Deaf and Disabled in Politics

#1
Politics is which makes Policy, so it is not wise to boycott it stating dirty politics or whatever.
For the sake of deaf and other disabled people, we have to make interest in politics and work in welfare and development of deaf and other disabled people.

What are your views?
Are you in politics or have interest in politics.

We make neutral and logical debate/discussion.
 

Lysander

Well-Known Member
#2
Being involved in politics is extremely important. Especially for minorities. People with disabilities need to make sure that they are trying to get into office the people that will help them the best. If you don't advocate for yourself, no one else will. Except for those people who are allies to your cause. Many times there will never be someone who will believe the same things that you do. Sometimes you have to vote for the person who is closest to your ideas even though they might not be the perfect candidate for you. If anyone was upset by the changes that were being made to the ADA then they need to be concerned about who they are voting for. Because those are the people making those changes.
 
#3
While it is nice to be in politics. It is extremely difficult to be in a political office especially in the United States which racism is greatly fueled in every form. I did in the past had exploratory committee and no one was interested in me because they gave same results: "Having a Deaf person as a candidate will more than likely not win a political office" Why? There are only about 10 percent of the population who are Deaf and the Hearing people do not understand Deafness and sees it is a communication barrier. In political world, you must always hear everyone screaming and shouting in chambers like Congress, Senate on Capitol Hill. State legislative are the same way. With ASL, you are twice as slower than a Hearing person talking fast. You have few minutes on the floor and they may not give you that ADA rights on the floor as the general public. Remember that the Legislative Branch in Washington (DC) have different rights and they do not follow the letter of the law anyhow. Its called dirty politics.

You are better off maybe be a lobbyist with an interpreter and get a special pass and go in. But you must raise capital to be able to travel to Capitol Hill and knock on every door that belongs to politicians. And really have to stop politicians in the hall before they go in the chambers.

You can also become a lawyer to become a judge that you can literally overturn a law. Being on the SCOTUS is not easy. Only 9 Justice and only once every few years is open. Justice Kennedy is retiring and there is a nominee already chosen days ago. Only Appellate Court or Circuit Court you can really turn over but again, it is the appointment of the President of the United States to nominate. Again, not easy.

If you want to, go start a micro-state. That is, a tiny legalized country of your own but you must stake a flag and claim a disputed territory to become a dictator of your own. Again, not easy because you need countries to recognize your new country. Sealand is one example is trying to become a nation. They are called Micronation, not microstate (ie-Vatican, San Marino, etc).

Hope this help you to reconsider. Just sit back and relax. Best answer.
 
#4
While it is nice to be in politics. It is extremely difficult to be in a political office especially in the United States which racism is greatly fueled in every form. I did in the past had exploratory committee and no one was interested in me because they gave same results: "Having a Deaf person as a candidate will more than likely not win a political office" Why? There are only about 10 percent of the population who are Deaf and the Hearing people do not understand Deafness and sees it is a communication barrier. In political world, you must always hear everyone screaming and shouting in chambers like Congress, Senate on Capitol Hill. State legislative are the same way. With ASL, you are twice as slower than a Hearing person talking fast. You have few minutes on the floor and they may not give you that ADA rights on the floor as the general public. Remember that the Legislative Branch in Washington (DC) have different rights and they do not follow the letter of the law anyhow. Its called dirty politics.

You are better off maybe be a lobbyist with an interpreter and get a special pass and go in. But you must raise capital to be able to travel to Capitol Hill and knock on every door that belongs to politicians. And really have to stop politicians in the hall before they go in the chambers.

You can also become a lawyer to become a judge that you can literally overturn a law. Being on the SCOTUS is not easy. Only 9 Justice and only once every few years is open. Justice Kennedy is retiring and there is a nominee already chosen days ago. Only Appellate Court or Circuit Court you can really turn over but again, it is the appointment of the President of the United States to nominate. Again, not easy.

If you want to, go start a micro-state. That is, a tiny legalized country of your own but you must stake a flag and claim a disputed territory to become a dictator of your own. Again, not easy because you need countries to recognize your new country. Sealand is one example is trying to become a nation. They are called Micronation, not microstate (ie-Vatican, San Marino, etc).

Hope this help you to reconsider. Just sit back and relax. Best answer.
 
#5
Very valid points... when trying to work in a hearing world deafness and partial deafness is not a minor thing, it is a huge barrier, there is so much discrimination out there it is ridiculous but one person cannot knock that wall down. Choose your path carefully, thinking where you can stand out. Small towns may be better for political activities or government positions since they know you.
 

Bear

Well-Known Member
#6
While being deaf may be a barrier to working in politics, I would not let that stop me if that is what I wanted to do. Barriers are meant to be overcome and knocked down.
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
#7
Feel it's and would be extremely hard for a profound deaf person to be in Politics. Politicians are under a microscope, deaf or not...as Chris Haulmark has unfortunately found out...(running for a seat in Kansas)….Seriously, I don't think he has much of a chance...but...he's hanging in there.
 

Bear

Well-Known Member
#8
I may be extremely hard but the clue here is not to let it become a barrier and an excuse not to even try. We cannot have breakthroughs if we do not even try. We have to show people that yes we are deaf but it certainly doesn't mean we are dumb. We can do the job, it just means we have to do it a different way. If we want equal access, sadly, we are going to have to fight for it.
 

goodonya

Well-Known Member
#10
Fight smart and effectively. In training to do so learn from others who succeed at it and those who do not. Coaches and teachers play strong roles in a great support group. I encourage you to look into further action.
 
#12
There was a blind politician in the UK called David Blunket. He eventually went the way politicians do but he was capable of doing his job. So I don't see why a Deaf person couldn't go into politics.

Me, I just sign petitions. Lots of them. I also fund various animal right causes such as Speak, Viva and Sea Shepard.
 

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