Deaf Unemployment Rate @ 72.5%...!!!

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
Did you know that the unemployment rate in the deaf community is over 70%?
Watch this video to see a special message from CSD's CEO Chris Soukup.
LIKE and SHARE this video with your friends if you're ready to end unemployment.
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https://www.facebook.com/ThisIsCSD/
 

DeafDucky

Well-Known Member
why would there be any difference ???
Guessing he means:

Deaf- those who are fully immersed in the Deaf Culture- went to deaf schools and use ASL

deaf- those who tend not to interact with others who know/use ASL, grew up mainstream, many are late-deafened and are more in the 'hearing world' than the deaf world.

:dunno: That's my take on it. There's a range in both groups where some wear/use HAs/CI and some don't; it's more to do with culture and how we deal with interacting with hearing people.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
why would there be any difference ???
That's easy. I would think that deaf would be more likely to be unemployed b/c they depend on VERY expensive hearing technology. In addition to the super high healthcare costs that even hearing people deal with, they are saddled with the ADDITIONAL high hearing healthcare needs, as they weren't given the tools to not depend on hearing technology.
 

femme Fatale

Official AD Nutcracker
The key is to use all methods at one's disposal to bridge any communication issues that may arise. Can't expect employers to know ASL or provide interpreters at their expense, but most are flexible to accomodate whatever methods are agreeable to all parties involved. I'll admit I still felt at a disadvantage with hearing people when I applied for an accountant position, passing my CPA exam allowed me to stand out more compared to other applicants. No, it's not a fair world, and I don't expect to be treated special either because I'm deaf. Just use a communication method that works to even the field.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
It's interesting. I'd like to know the difference in unemployment between Deaf and deaf.
From your past posts over the years, you are constantly hung up on the Deaf and deaf thing. You have very outdated beliefs that Deaf people are helpless, refuse HAs, CIs, and so on. I've told you before that I very much identify as a Deaf person because of my culture, my upbringing, my social circle, my fluent ASL skills, etc., yet you think I don't really belong as a Deaf person because I wear HAs.

Bottom line, whether I wear a HA or not, or identify as a Deaf or deaf person, has nothing to do with my employment. I obviously could not take on a job that had phone requirements given how much loss I have, but if I had significantly more hearing than I do, maybe I could, yet I could STILL call myself Deaf. My culture does not change my employment rate. The two do not go hand-in-hand.
 

Tousi

Well-Known Member
From your past posts over the years, you are constantly hung up on the Deaf and deaf thing. You have very outdated beliefs that Deaf people are helpless, refuse HAs, CIs, and so on. I've told you before that I very much identify as a Deaf person because of my culture, my upbringing, my social circle, my fluent ASL skills, etc., yet you think I don't really belong as a Deaf person because I wear HAs.

Bottom line, whether I wear a HA or not, or identify as a Deaf or deaf person, has nothing to do with my employment. I obviously could not take on a job that had phone requirements given how much loss I have, but if I had significantly more hearing than I do, maybe I could, yet I could STILL call myself Deaf. My culture does not change my employment rate. The two do not go hand-in-hand.
Be easier to think/believe that anyone with any amount of loss/cultural experience be D's and put an end to this stupid pigeon-holing.....
 

whatdidyousay!

Well-Known Member
That's easy. I would think that deaf would be more likely to be unemployed b/c they depend on VERY expensive hearing technology. In addition to the super high healthcare costs that even hearing people deal with, they are saddled with the ADDITIONAL high hearing healthcare needs, as they weren't given the tools to not depend on hearing technology.
"Originally Posted by VacationGuy234 View Post
It's interesting. I'd like to know the difference in unemployment between Deaf and deaf"

I was asking what would be the difference from Deaf and deaf person . I personally don't see that would be any difference .
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
Guessing he means:

Deaf- those who are fully immersed in the Deaf Culture- went to deaf schools and use ASL

deaf- those who tend not to interact with others who know/use ASL, grew up mainstream, many are late-deafened and are more in the 'hearing world' than the deaf world.

:dunno: That's my take on it. There's a range in both groups where some wear/use HAs/CI and some don't; it's more to do with culture and how we deal with interacting with hearing people.
Close, but there is interaction between deaf and Deaf through ASL. Not everyone who knows ASL considers themselves Deaf.

