Hearing Massage Therapist would like to give relaxation music to deaf clients, ideas?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by mobileboost, Feb 13, 2013.

  1. mobileboost

    mobileboost New Member

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    Hello, I'm new here and one of my deaf friends recommended I ask something here. I'm a licensed Massage Therapist and I live in Delavan, WI. There are a number of deaf who live in this area since the WI school for the deaf is here.

    What type of music/sound waves do deaf find relaxing?

    This is my idea. I've searched all over google and I haven't found anything yet. I'd like deaf to have the same experience as hearing people do when they come to see me. Hearing people get to listen to relaxation music or whatever music they find enjoyable. It could be slow and relaxing or upbeat and fast.

    My idea is to have a subwoofer positioned under the table so the vibrations would go towards the person on the table over it. I'd also need to get music that would incorporate this as services such as Pandora don't seem to offer this that I've found.

    Is my idea possible? If so, I'm open to all possible advice or ideas of how to do this. I understand speakers, amplifiers, and personally enjoy the most amount of the sound as possible.

    If you're had a massage before, can you please tell me what you thought of the the music they had playing (if you could hear any or parts of it). My friend told me working on the low frequencies would be better which would be more expensive larger speakers. My understanding is I would agree with him on that for most, but I don't know.

    :wave:

    This looks like a great forum. I could probably learn many things here.
     
  2. dereksbicycles

    dereksbicycles Active Member

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    I just want massage. Thank you very much. Music be damned!!
     
  3. Sheri1000

    Sheri1000 New Member

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    What type of music/sound waves do deaf find relaxing?

    I understand what you're trying to do and it's fabulous. But it's also a bit funny because you ask, "What type of music/sound waves do deaf find relaxing?" Going from HoH to deaf means music is meaningless to me.

    My partner just walked by and I told her about your question (sorry, but I was laughing when I read it). She was a massage therapist but now does other holistic-related work. She told me my first response should be, "Duh." But I said it isn't because you're trying to do a good thing. She's hearing and said vibrations are stimulating and that's not what you're trying to accomplish - stimulate a person with a soothing massage :) . I agree. I want to zone out on a table and just be able to tell someone if their touch is okay or not.

    I do suggest you find an effective way in which to communicate if you cater to the deaf by using sign language, a pad of paper or laptop to type questions ...

    Best of luck to you.
     
  4. Royale

    Royale Active Member

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    Turn up bass high and it will help us feel vibration from music.
     
  5. Anij

    Anij Well-Known Member

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    Honestly - skip the music ... go with nice lighting and (if the client wants) aromatherapy.

    For (most if not all) Hoh and Deaf listening is WORK. It's not "relaxing". Some of us DO listen to music - but it's "active" for us, not passive like it is for hearing people.

    If I'm going for a massage, or anything else where I want to be able to relax and "zone out" for that time about the last thing I want to try to deal with is "misc sound noise".

    If your Hoh or deaf clients want music - invite them to bring their own setup (meaning if they have a special way they listen to music connected to their CI or Hearing Aids. For example, I have a DAI (Direct Audio Input) cable I use for music.

    Seriously though ... just skip it.
     
  6. mobileboost

    mobileboost New Member

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    It could be sub only without higher tones.

    I'm enjoying the responses though :)

    I do have the lighting good and relaxing, I provide aromatherapy in the air, and aromatherapy gel, oil, and lotions. A heated table, blankets, and a relaxing atmosphere. I'm just trying to offer even more.... if it's possible.
     
  7. VacationGuy234

    VacationGuy234 Active Member

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    It's not a bad idea. It would be good to test it out first.

    Another thing that will put these types of patients at ease is if you don't get frustrated when they ask you to repeat something because they don't hear it. A friend of mine is taking massage and he was a little put off when I couldn't understand him when he asked if I wanted a bolster under my legs. Ask if they'd like you to write things down and look at them when you talk. This will put them at ease.
     
  8. Sheri1000

    Sheri1000 New Member

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    Everything we say here is valid. So, there are many different ways in which to reach out. While we were out walking just now, I envisioned potential clients at ENTs, hearing aid dealers, and audiologist offices. Then ask the folks what would be relaxing. (Some HoH can hear some high frequencies but with me, there used to be so much I didn't hear that I thought a restaurant was playing two different pieces of music with two different melodies.) Playing music (sub woofer and otherwise) gets real tricky when you're trying to use sound to help HoH and deaf people relax because our needs and desires are all different.

