Certification for Deaf/HOH service dog?

ncff07

Resident Punk Ass
Premium Member
Not sure if this is the right place but the thread description said public accomodations so here it is..

Was wondering where and how and if it would be possible to get my dog to be certified as a service dog for deaf/hoh? Shes a 3 year old collie and already alerts me to certain things if something isnt right. Hence loud noises or knocking she'll either wake me up or come and lay under my feet where ever im at. Would it be possible to get her certified as a service dog? What type of training or school would she have to go to if any at all? Just what and how do i need to do?
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
I believe you have to take ur dog to K9 training school, where they will evaluate ur dog first....then start the commands training, etc. You will have to be with ur dog also, and work with the instructor. Not sure how long the course is, but you would be able to get certification there as long as ur dog passed all the tests.

That's where I took my dog, "Sweetheart". But at the same time, they were encouraging me to purchase a German Shepard, which I did not want. They also train Police Dogs there.

My dog and I didn't finish the training, due to some unforeseen incident.

But would be a good idea to call K9 Cainine School, then perhaps they could direct you better.

I feel sure you can also go online and get better information.
 

pek1

New Member
Not sure if this is the right place but the thread description said public accomodations so here it is..

Was wondering where and how and if it would be possible to get my dog to be certified as a service dog for deaf/hoh? Shes a 3 year old collie and already alerts me to certain things if something isnt right. Hence loud noises or knocking she'll either wake me up or come and lay under my feet where ever im at. Would it be possible to get her certified as a service dog? What type of training or school would she have to go to if any at all? Just what and how do i need to do?
ncff07,

There are many, many threads about this. The first step to do is consult with the DOJ (Department of Justice) website regarding service dogs. Commonly Asked Questions About Service Animals in Places of Business

I have a hearing dog and under the ADA, there is no such thing as "certification." Do not go with a program unless you want to adhere to their rules, their rules and their rules. Understand my meaning? Feel free to pm me about this, I'll tell you all about Snickers. :)
 

deafaussie

New Member
Certification, there is NO SUCH A THING AS CERTIFICATIONS. ADA law states that no one are allowed to ask owner if the 'animal' is actually a trained service animal. You are obligated not to answer to their questions and refer them to read in ADA law.

I have my dog, American Pitbull Terrier and wears service animal vest at all times, bringing with me to shopping centers, toilets, restaurants and in public transportation.

Property managers in my community apartments where I life had actually banned specific type of breed due to their insurance purposes but ADA law trumped them all and they cant do anything,but to allow me to keep my dog. Usually, they charges $500 deposit and 50 dollars extra a month for pet. ADA law disallows that.

It is imperative to train your dog first.

Good luck
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
Certification, there is NO SUCH A THING AS CERTIFICATIONS. ADA law states that no one are allowed to ask owner if the 'animal' is actually a trained service animal. You are obligated not to answer to their questions and refer them to read in ADA law.

I have my dog, American Pitbull Terrier and wears service animal vest at all times, bringing with me to shopping centers, toilets, restaurants and in public transportation.

Property managers in my community apartments where I life had actually banned specific type of breed due to their insurance purposes but ADA law trumped them all and they cant do anything,but to allow me to keep my dog. Usually, they charges $500 deposit and 50 dollars extra a month for pet. ADA law disallows that.

It is imperative to train your dog first.

Good luck
WOW!....Good news there....3 questions:....where could I purchase the service animal vest?.....and 2nd....you said "it is imperative to train ur dog first"....so where is the best place for training>? and 3rd ....does this apply for ALL states in the USA?
 

deafaussie

New Member
WOW!....Good news there....3 questions:....where could I purchase the service animal vest?.....and 2nd....you said "it is imperative to train ur dog first"....so where is the best place for training>? and 3rd ....does this apply for ALL states in the USA?
Any dog trainer living near you. I took my then 4 month old puppy for one hour, one to one training session. this is to build foundation on how or what to train. Do and Don'ts. I took once a week for three months but it is my responsibility to train my dog everyday for about 15 minutes.