I'm guessing the difference also depends on location.
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
That's easy. I would think that deaf would be more likely to be unemployed b/c they depend on VERY expensive hearing technology. In addition to the super high healthcare costs that even hearing people deal with, they are saddled with the ADDITIONAL high hearing healthcare needs, as they weren't given the tools to not depend on hearing technology.
Considering that work does not cover hearing aid cost, I don't see the cost difference. In fact, I would think it cost more for an interpreter. And, in both cases I'm guessing there are tax write offs.
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
The key is to use all methods at one's disposal to bridge any communication issues that may arise. Can't expect employers to know ASL or provide interpreters at their expense, but most are flexible to accomodate whatever methods are agreeable to all parties involved. I'll admit I still felt at a disadvantage with hearing people when I applied for an accountant position, passing my CPA exam allowed me to stand out more compared to other applicants. No, it's not a fair world, and I don't expect to be treated special either because I'm deaf. Just use a communication method that works to even the field.
Wow. Impressive. :)
 

VacationGuy234

Active Member
"Originally Posted by VacationGuy234 View Post
It's interesting. I'd like to know the difference in unemployment between Deaf and deaf"

I was asking what would be the difference from Deaf and deaf person . I personally don't see that would be any difference .
I don't know if it is a difference between a deaf and a Deaf population. That's my question. The video seems to indicate it's a percentage of the Deaf Community. It doesn't say it's a percentage of deaf as a whole. I know a lot of deaf do not have high paying jobs, but I do not know the percentage of deaf unemployed as a whole.
 

mikemike

Member
maybe 70& of the Deaf are employed at deaf schools and deaf residential schools and deaf social services. paid for the taxpayers...
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
Considering that work does not cover hearing aid cost, I don't see the cost difference. In fact, I would think it cost more for an interpreter. And, in both cases I'm guessing there are tax write offs.
An interpreter isn't out of pocket. Hearing aids (unless you go through VR, and then only if you meet specific income requirments) ARE out of pocket.
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
The key is to use all methods at one's disposal to bridge any communication issues that may arise. Can't expect employers to know ASL or provide interpreters at their expense, but most are flexible to accomodate whatever methods are agreeable to all parties involved. I'll admit I still felt at a disadvantage with hearing people when I applied for an accountant position, passing my CPA exam allowed me to stand out more compared to other applicants. No, it's not a fair world, and I don't expect to be treated special either because I'm deaf. Just use a communication method that works to even the field.
EXACTLY! That's why growing up, ALL dhh kids should have the right to learn ASL, Cued Speech, and have speech training (and the overwhelming majority of kids in programs that use Sign, DO have a VERY hefty dose of speech and hearing interventions)
 

deafdyke

Well-Known Member
From your past posts over the years, you are constantly hung up on the Deaf and deaf thing. You have very outdated beliefs that Deaf people are helpless, refuse HAs, CIs, and so on. I've told you before that I very much identify as a Deaf person because of my culture, my upbringing, my social circle, my fluent ASL skills, etc., yet you think I don't really belong as a Deaf person because I wear HAs.

Bottom line, whether I wear a HA or not, or identify as a Deaf or deaf person, has nothing to do with my employment. I obviously could not take on a job that had phone requirements given how much loss I have, but if I had significantly more hearing than I do, maybe I could, yet I could STILL call myself Deaf. My culture does not change my employment rate. The two do not go hand-in-hand.
Yes! Many if not most Deaf people do have speech skills! And yes, AlleyCat, you are SO right! Just b/c a person is Deaf, it doesn't mean that they are "poorly educated" or so sheltered they don't have the abilty to function in the hearing world......I know Deaf people who work as engineers in the hearing world, I know Deaf people who were accepted to Yale, Princeton and other competitive colleges......and then I know people who were raised hearing impaired, and who are afraid to venture out in public without a hearing ear person, or who still have major issues with the difference between boycotted and boycotting.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
An interpreter isn't out of pocket. Hearing aids (unless you go through VR, and then only if you meet specific income requirments) ARE out of pocket.

I believe he was saying the employer does not pay for hearing aids but they do pay for interpreters. He was comparing the costs to the employers not the employee.
 

DeafNerdMommy

Well-Known Member
Yes! Many if not most Deaf people do have speech skills! And yes, AlleyCat, you are SO right! Just b/c a person is Deaf, it doesn't mean that they are "poorly educated" or so sheltered they don't have the abilty to function in the hearing world......I know Deaf people who work as engineers in the hearing world, I know Deaf people who were accepted to Yale, Princeton and other competitive colleges......and then I know people who were raised hearing impaired, and who are afraid to venture out in public without a hearing ear person, or who still have major issues with the difference between boycotted and boycotting.
I have meet many Deaf people who have amazing jobs, like you said. But I find it funny, I never thought about it but I am HoH and I can't enter the hearing world without a hearing buddy, or at least another hoh person like my husband.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using AllDeaf App mobile app
 

Tousi

Well-Known Member
I have meet many Deaf people who have amazing jobs, like you said. But I find it funny, I never thought about it but I am HoH and I can't enter the hearing world without a hearing buddy, or at least another hoh person like my husband.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using AllDeaf App mobile app
Not sure what you mean by that, exactly......
 
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