Books on Deaf Culture as mentioned by AllDeaf users

KristinaB

Emotional Mess
Premium Member
#1
If we could have a moderator make this "sticky" I would appreciate it.

The following is a quick list I have put together taken from recent posts regarding Deaf Culture. A number of us here on AllDeaf feel that it would benefit most anyone. Deaf, Hard of Hearing, ASL students (both terps and just for the heck of it) and CI users whether they identify as deaf or hoh. Families of deaf or hoh would also benefit. If you can think of any that I have not listed, please feel free to add to the thread, but I want the main focus to be about Deaf Culture.
 

KristinaB

Emotional Mess
Premium Member
#2
For Hearing People Only: by Matthew S. Moore & Linda Levitan

On the Fence: by Mark Drolsbaugh

Journey Into a Deaf World: by Harlan Lane, Robert Hoffmeister and Ben Bahan

Train Go Sorry, Inside a Deaf World: by Leah Hager Cohen

Deaf in America, Voices from a culture: by Carol A Padden & Tom Humphreys

Seeing Voices: by Oliver Sacks

Learning to See, teaching ASL as a 2nd language: by Sherman Wilcox, Phyllis Perrin Wilcox

When the Mind Hears: by Harlan Lane

The Mask of Benevolence: by Harlan Lane

Deaf Culture Our Way: by Roy Holcomb, Samuel Holcomb and Thomas Holcomb

At Home Among Strangers: by Jerome Schein

Deaf Culture A to Z: by Walter Paul Kelley & Tony Landon McGregor
 

LDNanna

New Member
Premium Member
#4
Books and magazines are beneficial. I like a wide view. Perhaps a subscription to Sign News and Deaf Life?

Train Go Sorry is one that is on my night stand now. Good read.
 

jillio

New Member
#6
Books and magazines are beneficial. I like a wide view. Perhaps a subscription to Sign News and Deaf Life?

Train Go Sorry is one that is on my night stand now. Good read.
Excellent read, and from a 2 generation perspective. It shows how little things have really changed.
 

dogmom

Well-Known Member
#8
Train Go Sorry is one of my favorites ones-

am late on this but :ty:! Kristina for compiling the list and also to suggestions from people:)
 

KristinaB

Emotional Mess
Premium Member
#9
My pleasure. I am hoping to get some of these from my local library. A lot of them are not there and I will have to do a more thorough search.
 
#11
Here's a book I'm particularly fond of. Because I'm in it.

It's called "Silent Magic" and it's a book of biographies of Deaf magicians over the past 200 years. There are more of them then you might think.

Here's a link to it at Amazon:
[ame=http://www.amazon.com/Silent-Magic-Biographies-Magicians-Centuries/dp/1881099881]Amazon.com: Silent Magic: Biographies of Deaf Magicians in the United States from the 19th to 21st Centuries (9781881099888): Simon J. Carmel: Books[/ame]



Ron Jaxon
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
#19
I ordered this from Amazon.com: Sounds Like Home: Growing Up Black and Deaf in the South by Mary Herring Wright.

The online previews looked interesting. I might order her sequel, Far from Home: Memories of World War II and Afterward later. This description sounds interesting:

"She’s got no more business there than a pig has with a Bible." That’s what her father said when Mary Herring announced that she would be moving to Washington, DC, in late1942. Recently graduated from the North Carolina School for Black Deaf and Blind Students, Mary had been invited to the nation’s capital by a cousin to see a specialist about her hearing loss. Though nothing could be done about her deafness, Mary quickly proved her father wrong by passing the civil service examination with high marks. Far From Home: Memories of World War II and Afterward, the second installment of her autobiography, describes her life from her move to Washington to the present.

Mary soon became a valued employee for the Navy, maintaining rosters for the many servicemen in war theaters worldwide. Her remarkable gift for detail depicts Washington in meticulous layers, a sleepy Southern town force-grown into a dynamic geopolitical hub. Life as a young woman amid the capital’s Black middle class could be warm and fun, filled with visits from family and friends, and trips home to Iron Mine for tearful, joyous reunions. But the reality of the times never far off. On many an idyllic afternoon, she and her friends found somber peace in Arlington Cemetery, next to the grave of the sole Unknown Soldier at that time. During an evening spent at the U.S.O., one hearing woman asked how people like her could dance, and Mary answered, "With our feet." She became a pen pal to several young servicemen, but did not want to know why some of them suddenly stopped writing.

Despite the close friends and good job that she had in Washington, the emotional toll caused Mary to return to her family home in Iron Mine, NC. There, she rejoined her family and resumed her country life. She married and raised four daughters, and recounts the joys and sorrows she experienced through the years, particularly the loss of her parents. Her blend of the gradual transformation of Southern rural life with momentous events such as Hurricane Hazel creates an extraordinary narrative history. The constant in Far from Home remains the steady confidence that Mary Herring Wright has in herself, making her new memoir a perfect companion to her first.
 

Reba

Retired Terp
Premium Member
#20
I decided to go ahead and order the second book without waiting. There was only one used copy left, for $1, so I didn't want to lose the opportunity. (I bought the first one for 75 cents.) Shipping is $3.99 for each one; not bad.
 

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