Books on Deaf Culture as mentioned by AllDeaf users

dogmom

Well-Known Member
#21
here is another - Deafening, by Francis Itani
set in Canada around WW1
think it was based on the experiences of the author's grandmother..
 

jillio

New Member
#22
I ordered this from Amazon.com: Sounds Like Home: Growing Up Black and Deaf in the South by Mary Herring Wright.

The online previews looked interesting. I might order her sequel, Far from Home: Memories of World War II and Afterward later. This description sounds interesting:

"She’s got no more business there than a pig has with a Bible." That’s what her father said when Mary Herring announced that she would be moving to Washington, DC, in late1942. Recently graduated from the North Carolina School for Black Deaf and Blind Students, Mary had been invited to the nation’s capital by a cousin to see a specialist about her hearing loss. Though nothing could be done about her deafness, Mary quickly proved her father wrong by passing the civil service examination with high marks. Far From Home: Memories of World War II and Afterward, the second installment of her autobiography, describes her life from her move to Washington to the present.

Mary soon became a valued employee for the Navy, maintaining rosters for the many servicemen in war theaters worldwide. Her remarkable gift for detail depicts Washington in meticulous layers, a sleepy Southern town force-grown into a dynamic geopolitical hub. Life as a young woman amid the capital’s Black middle class could be warm and fun, filled with visits from family and friends, and trips home to Iron Mine for tearful, joyous reunions. But the reality of the times never far off. On many an idyllic afternoon, she and her friends found somber peace in Arlington Cemetery, next to the grave of the sole Unknown Soldier at that time. During an evening spent at the U.S.O., one hearing woman asked how people like her could dance, and Mary answered, "With our feet." She became a pen pal to several young servicemen, but did not want to know why some of them suddenly stopped writing.

Despite the close friends and good job that she had in Washington, the emotional toll caused Mary to return to her family home in Iron Mine, NC. There, she rejoined her family and resumed her country life. She married and raised four daughters, and recounts the joys and sorrows she experienced through the years, particularly the loss of her parents. Her blend of the gradual transformation of Southern rural life with momentous events such as Hurricane Hazel creates an extraordinary narrative history. The constant in Far from Home remains the steady confidence that Mary Herring Wright has in herself, making her new memoir a perfect companion to her first.
Got that one from the library several years ago. I found it to be very interesting in both a deaf cultural vein and a black cultural vein, not to mention the Southern cultural vein. This woman had a lot going on.
 

BecLak

Well-Known Member
#25
Wirelessly posted

Kristina, may i suggest you add all entries onto your master list then when people come to the sticky thread they have a book reference list right on the first page or more. They can they scroll through the thread for comments on the various books. That is if you haven't thought of this already. Thanks.
 

KristinaB

Emotional Mess
Premium Member
#26
Wirelessly posted

Kristina, may i suggest you add all entries onto your master list then when people come to the sticky thread they have a book reference list right on the first page or more. They can they scroll through the thread for comments on the various books. That is if you haven't thought of this already. Thanks.
I don't think I can continue to add to the first post or in this case, the 2nd post. Not sure how I could do that. I am updating my list on my computer, but you are right - It would be good if I could.
 
#33
Ok I don't know if someone has already mentioned this, but I didn't see it in the list there is also a book called Understanding Deaf Culture: In Search of Deafhood
 

KristinaB

Emotional Mess
Premium Member
#35
Wow Kristina, did you read all of these...some of the books I have. Probably about two or three of them and I skip in between books but have never made it to the end!
I did not read all of them. Only a few. This list was compiled from others here on AllDeaf mentioning them here there and everywhere. I did not do an exhaustive search of AllDeaf's database. Some came up during Google searches and other's were mentioned in other threads.
 
#36
Outsiders in a hearing world, it is an older work written about the time that ASL was starting to be recognised as a language in it's own right. If I recall correctly it is a bit of a dry read, as it is a Sociology study work. Still a good work, would be interesting to see a comparison study as this one has a published date of 1979.
 

dogmom

Well-Known Member
#38
Deaf Studies Talking

oh, and this one.... [ame]http://www.amazon.com/Eyes-Desire-Deaf-Lesbian-Reader/dp/1555832040[/ame] -Eyes of Desire; Deaf Gay and Lesbian Anthology.
I read that one in college, one of the first books about it I had.
 

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