ADA law applies to all 50 states.

you can buy vest for your dog from www.sitstay.com but I advise you to wait until your dog is about 18 months old so you will know your dog will stop growing in size unless getting fatter or heavier.

Specific URL link to this vest, orange. Service Dog Vest, Orange - Dog Supplies Traditionally its for Deaf and HoH service dog.
 

DeafDoc1

New Member
Premium Member
Certification, there is NO SUCH A THING AS CERTIFICATIONS. ADA law states that no one are allowed to ask owner if the 'animal' is actually a trained service animal. You are obligated not to answer to their questions and refer them to read in ADA law.

It is imperative to train your dog first.

Good luck
That's not exactly what the ADA states. It states that the public places cannot ask for proof of disability, and since there are no certifications yet for service/hearing/guide dogs, they cannot demand proof of training. However, the dog must be well-mannered, behave appropriately in public places, and provide a needed service to alleviate a functional impairment.

2. Q: What is a service animal?


A: The ADA defines a service animal as any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. If they meet this definition, animals are considered service animals under the ADA regardless of whether they have been licensed or certified by a state or local government.


Service animals perform some of the functions and tasks that the individual with a disability cannot perform for him or herself. Guide dogs are one type of service animal, used by some individuals who are blind. This is the type of service animal with which most people are familiar. But there are service animals that assist persons with other kinds of disabilities in their day-to-day activities. Some examples include:


_ Alerting persons with hearing impairments to sounds.

_ Pulling wheelchairs or carrying and picking up things for persons with mobility impairments.

_ Assisting persons with mobility impairments with balance.

A service animal is not a pet.


3. Q: How can I tell if an animal is really a service animal and not just a pet?


A: Some, but not all, service animals wear special collars and harnesses. Some, but not all, are licensed or certified and have identification papers. If you are not certain that an animal is a service animal, you may ask the person who has the animal if it is a service animal required because of a disability. However, an individual who is going to a restaurant or theater is not likely to be carrying documentation of his or her medical condition or disability. Therefore, such documentation generally may not be required as a condition for providing service to an individual accompanied by a service animal. Although a number of states have programs to certify service animals, you may not insist on proof of state certification before permitting the service animal to accompany the person with a disability.


People can buy vests online and have their dog wear it, but if the dog misbehaves (sniffing others or store items, begs for food, barks, etc) the owner of the establishment has the right to refuse entry. Plus, those people who "cheat" and try to bring a non-trained "pet" claiming it's a service dog jeopardize the rights and priveleges of those of us with trained, well-behaved helpers.
 

pek1

New Member
That's not exactly what the ADA states. It states that the public places cannot ask for proof of disability and since there are no certifications (omit) for service/hearing/guide dogs, they cannot demand proof of training.
I omitted the word, "yet" because it is not part of the ADA and is in your words. In quoting law, one needs to refer exactly what the law says and not take away from it.

People can buy vests online and have their dog wear it, but if the dog misbehaves (sniffing others or store items, begs for food, barks, etc) the owner of the establishment has the right to refuse entry. Plus, those people who "cheat" and try to bring a non-trained "pet" claiming its a service dog jeopardize the rights and priveleges of those of us with trained, well-behaved helpers.[/QUOTE]

Misbehavior of a service animal would be much more severe than just sniffing. Not only is Snickers my hearing dog, but I trust her 100 percent if she smells something wrong. So, in your words, if a dog is trained to smell smoke, the animal would be banned.

Second, which is proper: its (example: its mother) or it's (it is)? You had the second one and I corrected it. Be sure how to write the proper possessive. As for the cheating people, a true service dog team most definately can turn them in to the police, thus getting the business off the hook for "being the bad guy" for doing it. I would do it in a heartbeat if I spotted a fake "service dog team."
 

DeafDoc1

New Member
Premium Member
I omitted the word, "yet" because it is not part of the ADA and is in your words. In quoting law, one needs to refer exactly what the law says and not take away from it.

People can buy vests online and have their dog wear it, but if the dog misbehaves (sniffing others or store items, begs for food, barks, etc) the owner of the establishment has the right to refuse entry. Plus, those people who "cheat" and try to bring a non-trained "pet" claiming its a service dog jeopardize the rights and priveleges of those of us with trained, well-behaved helpers.

