Addiction is not a funy at all

ThanushPuolsen

New Member
Recently, I've realized that I have so many friends who use different drugs or drink a lot that it starts scaring me. The worst is that everyone has such friends. Oh my God! It blows my mind.
I'm trying to say that these guys who get high every day and swallow their bloody merry at a nightclub don't even realize that they have a serious problem, they are addicted. Most of them justify themselves like "I can give up at any time, I just want to have some fun now." The reality is that drugs and alcohol are not funny at all, especially when it is about 16yo boy or girl. People! Are you serious?
The young generation now lives in such an environment where you can get and try everything that you want. But once it brings pleasure, no one thinks about negative consequences and just drift. Someone is scared, someone doesn't know how to quit, someone just takes up with the wrong guys. The responsibility lays not only on the addicts, people around like friend, roommate, or a family member are also responsible. Parents are responsible for being too busy at work, the local communities are responsible for not enough prevention measures, society is responsible for letting this happen. However, there is a way out various rehabs, and addiction treatment programs (https://addictionresource.com/treatment/).
So, don't be indifferent and help your friends understand their problems and go through treatment.
 

seb

Well-Known Member
Sadly you can talk to your friends and family about their problem but until they want to do something about it, they will continue with their addiction. A friend of mine's son has been to various rehab programs five times and each time he relapses because he doesn't want to quit. The last time his dad was told 1/3 relapse, 1/3 make it and 1/3 die! At this point my friend would love outcome #2 but he's also okay with outcome #3 because this has been going on for over 30 years.
 

ThanushPuolsen

New Member
Sadly you can talk to your friends and family about their problem but until they want to do something about it, they will continue with their addiction. A friend of mine's son has been to various rehab programs five times and each time he relapses because he doesn't want to quit. The last time his dad was told 1/3 relapse, 1/3 make it and 1/3 die! At this point my friend would love outcome #2 but he's also okay with outcome #3 because this has been going on for over 30 years.
I agree that the will of an addict plays a major role. Nothing can be changed without a sincere desire to quit. However, I believe that we still can help the addicts to make the right choice.
 

Bear

Well-Known Member
You cannot blame those around the addict. I am sorry to have to disagree with you on this. The addict is the one who made the choice to try whatever they are doing in the first place. I never got into drinking and drugs. I have drank before and do drink very little still, I have tried weed before but had a reaction to it and never tried that again. I cannot blame others for the choices that I made. My mother had the alcohol at home and allowed me to drink it. I made the choice whether if I wanted to drink it or not. Sometimes I did, most times I didnt. I also chose to stop drinking until I was drunk. If I drink at all now it is maybe 1 or 2 shots and that's it or a mixed drink. When I smoked weed, I did it with my first husband because he kept begging me to try it. Is it his fault? Nope that was MY choice. I was also a smoker since I was 10 years old....I finally quit at 41. Who's fault that I smoked? No one's. I was immature at 10 yes. I didn't fully realize the dangers yes. However, I still made the choice. I kept making the choice, even after I knew the dangers.

Today's society is just all too eager to lay the blame elsewhere. Oh, addiction is a disease. Sorry, I realize it may be recognized by psychiatry and other professionals; however, just because it is recognized doesn't mean it's right. A person makes the choice to try a drug or alcohol or any other addictive substances. Their choice to remain addicted to it is still just a choice. I have friends who are on drugs and use every excuse in the book why it is not their fault that they continue to abuse and use. I have alcoholic friends who use every excuse in the book. Then, I have recovering friends who admit that they used every excuse in the book to continue their addictions. However, they now realize that it is just that....an excuse.

Taking personal responsibility is what we need and we need to force people to take responsibility for their own actions. This society today is all about laying the blame elsewhere and we can plainly see where that is getting us. Look to the past where we believed in taking personal responsibility and then you will see the difference. The excuses have to stop somewhere.
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
People do and will make excuses for the choices they have made....blaming everybody else for what they have done to themselves. ...then expect the taxpayers to pay for their treatment and methadone....It's a never-ending cycle....IMO...drug abuse is a choice, not a disease.
 

seb

Well-Known Member
People do and will make excuses for the choices they have made....blaming everybody else for what they have done to themselves. ...then expect the taxpayers to pay for their treatment and methadone....It's a never-ending cycle....IMO...drug abuse is a choice, not a disease.
Addiction is not a choice it is a disease. Yes, it was the persons choice to originally try the drug, but once they are hooked, they are controlled by the drug until they make the choice to stop and depending on how much of a hold the drug has on them will determine if they can successfully end their addiction. Some can, some can't. As I said earlier, 1/3 are successful, 1/3 will relapse and 1/3 will die!
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
Addiction is not a choice it is a disease. Yes, it was the persons choice to originally try the drug, but once they are hooked, they are controlled by the drug until they make the choice to stop and depending on how much of a hold the drug has on them will determine if they can successfully end their addiction. Some can, some can't. As I said earlier, 1/3 are successful, 1/3 will relapse and 1/3 will die!
Agree to disagree...
 

seb

Well-Known Member
Agree to disagree...
So how do you explain the people who continuously try to quit smoking or doing drugs and fail time after time after time. 1/3 are successful, 1/3 relapse and 1/3 die. Too many studies out there that show addiction is a disease.
 

Beowulf

Well-Known Member
Premium Member
A boat beneath a sunny sky,
Lingering onward dreamily
In an evening of July—

Children three that nestle near,
Eager eye and willing ear,
Pleased a simple tale to hear—

Long has paled that sunny sky:
Echoes fade and memories die:
Autumn frosts have slain July.

