career as an interpreter?

A

apathrev

Guest
For awhile I haven't been sure what I want to do for a career. I've been curious lately about a career as an interpreter. I'm not saying thats what I'm aiming for, but I am just curious as to the certification process, education, etc. Surely there are some terps who can help me with this question.
 

diehardbiker

Active Member
Would be nice add another terp in high demanding pool of terps! Actually the "Average" time for an terp to master the skill is 5 years. Remember I said AVeraGe, you could beat them by just 1 year, or struggling for 15 years and pah! I have few relationship with terps and I learn some of their cultures. It TAKES true passion to master the skill, or "Deafwannabe" or "CODAwannabe". Books and video is just alrighty... Best is go in deaf crowd and get bashed by them and if you can deal with them then YOU will be on the way to top of it in the end! Generally plenty of them would look down at you in the beginning. Just give them time to know your DAMN serious about this and have the desire to start from the first step of the stairs way to the top of the ladder. There is no such thing as crash course, or overnight stuff in terp skill development. It takes true passion and persistance.

cental34 said:
For awhile I haven't been sure what I want to do for a career. I've been curious lately about a career as an interpreter. I'm not saying thats what I'm aiming for, but I am just curious as to the certification process, education, etc. Surely there are some terps who can help me with this question.
 
A

apathrev

Guest
As of now, I'm having a hard time finding local organizations. But, hopefully, I can meet some people, locally soon. As far as career choice, I doubt I'd be able to handle being an interpreter. Like I said I was just expressing curiousity.
 

Margie

New Member
Its not easy getting an interperting job.

Interpreting jobs are very hard to get.
I do interpreting on the side.
If you really want full time job as an interpreter go to a local community colleage in your area and see if they have any deaf students there.
Good luck!
Margie
Dir. of Communication Services
OCDAC
 

NightwarriorJin

New Member
Margie said:
Interpreting jobs are very hard to get.
I do interpreting on the side.
If you really want full time job as an interpreter go to a local community colleage in your area and see if they have any deaf students there.
Good luck!
Margie
Dir. of Communication Services
OCDAC
I disagree that it is hard to get. Right now VRS are screaming for them, because of that, community are screaming for good interpreter since VRS got them. so bascially new technology created new jobs already.
 

diehardbiker

Active Member
I second that and it really depends on where you live. If your up here in Rochester, you won't have trouble finding terp jobs. They just open the Sorenson VRS center up here, so plenty of position available.

NightwarriorJin said:
I disagree that it is hard to get. Right now VRS are screaming for them, because of that, community are screaming for good interpreter since VRS got them. so bascially new technology created new jobs already.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
Educational terps in the public school systems. Pro: steady income and benefits, regular schedule and vacations, develope long-term relationships with students and staff. Con: little Deaf community interaction, too much routine, lower hourly pay scale than private terps, sometimes "collateral" duties (bus driving, admin, other non-terp) required, unclear job descriptions (terp only? terp/tutor?).

State agency work. Pro: steady income and benefits, mileage comp or state car use. Con: irregular schedule, collateral duties, restricted opportunities.

Private interpreter company. Pro: higher hourly wage, more community interaction, variety of assignments and clients, training support, service coordinator takes care of payroll and scheduling (terp just interprets; no admin hassles). Con: hours can be seasonal, schedules are irregular, and minimum benefits.

Private practice (used to be called "freelance"). Pro: make your own schedule, choose your own clients, keep all the fees, community interaction, and variety of assignments. Con: constantly seeking out clients, no team members or subs available, irregular hours and pay, no benefits, no training ops, responsible for all billing, collecting and taxes, and competing for contracts with larger agencies.

VRS terps is another catagory that others have more info about. I am not as familiar with their pros and cons. I do know some people love it (no commuting). Other terps prefer face-to-face interaction. It is just personal preference.

Each state and private agency has different terp requirements (certifications, quality ratings, etc.) Some school districts require terps to have additional educational qualifications. Depends on the area.

While a terp is going thru training, that is the time to start researching career ops. Talk to the terps in your area. Request observation time. I found the observation/mentor system very helpful. I contacted the local schools, state agencies, and private companies. I asked if I could observe their terps at work. No problem. Just expect that they will require you to sign a privacy statement, to keep the assignments confidential.

Most terps are very willing to help you. If they are not, that is a red flag about that particular agency.
 
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