Effing hate my "deaf accent"!!!

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
#41
No, no, no. This is horrible advice. Tucking yourself away in the "deaf world" is NOT the answer to your problems. I think speech therapy will help you a lot. I've seen deaf people get rid of their deaf accents as a result of speech therapy. It works.
Got a beef with many of us? I am a part of the Deaf world and I am not a monster with 5 eyes and horns growing out of my head. I work, own a house, pay taxes and etc so if you have a problem with the Deaf world, that's your issue not the others'.
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
#42
Uhm, don't assume that I'm hearing. I'm a deaf person who thinks that deaf people shouldn't isolate themselves from the "real world". I GET it. I have a deaf accent and I have a hard time understanding some people. I KNOW what it's like. I'm just trying to encourage the OP that s/he can improve his/her speech, that's all. I don't want to see another deaf person give up and retreat to a safe haven like Gallaudet/NTID/other deaf schools just because it's easier to be around other deaf people. I believe that deaf people should push themselves and try harder if they want to succeed in the real world.
Oh...my world isnt real? Thank you for the insight. I will inform my hubby that our marriage is a fraud and my children that they are fake.
 
#48
going off topic abit,before i went deaf i knew two deaf blokes one american the other ozzie they had deaf accent mix with american and the other man ozzi accent they born deaf never heard thing in life brought up no sign just shows the lips and face mucsle what they do
 
#49
I was hearing my whole life until May 2011. I have a deaf accent and am told this is due to not being able to hear my own voice.
Can you explain a little bit more about your inability to "hear your own voice"? I also have a deaf accent, am HoH in the profound category, but I can hear my voice when I talk. When I speak, I can feel the vibration in my head and also hear my voice.

Can you not hear your voice when you talk? So, all you feel is the vibration? Thank you for your explanation (and anyone else that wants to chime in).
 

Angel1989

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
#50
Can you explain a little bit more about your inability to "hear your own voice"? I also have a deaf accent, am HoH in the profound category, but I can hear my voice when I talk. When I speak, I can feel the vibration in my head and also hear my voice.

Can you not hear your voice when you talk? So, all you feel is the vibration? Thank you for your explanation (and anyone else that wants to chime in).[/

I am completely deaf and for me I can not hear my own voice at all.
 
#51
Try singing. I sang a lot before I became deaf and my speech is still good. I still sign to myself and for people close to me. But you have to feel your voice and singing will teach you to vary your voice. A simple do re me fa so la te do will do a lot. Play with it.

I agree on the singing. It does help. Here's a video of me attempting to sing bon jovis dead or alive-not the best but it keeps my voice in shape and gives me a chance to exercise it.

I'd say to try to sing actual songs. no matter how horrid you think you sound it will help. I sing better than I speak, not sure why but I just do. :P you can hear my deaf accent in the video in the beginning with me talking with my husband but you can skip to .41 to get to the actual song.

don't give up!
Video for alldeaf - YouTube
 
#52
Hello "strong",

1st off, you chose a good user name, the reason why I say that is because it must of took couragious and strong willed to standup and give your presentation, knowing how low you fealt and how self-consious you are about the sound of your speach due to your profound problems with your hearing. You should be proud of yourself for standing up and following through on your objective, maybe some of your class mates didn't fully understand what you were converse, you gave it your best shot you should be proud of that acheivement, that's all anyone can as of you.

If you feel some of your friends and classmates didn't appreciate your contribution and hard work then they are not worth knowing they can't see past their narrow mind set, which is a fault iin todays society and the way its run. Lack of support and understanding of HOH/D portion of todays society.

How are you getting on with your speach therapy, I wish you every success in your speach therapy, I know you will do well ! There are so many people out their who understand and want to help.

I also believe that learning ASL and continuing speach is the positive way forward.

Keep in-touch, all the best to you.

Kev
 

Valorrian

Active Member
#53
My thought exactly. NO AMOUNT of speech therapy is going to get rid of a deaf accent. Even post lingual people have deaf accents!
Is that true that post lingual deaf have deaf accents? That means someone that lost hearing later in life? I am 20 now and lost my hearing at 18 due to sickness. How do you get this accent? I've talked my whole life.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
#54
Is that true that post lingual deaf have deaf accents? That means someone that lost hearing later in life? I am 20 now and lost my hearing at 18 due to sickness. How do you get this accent? I've talked my whole life.
It is just a natural instance when you don’t hear all your vowels and constants as clearly anymore, and they start to “fade”. But it doesn’t happen to everyone. Some go on to speak as clearly as they always have. I know I have a deaf accent, but I’m prelingually deaf, so everything I say is “learned” speech. It isn’t perfect, but very well understood after years of speech therapy. If this is something that bothers you, you could work with a speech coach to help retain your speech skills.
 

seb

Well-Known Member
#56
A friend of mines son was born severely hard of hearing not completely deaf, did not get HA's until age four and always spoke with a "deaf accent." He had speech therapy while he went to school, but still sounded like he was deaf. Fast forward to his late 30's and he was diagnosed with oral cancer and lost a good portion of his tongue, portion of his jaw and his thyroid gland. When I heard about his surgery, all I could think was: he will be almost impossible to understand now. I didn't see him after that until his fathers memorial service five years later and was surprised at how well he was speaking, his speech was better than before his surgery and when I asked him about it he told me: "I have had more speech therapy post surgery than I ever had in the twelve years of school and this time it was intensive therapy." So don't give up, anything is possible.
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
#58
Agree with AlleyCat....

Am also prelingually deaf... many years of speech therapy from about age 2 to 12 (stopped after 5th grade actually...6th grade was just... I guess a required part of my education plan-long before IDEA, IEP etc). I have no idea if I have a deaf accent but suspect I do if a person at the restaurant across the street from where I stayed in Utah could not understand me and I think one other time recently. A mix between not being clear on some words/letters and too quiet (To me I don't sound quiet but then hearing aids = amplified a ton). But in general I'm very well understood to the point people many times accuse me of not being deaf or disbelieving it.
 

peekaboo

Well-Known Member
#59
i am deaf without my hearing aids and i will get you dont sound deaf but you do have a deaf accent. :hmm::dunno: whatever that means????? I know I have a deaf accent, i dont need a hearing person to tell me that. LOL!!!! :rofl::mrgreen: :rockon:
 

Valorrian

Active Member
#60
How do people react to your accents that don't know you? Do you use your voice all the time? I'm not sure I want to use my voice around strangers now. I don't want them to judge me.
 

Communication Software for Deaf Hard of Hearing - NexTalk

Top