Still she haunts me, phantomwise,
Alice moving under skies
Never seen by waking eyes.

Children yet, the tale to hear,
Eager eye and willing ear,
Lovingly shall nestle near.

In a Wonderland they lie,
Dreaming as the days go by,
Dreaming as the summers die.

Ever drifting down the stream—
Lingering in the golden gleam—
Life, what is it but a dream?

—Lewis Carrol—
 

Bear

Well-Known Member
So how do you explain the people who continuously try to quit smoking or doing drugs and fail time after time after time. 1/3 are successful, 1/3 relapse and 1/3 die. Too many studies out there that show addiction is a disease.

The studies may show it but it doesn't make it true. Studies also show that practically anything and everything you do is an illness or a disease. The reason they do this is because people want excuses for their behavior and of course the medical model is going to help provide one. I was addicted to cigarettes for over 30 years. I chose to quit smoking many of times....I failed most of them and now that I have truly quit, I realize that the only reason why I ever failed is because I did not want to quit. When I finally really wanted to quit....I did it. Do I still wanna smoke even after 6 years of being quit? Hell yes! Why don't I? I make the choice to ignore it and continue staying quit. I mean I LITERALLY tell myself multiple times a week that I don't want it, nor do I need it. The reason people go back is because they choose to. It all comes down to choice.


But yes, I will gladly agree to disagree.
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
In these days and times...everybody (or they should) know what drugs will do to you...You do have a choice to do drugs or not...knowing you can get addicted....It was a choice to begin with...Just Say NO! has been around a long time....When you make that choice?...it's on you. And to say "I've got a Disease"??...No...you've got an addiction by choice.
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
What if I’m addicted to anything that makes me feel good?
Such as?.....there are many things that make me feel good...Coffee in the AM makes me feel good and I get grouchy if I run out, but I'm not addicted to it. I just like it, and know I can do without it if necessary. Sort of like mind over matter....it don't control me. Same as for alcohol and drugs...moderation is the key. Some people do have a weaker mind set tho'...it's not a disease...perhaps it's a choice to let it control you ?? And anything that makes you feel good...doesn't mean it's always good for you
 

seb

Well-Known Member
The studies may show it but it doesn't make it true. Studies also show that practically anything and everything you do is an illness or a disease. The reason they do this is because people want excuses for their behavior and of course the medical model is going to help provide one. I was addicted to cigarettes for over 30 years. I chose to quit smoking many of times....I failed most of them and now that I have truly quit, I realize that the only reason why I ever failed is because I did not want to quit. When I finally really wanted to quit....I did it. Do I still wanna smoke even after 6 years of being quit? Hell yes! Why don't I? I make the choice to ignore it and continue staying quit. I mean I LITERALLY tell myself multiple times a week that I don't want it, nor do I need it. The reason people go back is because they choose to. It all comes down to choice.


But yes, I will gladly agree to disagree.
Pretty much what I said, you may not want to admit it but your addiction to cigarettes was and is a disease because complex changes went on in your brain that got you addicted to cigarettes and even today 6 years later you still want to smoke.
 

Bear

Well-Known Member
Yes but you are also ignoring the fact that I make the CHOICE every single day not to smoke. Cancer is a disease, no one has the choice on whether if they get it or not. So therefore, it is a disease. MS is also a disease, no one has the choice on whether if they get that or not. When you pick up a drink, a smoke , or a drug and use it KNOWING you can become addicted it to it....you made a choice. You cannot call it a disease because you didnt contract it unwillingly as you do with cancer, ms, and etc.

Agreeing to disagree here because I am not trying to change your view and you arent going to change mine. By calling it a disease, we are basically giving drug addicts a free ride in the criminal justice system because eventually someone is going to use it as a defense and god forbid if the defense is ever given credit by a not guilty verdict. As it is Ohio is already trying to pass laws to basically decriminalize drugs.
 

LoveBlue

Well-Known Member
So, is depression a “disease”? Some people think it’s “simply” mind over matter.
Perhaps disease is not the right word for addition. Perhaps it’s more like depression which is a chemical imbalance. I suffered depressio once. I did not choose to be depressed. With the help of medication & talk therapy it eventually went away. The type I had, postpartum, is known to go away on its own but it can be really bad before it does. Some people need to be treated for depression for a life time.
 

rockin'robin

Well-Known Member
No, I don't think depression is a disease either. It's life in general...People get depressed over a variety of things that have happened/happening in their lives, some more severe/tragic than others.
 

seb

Well-Known Member
Yes but you are also ignoring the fact that I make the CHOICE every single day not to smoke. Cancer is a disease, no one has the choice on whether if they get it or not. So therefore, it is a disease. MS is also a disease, no one has the choice on whether if they get that or not. When you pick up a drink, a smoke , or a drug and use it KNOWING you can become addicted it to it....you made a choice. You cannot call it a disease because you didnt contract it unwillingly as you do with cancer, ms, and etc.

Agreeing to disagree here because I am not trying to change your view and you arent going to change mine. By calling it a disease, we are basically giving drug addicts a free ride in the criminal justice system because eventually someone is going to use it as a defense and god forbid if the defense is ever given credit by a not guilty verdict. As it is Ohio is already trying to pass laws to basically decriminalize drugs.
It's already been used as a defense. Decriminalizing drugs is happening all over the country. The state governments are finding it saves a lot of money to treat these people rather than incarcerate them, although you will have the prison guards throwing a fit because they will begin to loose their jobs as the prison populations go down.
 
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