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Unread 08-19-2011, 05:43 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Converting English text to ASL gloss

Dear all,
I'm new in this forum. And I found it very interesting.

I'm working on sign language processing. So, I want to know how can i convert English written text to ASL gloss.
1/ Are there rules to respect ?
2/ Are there useful online ressources ?

Thank you.
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Unread 08-22-2011, 09:39 AM   #2 (permalink)
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That's a huge question. Of course there are rules to respect, and they are very complex and nuanced to the point that nobody could adequately describe them in a forum post. Try describing the rules of any language in the brief format of an internet post and you'd find the task similarly impossible.

As for online resources, Lifeprint.com is excellent.
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Unread 08-22-2011, 09:51 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountain Man View Post
That's a huge question. Of course there are rules to respect, and they are very complex and nuanced to the point that nobody could adequately describe them in a forum post. Try describing the rules of any language in the brief format of an internet post and you'd find the task similarly impossible.

As for online resources, Lifeprint.com is excellent.
Wow, an EXCELLENT reference point for my friends! Thanks!
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Unread 08-22-2011, 11:38 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountain Man View Post
That's a huge question. Of course there are rules to respect, and they are very complex and nuanced to the point that nobody could adequately describe them in a forum post. Try describing the rules of any language in the brief format of an internet post and you'd find the task similarly impossible.

As for online resources, Lifeprint.com is excellent.
Hey I love that link!
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Unread 08-22-2011, 03:46 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I love it on lifeprint pretty good nice
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Unread 08-23-2011, 06:55 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Oh thank you for the link.

My need is how to convert English sentence to ASL like this:
English sentence : What city do you live in?
In ASL : CITY YOU LIVE?

or:
English sentence : Do you like learning sign?
In ASL : YOU LIKE LEARN SIGN?


So, I tried to extract grammar rules of English sentences. Then, I want to convert the english written text to ASL.

Are there any useful ressources ?

Thansk in advance.
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Unread 08-24-2011, 08:41 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mituser View Post
1/ Are there rules to respect ?
Yes. As you learn ASL, you will learn the rules of grammar and syntax. If you are taking an ASL class, your instructor should be explaining and using the rules.

Quote:
2/ Are there useful online ressources ?
Others here have given some online resources. The book that I recommend for learning the grammar rules is from the Green Book Series, titled A Teacher's Resource Text on Grammar and Culture by Charlotte Baker and Dennis Cokely.
Amazon.com: American Sign Language Green Books, A Teacher's Resource Text on Grammar and Culture (Green Book Series) (9780930323844): Charlotte Baker-Shenk, Dennis Cokely: Books Amazon.com: American Sign Language Green Books, A Teacher's Resource Text on Grammar and Culture (Green Book Series) (9780930323844): Charlotte Baker-Shenk, Dennis Cokely: Books
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Unread 08-24-2011, 12:16 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Thank you

Hi Reba,

thank you very much.
I think that i have to buy the book. It seems interesting.
I found also :
Amazon.com: Linguistics of American Sign Language: An Introduction, 4th Ed. (9781563682834): Clayton Valli, Ceil Lucas, Kristin J. Mulrooney: Books Amazon.com: Linguistics of American Sign Language: An Introduction, 4th Ed. (9781563682834): Clayton Valli, Ceil Lucas, Kristin J. Mulrooney: Books

Have a good day.
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Unread 08-24-2011, 03:40 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mituser View Post
Oh thank you for the link.

My need is how to convert English sentence to ASL like this:
English sentence : What city do you live in?
In ASL : CITY YOU LIVE?

or:
English sentence : Do you like learning sign?
In ASL : YOU LIKE LEARN SIGN?


So, I tried to extract grammar rules of English sentences. Then, I want to convert the english written text to ASL.

Are there any useful ressources ?

Thansk in advance.
I'm not sure what you're looking for exactly. If you mean a simple guide for translating English to ASL, you're unlikely to find anything like that.

And for the record, neither of those examples are ASL. I might translate the first one as:

CITY YOU FROM NAME WHAT?

and the second:

SIGN LANGUAGE YOU LEARN ENJOY?