    Again, your intention is great. It would be curious if you can draw "us" folks in. I hope you'll stay in touch and let us know how things work out for you.
     
  9. mobileboost

    mobileboost New Member

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    I have a couple deaf friends who would love to be my guinea pigs to try it out if they get a massage out of it.

    I'm never annoyed by anyone with a disability or not unless they are purposely being rude. Even then, I let it pass and am always professional and nice to them. I never mind repeating things. I do have a pen and paper in my office and in the future would like to learn ASL. Maybe it's something I could do on the computer even (but that's a different topic) :)
     
  10. NitroHonda

    NitroHonda New Member

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    That's an awesome idea. I have to give you major props for your gusto. Baby steps first though...

    Try to learn some ASL FIRST and gain the ability to communicate with your customers... asking THEM what they would like for their experience. Being able to communicate with your customers would be viewed as much more welcome and relaxing than potentially imposing something on somebody. This could backfire on you if you try to put it on and ultimately end up stressing the person out. The whole point of going to a masseuse is to relax. Ease of communication is certainly very relaxing.

    Again... major props for the gusto.
     
  11. green427

    green427 Active Member

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    We have a deaf massage therapist on board here...let's let her chime in and see what she recommends.


    How about putting a TV on the floor and/or ceiling and showing slideshows of images or scenes that make us feel relaxed?
     
  12. green427

    green427 Active Member

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    Yeah!

    Bring me a beer, too!



    :D
     
  13. Sheri1000

    Sheri1000 New Member

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    Two things:
    1. Masseuse in the massage world has a negative and sexual implication. She's a massage therapist, not a masseuse.
    2. Slides of soothing images sounds great to me then hopefully it would lull me to close my eyes.
    3. DEAF MASSAGE THERAPIST - where for art thou?
    4. Learning ASL could take years :) . You just need a way to communicate. I always found it goofy that audiologists and hearing aid dealers had one way to communicate - speaking.
     
  14. dereksbicycles

    dereksbicycles Active Member

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    Yeah, Leinaukegal Reds is my favorite!!! Toast to that :)
     
  15. Bottesini

    Bottesini Old Deaf Ranter Premium Member

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    2 Ambrosia our member fits that qualification.

    4 ASl for basic communication can be learned fairly quickly if you apply yourself.
     
  16. Sheri1000

    Sheri1000 New Member

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    Hey, Bottesini:
    Thanks for the name of the massage therapist. Now we need to find her. I'm really curious how she does massage. Being deaf herself gets her there. It's really, really cool that she does this.

    I agree that "basic" ASL can be learned quickly as in basic signs. I had the brains to last in IT for 30++ years. My guess is you whizzes (wizards, too) who know ASL are a bit more right-brained than I am. I think through a lot and when learning ASL (as was pointed out by someone in our earlier thread) I have to squelch or smush that side of my brain that uses logic. It doesn't work well with ASL :) !
     
  17. NitroHonda

    NitroHonda New Member

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    As far as I understood... masseuse means a female massage therapist. I have never had any trouble using that word and I always request a masseuse as I am not very comfortable with the same sex. We have several Deaf masseuses here in Austin and no... they do not give it up.

    I will certainly ask them and maybe ambrosia and Mobileboost can chime in here on that. I'd hate to offend anybody.
     
  18. green427

    green427 Active Member

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    I haven't seen that word "masseuse" used for awhile now....now I know why.
     
  19. mobileboost

    mobileboost New Member

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    Actually I'm a male and I've been a massage therapist for over a year now :)

    My own office hasn't quite been open for a year yet. I'm finally getting the finishing touches on everything I want now. It's taken a long time and a lot of hard work.

    Learning some basic ASL sounds like a good idea for communication. I did think about having a flat screen tv on the walls displaying relaxing imagines and video, but decided that currently they stick out to far, I'd have cords hanging around, and they are quite expensive. I do like that idea though if I was made of money :lol:
     
  20. Deanne

    Deanne New Member

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    I would make up some index cards/sheets with the most common questions you need to ask, and make them into yes/no format. That way, if you have to ask us something, we don't need to come way out of zone to try to understand the question. I have no problem opening my eyes and nodding :) I'd skip the music.
     

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