ASL modifications for little people (or people with arm difficulties)

Glenn Green

New Member
Hi, I have a child patient with achondroplasia who needs to learn sign to communicate. His arms are short enough that he can't make typical signs. I can't find any books that have information for little people? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Similarly, what do people that cannot raise their arms well do?
 

Old Analog

Member
Greetings from old analog, I asked that question about amputees, was told two handed signs were signed as though the other arm was there, so I guess if the hands can't be brought together get as close as possible, if can't get to face same, if you get better advice let me know
 

Barbaro

Well-Known Member
Hi, I have a child patient with achondroplasia who needs to learn sign to communicate. His arms are short enough that he can't make typical signs. I can't find any books that have information for little people? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Similarly, what do people that cannot raise their arms well do?
He doesn't have to raise his arms if he can't. He can raise his wrists if he can. The facial expression and body language are a part of the sign language. Over my time, I met a few people with short arms and I can understand them. Yes, their signs are not perfect, but as long as their signs are articulate. I also know a very petite interpreter. She is 4'8" and her arms are short. She can't raise her arms all the way except moves her arms slightly. Most of the time, she can bend at elbow, and wrist. I have no problem understanding her. If there is any sign he can't do it physically, then he can do finger spelling or can find any way to sign what he can.
 
Top