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Unread 02-05-2012, 07:44 AM   #1
Frisky Feline
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Does CI affect some nerves?

Several friends of mine who works at school, some teachers or some teacher aides and we happen to talk about how deaf kids behaves or approach etc. Some of them asked me a specfici question because they know that my hub who have CI. Their question was they noticed that kids from age 3 to teenagers who just GOT ci and within a year or two years later, they can see that their behaviors change due to so many facial expression differently like squnting eyes, or body language seems uncomfortable etc. we are not sure if it relates with listening too loud that has not change to lower the volumes or nerves being hit when it sounds or etc. They do concern about it but for Adults who get CI recently and they feel ok but sometimes it went wrong but they can let doctor know right away. But children delays the responses and make doctors aware at a much later when they are not comfortable.

any thoughts as to why their facial expression changes after they get ci, within a year or two years later, only babies to around 7 yrs old or 8 years old?

FYI I am not a teacher or not working with children. It makes me curious that i know some of you who are working with children.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 08:35 AM   #2
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The big answer is: Yes - the auditory nerve..

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisky Feline View Post
Several friends of mine who works at school, some teachers or some teacher aides and we happen to talk about how deaf kids behaves or approach etc. Some of them asked me a specfici question because they know that my hub who have CI. Their question was they noticed that kids from age 3 to teenagers who just GOT ci and within a year or two years later, they can see that their behaviors change due to so many facial expression differently like squnting eyes, or body language seems uncomfortable etc. we are not sure if it relates with listening too loud that has not change to lower the volumes or nerves being hit when it sounds or etc. They do concern about it but for Adults who get CI recently and they feel ok but sometimes it went wrong but they can let doctor know right away. But children delays the responses and make doctors aware at a much later when they are not comfortable.

any thoughts as to why their facial expression changes after they get ci, within a year or two years later, only babies to around 7 yrs old or 8 years old?

FYI I am not a teacher or not working with children. It makes me curious that i know some of you who are working with children.
Very, very strange "observations"... I would like to hear these observations from first hand. Please invite your friends to explain their observation here on AllDeaf.

About CI and nerves:
When a recess is drilled in the skull, and a hole to the middle ear, the other facial nerves are monitored to prevent hitting/damaging them.
Sometimes there is some strange tastes and feeling after the operation.
I have not heard of this lasting long. I have never heard of the strange behaviour that "you" are seeing. But obviously, adult CI users here on AllDeaf will be able to elaborate on this.

Loud sounds would not cause "strange behaviour" as CI is very good at cutting off sounds when they become too loud.
About "facial expression differently like squnting eyes, or body language seems uncomfortable". This is not the cause of CI.. unless the CI is malfunctioning..
You - your friends - seem to observe continuous "strange behaviour"..

What could be the cause of all these observations might be the lack of information people have about CI.
Another reason for this could be the misinformation spread by people fiercely against CI, scaring any parents with false stories. Falling in the category of "hole in skulls, not able to play sports, not able to swim"

that case I hope my explanation was sufficient.. If it wasn't, please ask..
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Last edited by naisho; 02-05-2012 at 11:14 AM. Reason: removed off topic
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Unread 02-05-2012, 08:44 AM   #3
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I never noticed that with any of the children with CIs that I have worked with... Usually if a noise is too loud, they would inform the school's audiologist but I work with the older ones. My brother's girlfriend is a PreK teacher at the same deaf program I work at. I can ask her about the little ones.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 09:02 AM   #4
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Cloggy, is it really so improbable that some people had problems with their CIs?
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Unread 02-05-2012, 09:18 AM   #5
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Anyways...back to topic. To the OP, I have worked with kids who chose not to wear their CIs later on due to getting headaches but also worked with kids who continue to wear them.

I dont know about behavior after getting the surgery. Hmmm..
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Unread 02-05-2012, 09:36 AM   #6
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i am not there to see kids what they were doing in the classroom. my friend gave me a few examples. When the little boy has no ci and he moves a lot and turns the head or his facial expression look normal. After he got a CI, and a few months was normal for him to recover it. The following year or two years later, his eyes all of a sudden, squinting or twitching eyes more than before and look very uneasy or uncomfortable. of course my friend whos a teacher aide was very concerned and worked with him, but not him and two kids too. that s how she asked me if my hub's eyeing was twitching or anything. I said, " no " but " he dislikes it when anything is too close to his head that freaks him out. Before he didnt have a CI. He didnt care but now he does.

