Are deaf kids bullied/harrassed more frequently than hearing kids in mainstream?

shel90

Audist are not welcome
Premium Member
That's quite the story Kokonut. I think that is the key to it all- teaching students how to not only stand up for themselves, but how to physically defend themselves. All it takes is one incident like you and DeafBajaGal described, and people will know not to mess with the person.
Easier said than done. There was no way I could beat up the girl who was twice my size. Also, it wasnt in me to get physical with others.
 

AlleyCat

Well-Known Member
I got that line too. "Don't tattle-tale." WTF?!

"So... teacher, do you mean to say that the lesson for me to learn is to never challenge the bad guys? Never protest, never kick back? To always let people walk all over you? Wow, thanks for that lesson, teacher!" :mad:
I got that same crap too. After a while you just quit trying to get help.
 

CSign

New Member
Easier said than done. There was no way I could beat up the girl who was twice my size. Also, it wasnt in me to get physical with others.
I understand it's easier said than done- and yes it definitely would have been difficult to get into it with someone twice your size. Fighting isn't always the answer either. Sometimes it can help though, as we've seen. I think learning some sort of martial arts would be useful.
 

rebeccalj

New Member
Easier said than done. There was no way I could beat up the girl who was twice my size. Also, it wasnt in me to get physical with others.
Made more difficult when whole life growing up parents pound in head treat other with respect and how *you* want to be treated.:roll:
 

howag

New Member
I feel bad for the people who were bullied during their school years but i can't help but feel that times have changed? There aren't any deaf people in my 6th form but i like to think that if there were, nobody would make fun of them. But that's just me...
 

jillio

New Member
With all this said; would you consider this to be an extreme form of audism whether or not the bullies even know what audism is? Audism is defined as a belief that the hearing are better than the deaf, yes?

From my understanding, very few hearing people know what audism is.
Most audists don't recognize their audism, just as most racists don't recognize their own racism. That is what is so insidious, and leads to such denial instead of attempting to understand where their perspective is defective. What, I'm not an audist! And in their very denial and refusal to take a good hard look at their own attitudes and behaviors, not to mention the privilege accepted daily, insure that audism continues.
 

deafskeptic

Active Member
Premium Member
I feel bad for the people who were bullied during their school years but i can't help but feel that times have changed? There aren't any deaf people in my 6th form but i like to think that if there were, nobody would make fun of them. But that's just me...
Bulling has become a topic of concern for all students and their parents so I guarantee that you that deaf students prolly still face bullying in mainstream in the present.

I never was bullied by my hearing peers to the extent that others were but that doesn't mean that it doesn't happen to others.
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
I feel bad for the people who were bullied during their school years but i can't help but feel that times have changed? There aren't any deaf people in my 6th form but i like to think that if there were, nobody would make fun of them. But that's just me...
Wrong. Even as an older adult, people still stare at me when I go out in public. They also think as a person carrying a white cane that they can cheat me if I am alone.

A local restaurant tried twice to give me a chicken thigh dinner instead of the breast I asked for as they thought I would be unable to tell the difference. I don't go there anymore.

People who don't live as a different person don't have an opportunity to see the little things that happen to us everyday that eventually add up to a lot of anger and resentment.

And for anyone who wonders, my father taught me to fight back.
 

jillio

New Member
I feel bad for the people who were bullied during their school years but i can't help but feel that times have changed? There aren't any deaf people in my 6th form but i like to think that if there were, nobody would make fun of them. But that's just me...
Unfortunately, times have not changed.
 

sallylou

Potterhead and Janeite
Premium Member
There was as kid here whose parent told him to fight while both bully and target were together. The kid and his parent got arrested. Don't teach your kids to be violent.
 

deafskeptic

Active Member
Premium Member
Hell yeah! I still deal with prejudice and dumbassed hearies who think I'm not exactly bright b/c of my voice.
I deal with people who think the same thing for me except that it's my inablity to understand people as well as others via hearing rather than my voice.
 

AJWSmith

New Member
I came across this piece of research today that showed deaf/HoH kids who are mainstreamed suffer from greater attachment and individuation problems than deaf children in special programs. It shows (with usual scholarly qualifications) that there's something very damaging for deaf/HoH children raised in a mainstream educational environment - it negatively impacts on their self-esteem and ability to form close intimate relationships as adults. It also quotes another piece of research that shows mainstreamers suffer far more anxiety than deaf children bought up in special education.

Read the full article below:
http://jdsde.oxfordjournals.org/content/10/1/51.full.pdf

Summary
In sum, fear of attachment as well as self-esteem emerged as good predictors of well-being for both D/HH and H participants. Moreover, this study uncovered a discrepancy between previous research, which concluded that young D/HH children do not differ from their H peers in childhood attachment, and the current outcomes, which revealed clear intergroup differences in adult attachment. This discrepancy suggests that development during later childhood and adolescence negatively influences the establishment of secure adult attachments, despite involvement of some participants in marital or committed relationships.
One central factor in this developmental process comprises the social and educational context of the D/HH participants. The D/HH participants of the present study were graduates of mainstreaming educational programs. It seems that the D/HH participants competed well with hearing young adults with regard to academic achievements (e.g., years of education) but mainstreaming did not ensure a similar level of development in the social domain. However, in order to better evaluate the effect of educational
placement on social adjustment, comparisons with other groups of D/HH young adults, such as graduates of special programs, are necessary.
 

howag

New Member
Wrong. Even as an older adult, people still stare at me when I go out in public. They also think as a person carrying a white cane that they can cheat me if I am alone.

A local restaurant tried twice to give me a chicken thigh dinner instead of the breast I asked for as they thought I would be unable to tell the difference. I don't go there anymore.

People who don't live as a different person don't have an opportunity to see the little things that happen to us everyday that eventually add up to a lot of anger and resentment.

And for anyone who wonders, my father taught me to fight back.
Did you ask the waiter what he was playing at? Could it not have been a mix up? Are you absolutely sure it was because you're deaf that they gave you a chicken thigh? Seems like you jumped to that conclusion.
 

Bottesini

Old Deaf Ranter
Premium Member
Did you ask the waiter what he was playing at? Could it not have been a mix up? Are you absolutely sure it was because you're deaf that they gave you a chicken thigh? Seems like you jumped to that conclusion.
Sunshine is correct it's because I am blind. But you right now are doing something that happens a lot.

You are dismissing my perceptions and saying I jumped to conclusions. :hmm:

If I go to a restaurant with family members who can obviously tell the difference and my order is correct, but two times I go alone and get a cheap substitution for what I ordered, that is pretty definitive.

People tend to think I am snappish with hearing and late deafened people, but they are the people who would say I jumped to a conclusion after I tried to tell them something they wanted to know.
 
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