Misbehavior of a service animal would be much more severe than just sniffing. Not only is Snickers my hearing dog, but I trust her 100 percent if she smells something wrong. So, in your words, if a dog is trained to smell smoke, the animal would be banned.

Second, which is proper: its (example: its mother) or it's (it is)? You had the second one and I corrected it. Be sure how to write the proper possessive. As for the cheating people, a true service dog team most definately can turn them in to the police, thus getting the business off the hook for "being the bad guy" for doing it. I would do it in a heartbeat if I spotted a fake "service dog team."
The reason I included "yet" is that with the blatant abuse of service dog vests and "companion" animal being passed as true service dogs, some organizations like ADI are advocating for standards to be set as minimal requirements, and with that the provision of certification for service animals. Not now, not yet, but soon. I did not quote law, I paraphrased it. Thus the lack of quotation marks or citation. IMHO.

As for sniffing, you will see in my statement that I referred to sniffing of others or items on store shelves. I said nothing about smoke. I stand by my statement, that the sniffing of others or of store shelves, and especially grocery store items, is inappropriate behavior for a service dog.

As for the missing apostrophe, I am after all human. However, I do know how to spell definitely.
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
I also firmly believe that people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.
We used to have a moderator named Chase, who was a retired English professor.

He had put a stop to Pek's tendency to make these nasty little corrections, but I guess Pek has forgotten that he is not the only one who can use the language. ;)
 

Dixie

Farting Snowflakes
Premium Member
Don't worry; in a few years I could become the English professor of All Deaf.com. :lol: For now, I am keeping my whip in my back pocket.
 

FireTiger

New Member
Why not apply for a completely trained hearing dog? I just turned in Jack (1L8) BL/M to Southeastern Guide (all post a picture link later in my intro) they specialize in guide dogs for the 3.7 million Americans who qualify for a guide dog due to VI/Blindness but their

Gifted Canines Program includes:
Hearing, Mobility, Seizure (not the proper term I think), Search and Rescue, Cadaver, Arson, Bomb Detection, Drug Detection, Anxiety, Therapy*,and other such dogs. (Therapy dogs are NOT granted Public Access under the ADA)

The dogs are always insured by Southeastern Guide (or whatever Service Dog school) until retirement so IF the dog ever did anything YOU would not be liable as long as you are following their rules (which for graduates are not bad at all)

You are in SE area of placement I think. The difference between how your collie currently helps you and a hearing dog is that they are trained specific behaviors for specific sound events.

Sirens behind you when driving, a smoke alarm, car horns - all have different specific responses.

I they have a website Southeastern Guide Dogs - Home but it omits information about the Gifted Canine Program... so I don't know how to get you more information on that.
 

MySolace

New Member
fake teams

I omitted the word, "yet" because it is not part of the ADA and is in your words. In quoting law, one needs to refer exactly what the law says and not take away from it.

People can buy vests online and have their dog wear it, but if the dog misbehaves (sniffing others or store items, begs for food, barks, etc) the owner of the establishment has the right to refuse entry. Plus, those people who "cheat" and try to bring a non-trained "pet" claiming its a service dog jeopardize the rights and priveleges of those of us with trained, well-behaved helpers.
Misbehavior of a service animal would be much more severe than just sniffing. Not only is Snickers my hearing dog, but I trust her 100 percent if she smells something wrong. So, in your words, if a dog is trained to smell smoke, the animal would be banned.

Second, which is proper: its (example: its mother) or it's (it is)? You had the second one and I corrected it. Be sure how to write the proper possessive. As for the cheating people, a true service dog team most definately can turn them in to the police, thus getting the business off the hook for "being the bad guy" for doing it. I would do it in a heartbeat if I spotted a fake "service dog team."
[/QUOTE]

All this is true, and should be. But people who are training their own dogs, do need practice. So someone like myself who is only beginning to train my dog, needs to go to public places to teach my dog what is expected of him.
 
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