Last edited by Frisky Feline; 02-05-2012 at 10:54 AM.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 09:54 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shel90 View Post
I never noticed that with any of the children with CIs that I have worked with... Usually if a noise is too loud, they would inform the school's audiologist but I work with the older ones. My brother's girlfriend is a PreK teacher at the same deaf program I work at. I can ask her about the little ones.
Like Shel, I can't speak for all, of course, but I've not ever noticed that situation in the ~15 or so children I knew before they had CIs and encounter regularly today after they've been implanted for several years. Perhaps the squinting noticed indicates a vision issue.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 10:04 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisky Feline View Post
i am not there to see kids what they were doing in the classroom. my friend gave me a few examples. When the little boy has no ci and he moves a lot and turns the head or his facial expression look normal. After he got a CI, and a few months was normal for him to recover it. The following year or two years later, his eyes all of a sudden, squinting or twitcing eyes more than before and look very uneasy or uncomfortable. of coure my friend whos a teacher aide was very concerned and worked with him, but not him and two kids too. that s how she asked me if my hub's eyeing was twitching or anything. I said, " no " but " he dislikes it when anything is too close to his head that freaks him out. Before he didnt have a CI. He didnt care but now he does.
Nope, never seen that behavior.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 10:05 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrendelQ View Post
Like Shel, I can't speak for all, of course, but I've not ever noticed that situation in the ~15 or so children I knew before they had CIs and encounter regularly today after they've been implanted for several years. Perhaps the squinting noticed indicates a vision issue.
Squinting/twitching, looking very uncomfortable, all related to vision issues?
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Unread 02-05-2012, 10:21 AM   #10
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Lissa who is a member here, has CI since age 10 and has mentioned how it affects her right eye.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 10:59 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeafCaroline View Post
Squinting/twitching, looking very uncomfortable, all related to vision issues?

Seems so.


kids did the slighty ducking down their heads as well that looks too obviously to my friends.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 11:24 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisky Feline View Post
Seems so.


kids did the slighty ducking down their heads as well that looks too obviously to my friends.
and that's related to vision issues as well?
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Unread 02-05-2012, 11:26 AM   #13
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and that's related to vision issues as well?
no like a twitching body like nerves being hit on.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 11:34 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frisky Feline View Post
no like a twitching body like nerves being hit on.
Ah! That doesn't sound like vision issues to me, wonder why someone else seems to think it is.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 11:39 AM   #15
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The surgery itself, there is always the risk of severing or damaging some nerves. There is one that I know of who suffered some nerve damages after receiving a cochlear implant. He lost the use of nearly his entire right arm.

A lot of different surgeries often list nerve damages as a potential complication.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 11:41 AM   #16
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Wondering if these children can "explain" the sensation/feeling?...Sort of like "zinnnging"....a small electrical shock?....
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Unread 02-05-2012, 11:42 AM   #17
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Wirelessly posted

a bad MAP could cause an eye twitch or something like that. The audiologist should notice and adjust the electrode that is causing the stimulation. It isn't dangerous, but it would probably be annoying.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 11:44 AM   #18
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Perhaps it depends mainly on the surgeon, just thinking aloud. You have good surgeons and even ones who make mistakes.

One minor mistake and you get paralysis for life, it's a risk I think anyone has to sign the waiver when they agree to the surgery. It's probably controversial for operating on children because the size of their nerves are smaller than adults whom have it developed already, which may be why you see less complications in people who got it later in life. Don't know if this is the answer, just thinking aloud here.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 11:47 AM   #19
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a bad MAP could cause an eye twitch or something like that. The audiologist should notice and adjust the electrode that is causing the stimulation. It isn't dangerous, but it would probably be annoying.
It's the same with hearing aids. If the hearing aids is overamplified and poorly programmed, it can cause headaches, eye squinting, exhaustion and more.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 11:49 AM   #20
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Quote:
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Wondering if these children can "explain" the sensation/feeling?...Sort of like "zinnnging"....a small electrical shock?....
that's what my friends say what kids look like this what you just described. My close friend whos a teacher aide and work with elementary and notice some same patterns in some of them. Not all of them, just a few of them that left her some wonder and asked me if i notice anything.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 12:05 PM   #21
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I've had the same sensation for years and years. It's gotten better, tho' and being an adult, I'm sure can deal with it better than children.
Never wore a HA and of course am rejecting the CI.....