The problem with translating into sign language this way is that, obviously, it's words and not signs, but also you're not getting any of the non-manual grammatical signals and affect that are a part of the language.
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Unread 08-24-2011, 04:52 PM   #10 (permalink)
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I'm new to this, but I've been wondering why don't glosses include commas (for where one would pause in their signing) and notations to indicate facial expressions?
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Unread 07-19-2012, 01:26 AM   #11 (permalink)
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I am an ASL 101 student in desparate need for a English to Gloss translator. Does anyone have any suggestions?
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Unread 07-20-2012, 09:10 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jazzberry View Post
I'm new to this, but I've been wondering why don't glosses include commas (for where one would pause in their signing) and notations to indicate facial expressions?
The green books by Dennis Cokely have helped me a lot. At first I didn't understand, but one of my Deaf teachers explained it much better than a hearing teacher I previously had.

These books DO have notations to indicate facial expressions and direction references. It also has many other symbols and notations to represent various parts of the sentences.There is no "true" written form of ASL, but I find these green books very helpful.
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Unread 07-20-2012, 09:52 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Euphoria View Post
The green books by Dennis Cokely have helped me a lot. At first I didn't understand, but one of my Deaf teachers explained it much better than a hearing teacher I previously had.

These books DO have notations to indicate facial expressions and direction references. It also has many other symbols and notations to represent various parts of the sentences.There is no "true" written form of ASL, but I find these green books very helpful.

There is one book titled "Linguistics of ASL" and throughout the book, one can find glosses of phrases that have symbols and notations to show face expressions and direction, location, and pronoun references. Also, there are certain terms that can be used for mouth morphemes such as CHA.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mcrombie View Post
I am an ASL 101 student in desparate need for a English to Gloss translator. Does anyone have any suggestions?
There is no such program that functions as an English to Gloss translator. You will need to use help from skilled ASL users who have a strong understanding of linguistics to help in that regard. That's why we are here to help you!
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Unread 01-15-2013, 01:25 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Help

Hey, I've recently become enthralled with signing and the deaf community i realize tht as a hearing person i cant just step into the deaf world but it really interests me.
I'm wanting help to translate the song "how Deep The Father's Love For Us" into gloss.
here are the words:
How deep the Father's love for us,
How vast beyond all measure
That He should give His only Son
To make a wretch His treasure

How great the pain of searing loss,
The Father turns His face away
As wounds which mar the chosen One,
Bring many sons to glory

Behold the Man upon a cross,
My sin upon His shoulders
Ashamed I hear my mocking voice,
Call out among the scoffers

It was my sin that held Him ther
Until it was accomplished
His dying breath has brought me life
I know that it is finished

I will not boast in anything
No gifts, no power, no wisdom
But I will boast in Jesus Christ
His death and resurrection

Why should I gain from His reward?
I cannot give an answer
But this I know with all my heart
His wounds have paid my ransom
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Unread 01-24-2013, 12:48 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Translating artistic expressions like music and poetry is a whole different matter than straight translations from English. You really need to look past the language and find the deep meaning of the text.

For example, the first lines of the song, "How deep the Father's love for us; How vast beyond all measure" could be signed as GOD LOVE WOW-AWESOME; FOREVER LIMIT NONE

Of course nobody here is going to translate the whole song for you. Show us what you've come up with, and I'm sure you'll get some feedback.
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Last edited by Mountain Man; 01-24-2013 at 01:40 PM.
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Unread 03-20-2014, 03:39 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Red face Gloss Conversion

I too, at 57, am an ASL student. In the second year you have to convert fables to gloss and present to the teacher and another Deaf adult your production. The grade if not just for your signing, but your expressions (which hearing people do not use) and shoulder shifting and also a copy of your Gloss. It is hard work (which is why the assignment is given over the spring break. Many students are looking for Quick and Easy answers to this problem. BUT, if you can't do the majority of the work yourself, how do you plan on being an interpreter for the Deaf? It is a way to get you focused on what you need to do to succeed in the business! Good luck to all who are assigned this project.
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