Adjustment to late onset deafness

Biscuit01

New Member
I have just been referred to this post by one of the members, so here goes:

It was October 2018, I was 52 years old and suddenly I couldn't hear, walk, use my left hand. In fact I couldn't understand much, I was a bit of a wreck.I had no idea what had happened to me, other than that they had just brought me round from an induced coma and I had suffered a series of mini strokes when they were bringing me round. They explained that I was going to Rehab later that week.

Once there they provided me with a notepad, it was then that I found out that I was taken into hospital with {bacterial) meningitus and immediately put into the induced coma. I had been under for 3 weeks.

I came out of Rehab on December 23rd 2018, able to walk a few steps with support and able to grip with my left hand, but my hearing had totally gone. I had been told that hearing aids wouldn't help and that I had been referred for a cochlear implant.

I was so relieved to think that I would be able to hear again. I had my implant in April 2019 and it was activated on May 2nd. They have told me that I need to learn to listen again and that it can take years to be able to hear music again.

Everything seems to be on the up and up, I am slowly learning how to walk again, nobody would notice that I have weakness in my left hand now and I can hold a conversation with my husband. But why am I not feeling happier?

The emotional side I feel that I am over, after months of crying. I tend to avoid people that I knew prior to my illness, as I cant stand the pitying looks when I tell them that I have now become deaf.

My husband has been very supportive, as have the rest of my family, My attitude has always been "Right this has happened, now lets get on with it" but I am feeling so isolated.

So now I would like to ask a few questions:

I am not sure if to learn British Sign Language or Makaton?
Are there any deaf social clubs left in the UK?
Is there anything like Late onset deafness association in the UK?

Thanks for reading this.
 

deerheart12

Member
I have just been referred to this post by one of the members, so here goes:

It was October 2018, I was 52 years old and suddenly I couldn't hear, walk, use my left hand. In fact I couldn't understand much, I was a bit of a wreck.I had no idea what had happened to me, other than that they had just brought me round from an induced coma and I had suffered a series of mini strokes when they were bringing me round. They explained that I was going to Rehab later that week.

Once there they provided me with a notepad, it was then that I found out that I was taken into hospital with {bacterial) meningitus and immediately put into the induced coma. I had been under for 3 weeks.

I came out of Rehab on December 23rd 2018, able to walk a few steps with support and able to grip with my left hand, but my hearing had totally gone. I had been told that hearing aids wouldn't help and that I had been referred for a cochlear implant.

I was so relieved to think that I would be able to hear again. I had my implant in April 2019 and it was activated on May 2nd. They have told me that I need to learn to listen again and that it can take years to be able to hear music again.

Everything seems to be on the up and up, I am slowly learning how to walk again, nobody would notice that I have weakness in my left hand now and I can hold a conversation with my husband. But why am I not feeling happier?

The emotional side I feel that I am over, after months of crying. I tend to avoid people that I knew prior to my illness, as I cant stand the pitying looks when I tell them that I have now become deaf.

My husband has been very supportive, as have the rest of my family, My attitude has always been "Right this has happened, now lets get on with it" but I am feeling so isolated.

So now I would like to ask a few questions:

I am not sure if to learn British Sign Language or Makaton?
Are there any deaf social clubs left in the UK?
Is there anything like Late onset deafness association in the UK?

Thanks for reading this.
Hi! Welcome to this site. I found some useful links that may help you.



this one seems to list local groups that you could join and mingle with others dealing with hearing loss.

You could also search for meningitis support groups online as well. Or anything with cochlear implants forum/support group

If you have a local community college or adult education center that offers BSL British Sign Language that is a new way to meet people. Of course it's a little hard now with all the coronavirus restrictions but something to think about in the future.

I'm in USA so I use American Sign Language (ASL) I'm not fimalar Makaton signs but do ask others if it's worth learning. I assume BSL would be better as it's widely common in your country.

Hope that helps you out
Cheers! Annie :)
 

zephren

Well-Known Member
I have just been referred to this post by one of the members, so here goes:

It was October 2018, I was 52 years old and suddenly I couldn't hear, walk, use my left hand. In fact I couldn't understand much, I was a bit of a wreck.I had no idea what had happened to me, other than that they had just brought me round from an induced coma and I had suffered a series of mini strokes when they were bringing me round. They explained that I was going to Rehab later that week.

Once there they provided me with a notepad, it was then that I found out that I was taken into hospital with {bacterial) meningitus and immediately put into the induced coma. I had been under for 3 weeks.

I came out of Rehab on December 23rd 2018, able to walk a few steps with support and able to grip with my left hand, but my hearing had totally gone. I had been told that hearing aids wouldn't help and that I had been referred for a cochlear implant.

I was so relieved to think that I would be able to hear again. I had my implant in April 2019 and it was activated on May 2nd. They have told me that I need to learn to listen again and that it can take years to be able to hear music again.

Everything seems to be on the up and up, I am slowly learning how to walk again, nobody would notice that I have weakness in my left hand now and I can hold a conversation with my husband. But why am I not feeling happier?

The emotional side I feel that I am over, after months of crying. I tend to avoid people that I knew prior to my illness, as I cant stand the pitying looks when I tell them that I have now become deaf.

My husband has been very supportive, as have the rest of my family, My attitude has always been "Right this has happened, now lets get on with it" but I am feeling so isolated.

So now I would like to ask a few questions:

I am not sure if to learn British Sign Language or Makaton?
Are there any deaf social clubs left in the UK?
Is there anything like Late onset deafness association in the UK?

Thanks for reading this.
I suggest learning BSL. This a language of Deaf people. Makaton is general for people can hear but not speak or other communication challenges. BSL will help you social with Deaf people and doing so may help you be less isolated and adjust to the new you. It will also give you the option to have an interpreter to make things more accessible.

Like any language it will take time and be frustrating. It will be worth the effort.

I'm in the US so I can't make club or event recommendations but I know they are out there. You may want to check out Action on Hearing Loss - UK based organization.

 
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