Article : vocabulary growth in toddlers

neecy

New Member
I found this article on Digg.com (its originally from Why Toddlers' Vocabulary Grows Quickly )

Why Toddlers' Vocabulary Grows Quickly
Repetition, Challenging Words May Lead to Boom in Toddlers' Vocabulary
By Miranda Hitti
WebMD Medical News
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Aug. 3, 2007 -- Children's vocabulary often booms in the second year of life, and new research may show how that happens.

Bob McMurray, PhD, of the University of Iowa's psychology department tackled the topic of toddlers' talk. He didn't chat with kids or their parents. Instead, McMurray created a mathematical model to identify the factors that prompt kids' word spurts.

McMurray considered the 2,000 most frequently spoken words of the English language. The list includes easy words and more challenging ones.

McMurray theorizes that there's a tipping point at which children's vocabulary typically takes off.

According to McMurray, kids don't necessarily reach that tipping point by learning one word, then the next, and then another. Rather, it's a matter of learning a mix of words at once -- including simple and not-so-simple words -- and repeating them.

"Children are going to get that word spurt guaranteed, mathematically, as long as a couple of conditions hold," Murray says in a University of Iowa news release.

"They have to be learning more than one word at a time, and they must be learning a greater number of difficult or moderate words than easy ones," McMurray explains. "Using computer simulations and a mathematical analysis, I found that if those two conditions are true, you always get a vocabulary explosion."

McMurray's findings appear in an article in the journal Science.

SOURCES: McMurray, B. Science, Aug. 3, 2007; vol 317: p 631. News release, University of Iowa. News release, Science.
I think this would hold true that children implanted before the "tipping point" occurs would then develop a broader vocabulary than those implanted after.

Regardless its a fascinating peek inside the science of how language may be acquired.
 

jillio

New Member
Same vocab bursts hold true for sign language. It is correlated to developmental stages. Piaget, Erikson, and numerous other cognitive and developmental psychologists have already written extensively on the phenoema of vocab bursts in language acquisition. Nothing new here.

Can't draw generalized conclusions about applicability from an absrtact.
 

neecy

New Member
The reason its posted in the CI forum is we often speak here about language acquisition in children who are implanted young. Of course that's of no interest to you, but there are several parents of young-implanted children who might enjoy reading it.
 

jillio

New Member
The reason its posted in the CI forum is we often speak here about language acquisition in children who are implanted young. Of course that's of no interest to you, but there are several parents of young-implanted children who might enjoy reading it.
And they can't go to the sign language/oralism forum? That's where language acquisition issues are supposed to be discussed. Unless of course, the post directly refers to CI, which it doesn't.
 

neecy

New Member
Oh for heaven's sakes - can't you pass up a single post that I do without complaining?? GODS!!!
 

Cloggy

New Member
Thanks Neecy, good info....
After 3 weeks of vacation, AD is still the same....

Shouldn't this be in the sign language/ oral forum. Hasn't got anything todo with CI.
Nope, but your comment shows where you stand.
When I read "Children's vocabulary often booms in the second year of life, .." I have in mind "second year of life with sound...."... I guess it shows where I stand....

So this is an excellent place to put the topic.!
 

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
That just proves my point about providing both to deaf children at that age whether they have a CI or not. That's why I am against of putting children that age in an oral-only environment cuz at that age it is critical that children have FULL access to language and in the case of deaf children, a visual language should be used in the case the child doesn't pick up everything with spoken language. That's why I could never understand that so many object to using both approaches. That age is when language development is very important and sets the stage for later in life.

BTW...this article can apply to children who use sign language...their language in signing grows rapidily just like those who use spoken language.

There is no reason to deprive children of language but unfortunately many deaf children still are being deprived of language at this age. CIs may help but only if the child can process the sounds the way they r supposed to be processed...if not, then switching to sign language later on would only just delay them even further. I think that is wrong to play with their language development like that. Use both and later on if the child can have two languages to use. More opportunities for that child in the job market. Why not?

I don't see anything about CIs or HAs in this article. :confused:
 

DefLord

New Member
And they can't go to the sign language/oralism forum? That's where language acquisition issues are supposed to be discussed. Unless of course, the post directly refers to CI, which it doesn't.
Actually it is very revelant to the CI forums because we always discuss how language acquisition with CI can affect a child. Whether there are any pros or cons in waiting or having the child implanted earlier. So - I do find this revelant in the CI forum.
 

neecy

New Member
Actually it is very revelant to the CI forums because we always discuss how language acquisition with CI can affect a child. Whether there are any pros or cons in waiting or having the child implanted earlier. So - I do find this revelant in the CI forum.
Thank You!!!!!!! :ty:
 

Boult

Active Member
The reason its posted in the CI forum is we often speak here about language acquisition in children who are implanted young. Of course that's of no interest to you, but there are several parents of young-implanted children who might enjoy reading it.

and even those who were fitted with HA bilaterally at earlier ages like 16 months and enrolled into oral deaf education. (in my case)

in addition to this; (this somehow agree with the article you posted)
CUEDSPEECH.org > Viewpoints > Articles > The Dumbing Down of Languag

(I know it is a cued speech article but I refer to dumbing down of language)
hmm
 

rick48

New Member
The reason its posted in the CI forum is we often speak here about language acquisition in children who are implanted young. Of course that's of no interest to you, but there are several parents of young-implanted children who might enjoy reading it.
Neecy,
Good find and glad you posted it here. It is yet another factor for parents to consider when deciding whether to choose the implant for their child.
Rick
 

jillio

New Member
Thanks Neecy, good info....
After 3 weeks of vacation, AD is still the same....

Nope, but your comment shows where you stand.
When I read "Children's vocabulary often booms in the second year of life, .." I have in mind "second year of life with sound...."... I guess it shows where I stand....

So this is an excellent place to put the topic.!
We all already know where you stand, cloggy. And it still hasn't got anything to do with CI. Therefore, it belongs in the sign langauge/oralism forum as it is an essay on language development. I know you have trouble understanding the concept, but language development is quite a separate issue from implantation. To imply that they are the same is a very prejudiced, not to mention incorrect, attitude.
 

jillio

New Member
Actually it is very revelant to the CI forums because we always discuss how language acquisition with CI can affect a child. Whether there are any pros or cons in waiting or having the child implanted earlier. So - I do find this revelant in the CI forum.
However, this article refers only to language acquistion and not specifically to language acqusition in deaf children with CI. There is no mention of CI, or of the benefits of CI in language acquisition. It applies to signing children as well, or hearing children for that matter. And it does not discuss the issues of waiting or not to have a child implanted. To discuss that issue, you need to look at the studies regarding the language levels of children with CI in a longitudinal study. To post something that does not apply assumes that it is correlated, and gives the message simply from implication that this is the way any child with CI will develop language skills. Nothing could be further than the truth. It is exactly this process that allows hearing parents of deaf children to assume that their child will be able to develop comparable speech skills with those cited and with hearing children in general. I think we all agree that it is important for parents to get accurate and complete information, and not that which only points to benefits, or that which is improperly applied to a situation in order to imply greater benefit than has been proven.
 
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