Do you have a service dog for the deaf?

Discussion in 'Pets & Animals' started by Nita Thomas, Oct 1, 2017.

  1. Nita Thomas

    Nita Thomas Member

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    I am really interested in getting a service dog for myself. I have a high frequency deafness and sleep pretty soundly. Not hearing warning signals or my telephone is a problem. I also don't hear the doorbell ring if I am not in a certain distance from it.

    I want to know what the fees and requirements are. Do we pay for the vet bills too? Does this vary from state to state? What agencies help with this?
     
  2. AlleyCat

    AlleyCat Well-Known Member

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    There are a number of products you can buy for sleeping and doorbell, among other things. Harriscomm.com. As for a disability dog, yes, you would pay vet bills. I don't know if agencies that help with that, but maybe someone else here can answer that.
     
  3. MCB

    MCB Member

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    I have been told that since loyal dogs do this with little or no training, there is no help available. It is only available for those with little or no hearing, even with HA's. I would much rather have a dog for comfort than buy bed-shakers and flashing lights. I do have a specialized phone from Harris, and have viewed the other equipment. Need to order more batteries and Zephyr desiccant blocks.
     
  4. Nita Thomas

    Nita Thomas Member

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    I don't want products and I do love dogs so I was interested in the dog possibility.
     
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  5. Nita Thomas

    Nita Thomas Member

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    I feel the same way, why get a product when I can have a dog for companionship too. I don't want flashing lights or bed shakers at all. I appreciate the solitude and peace of my home, my concern is for sleep time mostly and a dog would alert me. Besides if I had flashing lights I would probably go into a panic mode before calming down and checking what the purpose was for.
     
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  6. Beowulf

    Beowulf Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    My SO has a service dog, and she tells me they are not free. You can expect to be thoroughly vetted (to see if you have a nice home, right temperament, etc.) and pay at least $500 for the dog. She says only four states train them, so you can imagine the costs and hassles their reps go through when they visit you.
     
  7. Nita Thomas

    Nita Thomas Member

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    That is a lot of money. Think I will just wait and get a dog on my own. Thanks for the info. Considering that some of the deaf are considered disabled that is a huge sum to pay for a dog, even though purebred dogs are very pricey. I probably wont get a purebred, my mutts were always good dogs.
     
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  8. Barbaro

    Barbaro Well-Known Member

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    Depends on a program. Some programs cover small vet fees, but you have to pay hefty bill in order to receive a dog. They have very strict rules like you take a dog with you anywhere and if you violate one of their rules, they will have to take your dog away.

    I haven't seen a friend in a while. She depends on her hearing dog for years. I heard she received her CI for the first time. I doubt she has to return her dog back to the program if she doesn't need it any longer.

    My client paid over a few thousands dollars to purchase pure Spanish Water dog directly from Spain. He had to fly there to pick him up. Very beautiful dog.
     
  9. Beowulf

    Beowulf Well-Known Member Premium Member

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    Yep. You need to be financially secure in order to get one.
    Sucks.
     
  10. Barbaro

    Barbaro Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I agree. A friend is married to her husband who is a doctor, so it won't be problem for her. She had beautiful dogs like miniature schnauzer and white greyhound.

    If I can get a dog, I may train a dog myself by watching YouTube videos. :P
     
  11. AlleyCat

    AlleyCat Well-Known Member

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    An alarm clock with vibrator costs about $70. A door bell ringer about the same. I have dogs and love them, and they bark like crazy when the doorbell goes off, and even when someone is pulling up in the driveway. So I don't need to spend a sheer fortune on vet bills just to have a disability dog when mine do the trick just fine. RME. High maintenance, anyone? One right here in this thread.
     
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  12. Barbaro

    Barbaro Well-Known Member

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    Long time ago, I paid $35 for Shake Awake- a travel alarm clock with vibrator. It was cheaper because I purchased it at Deaf convention in Long Beach. It is designed in 1997. I still use it.

    This is what I have:
    http://www.yourhearing.net/shakeawake.htm
     
  13. Lau2046

    Lau2046 Well-Known Member

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    You pay all the bills for the animal's care as every parent does be it four legged or two. It's expensive. I'd love a service dog but frankly not many people can swing the cost. I'd rather just get a dog that needs to be rescued. Service animal or not, they do make like easier.

    Laura
     
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  14. rockin'robin

    rockin'robin Well-Known Member

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    My Pomeranian works for me just fine...I trained her myself...LOL...She barks and growls, then licks my leg to alert me someone is at the door...I do have a door bell flasher, but if I'm in the bathroom my doggie is the one thing that alerts me. Sleeps with me too...and absolutely no one can touch or try to wake me up while I'm sleeping...LOL...My grandsons found that out the hard way.
     
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  15. Lau2046

    Lau2046 Well-Known Member

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    Another consideration is that you're not able to pick your dog. You essentially state your preference, a large or small dog, but the agency/center that provides the dog ultimately makes the decision on the specific dog you get. I understand it because not every dog is cut out to be a service dog but I'm partial to Goldens and German Shepards. The other drawback is that you're not allowed to have other pets: cats or dogs because it interferes with the animals ability to "concentrate." I personally find that theory to be garbage because I've owned dogs and cats at the same time. It's just not true. However, as I don't have the money, or the time to go to the training site, and I know which dog I prefer - getting a rescue dog is the best thing in the world. You get an animal that needs you, and also gives back.

    If you have the means, go for it, they're wonderful. For me, choosing a rescue dog is the route I prefer to go. It's true what they say, we don't pick our pets, they pick us.
     
  16. AnnieQuill

    AnnieQuill New Member

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    Service dogs cost an insane amount to train, and when you buy one, you are paying back a fraction of the price it took to train that dog. For the service dog to qualify as such, it has to do tasks that mitigate your disability. Service dogs are more work than the average pet, and you have to refresh training daily so they stay in practice. you are also obligated to take care of it, just like a normal dog. (note, comforting you does not count as a task under the law)
     

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