaf community. We have some hard of hearing who can sign with us. Most of the hard of hearing are forced to be in the mainstream schools for oralism. Ugh! I was one of them but I was not hard of hearing back then but the hearing authorities at the mainstream schools thought I am hard of hearing which I was not at all. I was very frustrated trying to understand in the classrooms. They never listen to my plea for me to go to the Deaf school. **sigh**
 

TheEpicFiend

New Member
:welcome: to AllDeaf forum. The small letter for d as deaf is a medical term to label us as not being able to hear at all like severe to profound or totally deaf. The capital D for Deaf is a deaf person who can sign ASL and is in the Deaf community and the Deaf Culture. Most of us, Deafies, are more comfortable being with the Deaf community or be involved in the Deaf events to sign and not have to speak with voice on. Voice off is a must when you are in the Deaf events or in the Deaf community. We have some hard of hearing who can sign with us. Most of the hard of hearing are forced to be in the mainstream schools for oralism. Ugh! I was one of them but I was not hard of hearing back then but the hearing authorities at the mainstream schools thought I am hard of hearing which I was not at all. I was very frustrated trying to understand in the classrooms. They never listen to my plea for me to go to the Deaf school. **sigh**
Thanks to all for the welcomes!
Also, thanks for clearing that up. I'll do my best to use the proper terms.
 
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