So my guess it relates to the surgerys I've had...and perhaps to the CI surgery the children have....even perhaps the beginning of tennitis....

It's not only uncomfortable, the severity of it can escalate....I've gotten headaches from it, and could not concentrate...Even my friend told me once....you keep twitching ur eye...looks like you are "winking" at people....I sort of down-played it, saying my eye itches....but a lot of people actually "thought" I was winking at them.....
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Unread 02-05-2012, 12:12 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeafCaroline View Post
Squinting/twitching, looking very uncomfortable, all related to vision issues?
I don't know -- are you saying you think all of those things are related to vision, not just squinting? I hadn't heard of that. I mentioned squinting - alone - as "perhaps" being an indicator of a vision issue: My daughter squinted a bit, just one eye, and was referred to a specialist to assess her vision. Elem. teachers are often told to watch for squinting in very young children, to flag those who might have as yet undiagnosed vision issues.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 12:12 PM   #23
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Yeah, I do have issues with my right eye but only when they get the computer to run through electrodes. It's to do with the current leaking so close to the nerve or something(if i remember correctly) so my sound levels cannot really be increased anymore due to this.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 12:14 PM   #24
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Quote:
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I don't know -- are you saying you think all of those things are related to vision, not just squinting? I hadn't heard of that. I mentioned squinting - alone - as "perhaps" being an indicator of a vision issue: My daughter squinted a bit, just one eye, and was referred to a specialist to assess her vision. Elem. teachers are often told to watch for squinting in very young children, to flag those who might have as yet undiagnosed vision issues.
You were responding to Shel90 who was responding to Frisky Feline talking about squinting and twitching and other odd behaviours so naturally, i extrapolated that you were talking about all of those things.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 12:23 PM   #25
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Perhaps it depends mainly on the surgeon, just thinking aloud. You have good surgeons and even ones who make mistakes.

One minor mistake and you get paralysis for life, it's a risk I think anyone has to sign the waiver when they agree to the surgery. It's probably controversial for operating on children because the size of their nerves are smaller than adults whom have it developed already, which may be why you see less complications in people who got it later in life. Don't know if this is the answer, just thinking aloud here.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banjo View Post
The surgery itself, there is always the risk of severing or damaging some nerves. There is one that I know of who suffered some nerve damages after receiving a cochlear implant. He lost the use of nearly his entire right arm.

A lot of different surgeries often list nerve damages as a potential complication.
oh yes i had surgery and left me some numbs. if the doctor did one mistake and the whole thing is another story.

that is scary.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 12:28 PM   #26
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Quote:
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Yeah, I do have issues with my right eye but only when they get the computer to run through electrodes. It's to do with the current leaking so close to the nerve or something(if i remember correctly) so my sound levels cannot really be increased anymore due to this.
"Current leaking so close to the nerve".....
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Unread 02-05-2012, 12:35 PM   #27
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"Current leaking so close to the nerve".....
I can't remember exactly but along the lines. All patients and parents are told of the risks of being so close to the auditory nerve
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Unread 02-05-2012, 12:40 PM   #28
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I can't remember exactly but along the lines. All patients and parents are told of the risks of being so close to the auditory nerve
interesting. i will check with my hub to see if he remembers about it.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 02:07 PM   #29
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If I encountered twitching , I'd definitely think nerves were involved a d consider whether CI or ha settings could be an issue, esp. If I were someone who had surgery long ago before surgeons used monitors on facial nerves or had a new program. But if I were squinting or frowning or found a child making such expressions I wouldn't jump to that conclusion before checking vision.
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Unread 02-05-2012, 03:50 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Banjo View Post
The surgery itself, there is always the risk of severing or damaging some nerves. There is one that I know of who suffered some nerve damages after receiving a cochlear implant. He lost the use of nearly his entire right arm.
.........
It sounds as if they hit a nerve of the arm while implanting a CI..
What happened...?
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