Handicapped Parking Permits & Deaf people

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
Same here, DD and RR. Broadcasting for all to see would make me feel vulnerable in certain locations. We've talked about this topic before.
 

Rogus

Member
...As long as you stay IN the car and calm with info out or a card saying you're deaf...then no issues.
Whether you're deaf/Deaf/hearing, if stopped by the police, the best thing to do is to sit calmly with both hands on the steering wheel until they walk up and indicate they want you to do something such as roll down the window or give them your license and registration. It's not good to be reaching for something like your wallet or license before they can see what you're doing. They may think you're going for a weapon. If it's night the advice is to turn on your interior lights immediately upon being pulled over and then put your hands back on the wheel.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
Somewhere in this forum I think someone posted a video of Marlee Matlin explaining what to do when you interact with the police. There's a couple of others out there too. But Rogus is right. At the very least if you have a card explaining communication methods etc- have it in an easy spot to reach- and you can get it after police is at your window. Maybe a small card like size of driver license (as not all states would have indication if you're deaf on the DL).

I've been pulled over a couple of times, so far no issues- but still try to be careful...
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
I was pulled over for speeding. He let me go with warning because I was new in the area. I thought it was 40 speed zone, but he said it was 30. Curse tree for hiding the sign.

When I told him I was deaf, cop pointed a finger to his tag and his police logo, and let me know who he is. Everything was pretty peachy.
 

Cappy

Well-Known Member
I was pulled over for speeding.
I was pulled over. Stayed in my car with both hands on the wheel. Cop came up, I told her right away that I'm deaf. She started to finger spell everything, that my lisc plate tag expired. Oh..the .. slow finger spelling...how annoying..the agony!! I couldn't bear it! I asked if we could try lip reading. Worked out just fine. I got off with a warning.
 

Tetracyclone

Active Member
I was pulled over. Stayed in my car with both hands on the wheel. Cop came up, I told her right away that I'm deaf. She started to finger spell everything, that my lisc plate tag expired. Oh..the .. slow finger spelling...how annoying..the agony!! I couldn't bear it! I asked if we could try lip reading. Worked out just fine. I got off with a warning.
Still, she should get a point or 2 for effort.
 

rsusselj18

New Member
I know a few deaf people that have handicapped parking permits/license plates.

Their states provide them for deaf people.

I find it offensive to those that really need the parking space, especially those who are in wheelchairs. If you can walk, walk.

I've heard a multitude of ridiculous excuses that got me laughing. Heard everything from "deaf people can't hear burglars sneaking up on them" all the way to "deaf people have been suffering, need a break".

So, tell me, if you have HC plates, why do you think you need them if you are physically able to walk?
WRONG! I am DEAF from birth. I do wear a hearing aid and have a cochlear implant. And yes, I can WALK. But -- I cannot follow sounds, meaning I might hear some sounds but have NO IDEA where the sounds are coming from. I rarely can hear sounds that are coming from BEHIND me. So, If I have to park FURTHER away from my walking destination, such as a mall or plaza, etc -- I am in more danger -- I cannot hear cars behind me, I cannot hear a person walking behind me who might intend me hard - assault, robbery, rape, or worse. Parking further away can also mean parking in a darker area. When I have fewer visual clues to help me navigate on foot, my balance is affected - because relying solely on my ears to help me keep my balance is NOT good -- I cannot HEAR. Thus, DEAF and even HOH people DO deserve to be permitted to park in handicapped parking spots. Just because you cannot SEE my disability does not mean I am not disabled and not deserving of having my special needs accommodated.
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
WRONG! I am DEAF from birth. I do wear a hearing aid and have a cochlear implant. And yes, I can WALK. But -- I cannot follow sounds, meaning I might hear some sounds but have NO IDEA where the sounds are coming from. I rarely can hear sounds that are coming from BEHIND me. So, If I have to park FURTHER away from my walking destination, such as a mall or plaza, etc -- I am in more danger -- I cannot hear cars behind me, I cannot hear a person walking behind me who might intend me hard - assault, robbery, rape, or worse. Parking further away can also mean parking in a darker area. When I have fewer visual clues to help me navigate on foot, my balance is affected - because relying solely on my ears to help me keep my balance is NOT good -- I cannot HEAR. Thus, DEAF and even HOH people DO deserve to be permitted to park in handicapped parking spots. Just because you cannot SEE my disability does not mean I am not disabled and not deserving of having my special needs accommodated.
What's wrong with your eyes?
 

HOH Guy

New Member
I would suggest instead something like a yellow tag stating that the driver is Deaf or HOH, that way wherever you park drivers know to look out for you. Could be on the mirror like disability tags or on the license plates.
 

Bear

Well-Known Member
I have one because I have multiple health issues and all are invisible. I have to use a electric cart at the stores and I hate it because people see that I am also overweight and assume I use one because I am lazy. I have arthritis to begin with and somedays it is painful just to stand up much less walk. I also have lung issues which makes walking long distances very tiring and etc. Yes, I can still walk for short distances and people who see me get out of my car always look for that placard lol.
 

Bear

Well-Known Member
I would suggest instead something like a yellow tag stating that the driver is Deaf or HOH, that way wherever you park drivers know to look out for you. Could be on the mirror like disability tags or on the license plates.
Having something that pretty much lets others know that we are deaf puts us in greater danger because now they know we cannot hear them sneak up on us.
 

HOH Guy

New Member
I can't argue that. It has just been my experience that most of my issues in parking lots have been from rushing drivers that assumed I could hear them.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
I can't argue that. It has just been my experience that most of my issues in parking lots have been from rushing drivers that assumed I could hear them.
I doubt those kinds of drivers are thinking about your hearing or even about you. They're only interested in themselves when they drive like that.
 
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