Help me understand

EmmyJ

New Member
Hi All,
I am a teacher's aide in a second grade classroom. We will have a new student joining our class soon and this student is deaf. I hate to admit, but I do not have much knowledge about the deaf community. Please excuse my ignorance. The head teacher will be doing the academic planning for this student, but I want to help him feel comfortable and included socially. It would really be helpful if others could share how this student may be feeling. I know like any new student he will be very nervous starting at a new school. I would love advice on how I can help, but I really want to understand how this student may be feeling and why. Thank you all in advance for any insight and advice!

* Note: He uses ASL and will have an interpreter in the class.
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
Does he speak with his hearing aids or cochear implant? I urge you and your teacher to sign up for ASL class. Learn ABC signs first. Encourage his peers to learn ASL, too, so he doesn't feel too isolated. Is he only one deaf in the entire classroom?
 

EmmyJ

New Member
I think they are working on getting him a cochlear implant, but I am not sure if he currently has hearing aids. We are all working on our ASL. Anything else that may make him feel included and comfortable. I read somewhere to put the desks in a U shape so he can see everyone when they are talking. Yes, he is the only deaf student in the class.
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
I think they are working on getting him a cochlear implant, but I am not sure if he currently has hearing aids. We are all working on our ASL. Anything else that may make him feel included and comfortable. I read somewhere to put the desks in a U shape so he can see everyone when they are talking. Yes, he is the only deaf student in the class.
It may be difficult since he is the only deaf in the class. I used to be in similar situations like that. Use tons of visual aids. TONS of them. Sign all the time. Yep, set up desks in a U shape. I had classrooms like that when I was a kid. We were able to see each other while we communicated with ASL. I am not sure how much your son can read lips, but actually, reading lips can cause fatigue. That's what happened to me. I used to fall asleep when I came home after school because I was concentrating so much and I had no interpreter the whole time. There was a UK study proving that deaf children tend to be tired when reading lips too long. I am curious. Why isn't your deaf student in mainstream program? Does your school not offer it?

EDIT: one more thing. Either you or your teacher writes on the chalkboard or whiteboard, do not talk while he can't see you. When you finish writing on the board, you turn around, and make sure he can see you first. If he tends to tune out, you have to draw his attention with a wave politely.
 
Last edited:

Old Analog

Active Member
Great that your all working on your ASL and yes circle up the wagons, good point no talking with your back turned, questions what's home life, parents deaf, siblings, does he sign, and to what degree, does he have speech, second grade read write? You've got a lot of home work, now get after it,great your reaching out cause you don't know what you don't know:angel:
 

Old Analog

Active Member
I should ask do parents sign probably learning or resisting if implant is in the works, there good you-tube how the deaf brain works a must see for you, late now I see if I can find tomorrow, share love :applause:
 

Old Analog

Active Member
I know two deaf parents had a hearing child, the mother was disappointed, my friend couldn't understand why, you have to be deaf to understand, so why would two hearing parents be disappointed if there child was deaf?
 

Old Analog

Active Member
YouTube, how brains develop, how deafness affects it, what is needed, brain science part 1, ERCOD videos - how brains develop how deafness affects it, what is needed, impact of deafness ERCOD videos, two videos must see for parents and teachers of deaf children:deaf:
 

EmmyJ

New Member
It may be difficult since he is the only deaf in the class. I used to be in similar situations like that. Use tons of visual aids. TONS of them. Sign all the time. Yep, set up desks in a U shape. I had classrooms like that when I was a kid. We were able to see each other while we communicated with ASL. I am not sure how much your son can read lips, but actually, reading lips can cause fatigue. That's what happened to me. I used to fall asleep when I came home after school because I was concentrating so much and I had no interpreter the whole time. There was a UK study proving that deaf children tend to be tired when reading lips too long. I am curious. Why isn't your deaf student in mainstream program? Does your school not offer it?

EDIT: one more thing. Either you or your teacher writes on the chalkboard or whiteboard, do not talk while he can't see you. When you finish writing on the board, you turn around, and make sure he can see you first. If he tends to tune out, you have to draw his attention with a wave politely.
Thank you so much for your feed back! Since I am only the teacher's aide not the teacher I do not know much information about him yet. I just want to get prepared!
 

EmmyJ

New Member
YouTube, how brains develop, how deafness affects it, what is needed, brain science part 1, ERCOD videos - how brains develop how deafness affects it, what is needed, impact of deafness ERCOD videos, two videos must see for parents and teachers of deaf children:deaf:
Thank you I will watch that! I do not know much information about the student yet. He signs but his parents do not (or at least not well).
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
Thank you so much for your feed back! Since I am only the teacher's aide not the teacher I do not know much information about him yet. I just want to get prepared!
I don't know why I did say "your son" instead of your student. I am so sleep depraved! LOL My apoglizes.

If a teacher asks the class to write down a note while a teacher gives a talk, it may be hard for him to write down a note while watch an interpreter at the same time. Either your classmate or you write for him. It'd be helpful. In college, I had notetaking because I had to watch an interpreter.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
Are there other dhh kids in the school? Not sure of his background but one thing that is REALLY important is the dhh specific social development, not just interaction with hearing kids. He needs to know that he's not the only dhh kid in the world.
 

Old Analog

Active Member
On home page scroll down to our world our culture click on, scroll down to it's up for debate, jillio has some good commentary, you can louse yourself in that place and find answers to questions you never thought of:gossip:
 
Top